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James F Halpin

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BUSINESS
July 30, 1990 | Chris Woodyard, Times staff writer
James F. Halpin talks above the scream of buzz saws and the pounding of nails at HomeClub Inc.'s corporate headquarters in Fullerton. It seems appropriate that the sounds of construction, rather than piped-in music, should ring through the halls of HomeClub's nerve center. For the chain is where many contractors and homeowners alike go to to find lumber and nails--as well as Christmas lights, garage doors and daffodils.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Halpin, the HomeBase Inc. president who guided the home-improvement chain through a name change and the dropping of its membership policy, is leaving to take on new duties at the parent company's headquarters in Massachusetts. Succeeding him will be William Patterson, 46, a career Sears, Roebuck & Co. executive who most recently was in charge of Sears' home-improvement business. Halpin's new duties at parent Waban Inc. in Natick, Mass., were not specified.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Halpin, the HomeBase Inc. president who guided the home-improvement chain through a name change and the dropping of its membership policy, is leaving to take on new duties at the parent company's headquarters in Massachusetts. Succeeding him will be William Patterson, 46, a career Sears, Roebuck & Co. executive who most recently was in charge of Sears' home-improvement business. Halpin's new duties at parent Waban Inc. in Natick, Mass., were not specified.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1990 | Chris Woodyard, Times staff writer
James F. Halpin talks above the scream of buzz saws and the pounding of nails at HomeClub Inc.'s corporate headquarters in Fullerton. It seems appropriate that the sounds of construction, rather than piped-in music, should ring through the halls of HomeClub's nerve center. For the chain is where many contractors and homeowners alike go to to find lumber and nails--as well as Christmas lights, garage doors and daffodils.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hoping to blunt any government action that would delay the release of its new Windows software, Microsoft Corp. is encouraging computer retailers to spread the word that a holdup would be bad for business. Several major computer-store chains on Thursday were telling government officials that sales and advertising plans would be seriously disrupted if Windows 98, Microsoft's new program for running computers, is not released on June 25 as scheduled. James F.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
HomeClub, the largest chain of home centers based on the West Coast, said Monday that it is abandoning its longstanding membership pricing policy in a bid to lure more customers. While the company has always allowed anyone to shop at its stores, it has been known for a membership plan that provided a 5% discount. The program, however, led some consumers to mistakenly think that they could not shop at HomeClub without a membership. "Membership was an impediment," HomeClub President James F.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four high-technology firms have asked the Justice Department not to prevent or postpone the release of Windows 95, Microsoft Corp.'s long-awaited new operating system software that is scheduled for shipment Aug. 24. In separate letters to Assistant Atty. Gen. Anne K. Bingaman, software developers Symantec Corp., a Cupertino, Calif., maker of utility software, and Corel Corp.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI and CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Jittery about the recession, Deborah McConnell, a 32-year-old grocery store manager in Huntington Beach, and her husband, Patrick, have cut back on their expenses, big and small. "We're not going out, and we watch cable television and rent videos," McConnell said. "We were thinking about having a child and buying a home, but now we're postponing that." Even with the Persian Gulf fighting over, McConnell said she isn't likely to go on a spending binge in the next six months.
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