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James F Neal

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NEWS
April 9, 1990 | From United Press International
Exxon through its lawyers is due to appear in federal court this afternoon for arraignment on criminal charges in connection with last year's disastrous Exxon Valdez oil spill. "We plan to defend ourselves vigorously," Exxon Shipping Co. attorney James Neal said from his Nashville law office before flying to Anchorage for the U.S. District Court arraignment. Exxon Corp., which is being represented by O'Melveny & Myers of Los Angeles, and Exxon Shipping Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
James F. Neal, a formidable lawyer who won noteworthy victories on both sides of the courtroom ? as a prosecutor he sent Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa and top Watergate figures to prison, and as a defense attorney he saved film director John Landis and Ford Motor Co. from serious criminal charges ? died Thursday at a Nashville hospital. He was 81. The cause was esophageal cancer, said his longtime law partner, Aubrey B. Harwell. Neal's reputation for tenacity and brilliance in the courtroom began with the 1964 prosecution of Hoffa, who had successfully fended off two dozen indictments until Neal, a stocky, cigar-chomping ex-Marine with a Tennessee drawl, was assigned to his case.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
James F. Neal, a formidable lawyer who won noteworthy victories on both sides of the courtroom ? as a prosecutor he sent Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa and top Watergate figures to prison, and as a defense attorney he saved film director John Landis and Ford Motor Co. from serious criminal charges ? died Thursday at a Nashville hospital. He was 81. The cause was esophageal cancer, said his longtime law partner, Aubrey B. Harwell. Neal's reputation for tenacity and brilliance in the courtroom began with the 1964 prosecution of Hoffa, who had successfully fended off two dozen indictments until Neal, a stocky, cigar-chomping ex-Marine with a Tennessee drawl, was assigned to his case.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | From United Press International
Exxon through its lawyers is due to appear in federal court this afternoon for arraignment on criminal charges in connection with last year's disastrous Exxon Valdez oil spill. "We plan to defend ourselves vigorously," Exxon Shipping Co. attorney James Neal said from his Nashville law office before flying to Anchorage for the U.S. District Court arraignment. Exxon Corp., which is being represented by O'Melveny & Myers of Los Angeles, and Exxon Shipping Co.
NEWS
April 30, 1987
The defense's final arguments in the "Twilight Zone" involuntary manslaughter trial have been postponed until next week because of the illness of a defense attorney. The action was taken after Eugene L. Trope, who represents helicopter pilot Dorcey Wingo, became ill with an inner-ear infection. Trope, along with attorneys for three other defendants, are scheduled to deliver their arguments after James F. Neal, who represents film director John Landis, concludes.
NEWS
August 29, 1986
A 12-member jury--made up mainly of blue-collar workers, hospital employees and homemakers--was selected Thursday to decide the fate of film director John Landis and four associates in the "Twilight Zone" manslaughter case. The panel of seven men and five women, will return to court Wednesday for opening statements. "I'm very happy," said the prosecutor Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1987 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A cameraman on the "Twilight Zone" film set testified Tuesday that when he warned director John Landis of the possible dangers of filming a mock Vietnam battle scene, Landis replied, "We may lose the helicopter." The cameraman, Stephen Lydecker, 45, added that he was "a bit shocked" by the statement.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A cameraman on the "Twilight Zone" film set maintained Wednesday that when he warned director John Landis of the possible dangers of filming a mock Vietnam battle scene, Landis replied, "We may lose the helicopter." But the cameraman, Stephen Lydecker, 45, gave various interpretations of Landis' remark inside and outside the courtroom as he concluded a two-day appearance on the witness stand in the involuntary manslaughter trial of Landis and four associates.
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore, acknowledging the seriousness of the legal and political controversy facing him, has retained two private defense lawyers, his aides said Friday. Gore's hiring of the lawyers--both politically seasoned former prosecutors--comes as Atty. Gen. Janet Reno is reviewing whether to seek appointment of an independent counsel to investigate aspects of the vice president's fund-raising for the 1996 campaign. Reno has until Oct.
NEWS
December 16, 1986 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A fire safety officer on the "Twilight Zone" film set testified Monday that he was never told by the film makers that two child actors would be used in the final filming sequence. Jack Tice, who also frequently works on film sets as a teacher/welfare worker responsible for the safety of child actors, added outside court that if he had known the children were being used, he would have shut down the set immediately. "I did not know they were there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1986 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A key prosecution witness and a former prosecutor in the Twilight Zone movie set deaths case contradicted each other Monday concerning testimony potentially damaging to director John Landis and his co-defendants. In an unusual appearance on the stand, Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1986 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A Fire Department official in charge of granting movie-set safety permits testified Thursday that he would probably not have approved one for the producers of the "Twilight Zone" film if he had been told that special-effects explosives were to be ignited under bamboo huts on the set.
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