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February 4, 1996 | Alex Raksin, Alex Raksin is an assistant Book Review editor
Twenty years ago, the film "All the Presidents Men" projected a sexy image of journalists uncovering scandal for the common good. At the pinnacle of their popularity, they were perceived as democracy's champions, members of a fourth branch of government able to uphold the ideals that America's three other branches seemed too sagging to support. Since then, journalists have only stepped up their adversarial gait, looking more fervently than ever for corruption and impropriety.
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December 27, 2013 | By Matt Cooper
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Dec. 29, 2013 - Jan. 4, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SPECIALS WWE Tribute to the Troops Pro wrestling's brawlers and beauties are joined by rock music's Daughtry, ventriloquist Jeff Dunham and others in this annual salute to the men and women of the U.S. armed forces....
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BOOKS
March 26, 1989 | RICHARD EDER
James Fallows raises interesting questions about America's sense that it is losing energy and purpose in the face of harder-driving competitors such as Japan. Less interestingly, he answers them. Fallows is an incisive and provocative journalist, as he has shown in writing about Washington, national defense and the Far East for the Atlantic Magazine, among others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2013 | By Anthony York
SHANGHAI -- It was a quiet day for California Gov. Jerry Brown on Saturday, beginning with a meeting of a ranking local Communist Party official and capped with a river cruise featuring former NBA superstar Yao Ming. Just another day in China for Brown and his delegation of nearly 100 government and business officials. The light schedule of the day was a welcome respite for a delegation that has bounced from government meetings to lavish meals this week. Many on the trip are holding side meetings with Chinese business officials, trying to drum up business for their companies back home.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The front wall of the U.S. News & World Report building is glass, a fragile housing for the magazine's new editor, James Fallows, who spent most of last spring throwing stones at his colleagues in the media. Fallows' best-selling book, "Breaking the News: How the Media Undermine American Democracy" (Pantheon Books, 1996), criticized many of his fellow journalists for becoming too rich, too egomaniacal, too pompous, too greedy, too simplistic and too negative.
NEWS
February 18, 1996 | BRIAN ALCORN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bob Dole is the old guy. Steve Forbes is the rich guy. Pat Buchanan is the mean guy. Lamar Alexander is the plaid guy. Bill Clinton is the guy who wants to keep his job. If this is the rough sum of your knowledge of the 1996 presidential race, you have no one to blame but yourself. Or, of course, the media.
BOOKS
August 7, 1994 | Andrew Horvat, The former Tokyo bureau chief for American Public Radio's "Marketplace," Andrew Horvat is a visiting scholar at Stanford University's Center for East Asian Studies
In "Looking at the Sun," James Fallows declares that the majority of Japan's nationally elected politicians are sons of politicians. The statement is one of many Fallows makes to warn American readers that Japan is not the democratic country they imagine it to be; it is also one of many that does not jibe with the facts.
MAGAZINE
May 8, 1994
I have just returned from an intense three-week tour of Southeast Asia and I was fascinated by the incredible insight in James Fallows' article ("Boom Times in Bangkok," April 10). It should be required reading for Warren Christopher and others running the State Department. Asia is indeed in the dynamic phase of its historical evolution. Given its boiling, restless entrepreneurial energy, the next century will indeed be an Asian one. JAY P. COOPER Newport Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2013 | By Anthony York
SHANGHAI -- It was a quiet day for California Gov. Jerry Brown on Saturday, beginning with a meeting of a ranking local Communist Party official and capped with a river cruise featuring former NBA superstar Yao Ming. Just another day in China for Brown and his delegation of nearly 100 government and business officials. The light schedule of the day was a welcome respite for a delegation that has bounced from government meetings to lavish meals this week. Many on the trip are holding side meetings with Chinese business officials, trying to drum up business for their companies back home.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Fallows, the high-profile editor of U.S. News & World Report, was fired Monday, capping months of disagreement with owner Mortimer B. Zuckerman over what kind of news should be featured in the magazine. Fallows will be succeeded by Stephen Smith, editor of the National Journal, a Washington-based weekly on government and politics, U.S. News editorial director Harold Evans announced later Monday.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Fallows, the high-profile editor of U.S. News & World Report, was fired Monday, capping months of disagreement with owner Mortimer B. Zuckerman over what kind of news should be featured in the magazine. Fallows will be succeeded by Stephen Smith, editor of the National Journal, a Washington-based weekly on government and politics, U.S. News editorial director Harold Evans announced later Monday.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The front wall of the U.S. News & World Report building is glass, a fragile housing for the magazine's new editor, James Fallows, who spent most of last spring throwing stones at his colleagues in the media. Fallows' best-selling book, "Breaking the News: How the Media Undermine American Democracy" (Pantheon Books, 1996), criticized many of his fellow journalists for becoming too rich, too egomaniacal, too pompous, too greedy, too simplistic and too negative.
NEWS
February 18, 1996 | BRIAN ALCORN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bob Dole is the old guy. Steve Forbes is the rich guy. Pat Buchanan is the mean guy. Lamar Alexander is the plaid guy. Bill Clinton is the guy who wants to keep his job. If this is the rough sum of your knowledge of the 1996 presidential race, you have no one to blame but yourself. Or, of course, the media.
BOOKS
February 4, 1996 | Alex Raksin, Alex Raksin is an assistant Book Review editor
Twenty years ago, the film "All the Presidents Men" projected a sexy image of journalists uncovering scandal for the common good. At the pinnacle of their popularity, they were perceived as democracy's champions, members of a fourth branch of government able to uphold the ideals that America's three other branches seemed too sagging to support. Since then, journalists have only stepped up their adversarial gait, looking more fervently than ever for corruption and impropriety.
BOOKS
August 7, 1994 | Andrew Horvat, The former Tokyo bureau chief for American Public Radio's "Marketplace," Andrew Horvat is a visiting scholar at Stanford University's Center for East Asian Studies
In "Looking at the Sun," James Fallows declares that the majority of Japan's nationally elected politicians are sons of politicians. The statement is one of many Fallows makes to warn American readers that Japan is not the democratic country they imagine it to be; it is also one of many that does not jibe with the facts.
MAGAZINE
May 8, 1994
I have just returned from an intense three-week tour of Southeast Asia and I was fascinated by the incredible insight in James Fallows' article ("Boom Times in Bangkok," April 10). It should be required reading for Warren Christopher and others running the State Department. Asia is indeed in the dynamic phase of its historical evolution. Given its boiling, restless entrepreneurial energy, the next century will indeed be an Asian one. JAY P. COOPER Newport Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By Matt Cooper
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Dec. 29, 2013 - Jan. 4, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SPECIALS WWE Tribute to the Troops Pro wrestling's brawlers and beauties are joined by rock music's Daughtry, ventriloquist Jeff Dunham and others in this annual salute to the men and women of the U.S. armed forces....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | VICTOR VALLE
Los Angeles, dubbed the cultural capital of the Pacific Rim, is in a unique position. But what kind of arts and culture will this city produce in the next decade and beyond? Calendar posed this and other questions to four writers and one researcher in the business of soothsaying: James Fallows, an Oxford and Harvard graduate who, for three years, has reported from Yokohama for The Atlantic.
BOOKS
March 26, 1989 | RICHARD EDER
James Fallows raises interesting questions about America's sense that it is losing energy and purpose in the face of harder-driving competitors such as Japan. Less interestingly, he answers them. Fallows is an incisive and provocative journalist, as he has shown in writing about Washington, national defense and the Far East for the Atlantic Magazine, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | VICTOR VALLE
Los Angeles, dubbed the cultural capital of the Pacific Rim, is in a unique position. But what kind of arts and culture will this city produce in the next decade and beyond? Calendar posed this and other questions to four writers and one researcher in the business of soothsaying: James Fallows, an Oxford and Harvard graduate who, for three years, has reported from Yokohama for The Atlantic.
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