Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Farmer
IN THE NEWS

James Farmer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | Associated Press
James Farmer, a civil rights leader who received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in January, was recovering Friday after surgery to have a blood clot removed from his brain. Farmer, 78, was in stable condition in the intensive care unit at Mary Washington Hospital, a spokeswoman said. Farmer is the last surviving member of the "Big Four" civil rights leaders, along with the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Whitney Young and Roy Wilkins.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 1999 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James S. Farmer, the last surviving member of the so-called Big Four civil rights giants of the 1950s and 1960s, died Friday in Virginia after years of illness. He was 79. The son of a preacher raised in Mississippi, Farmer helped found the Congress of Racial Equality in the early 1940s. He was considered one of the pillars of the early civil rights movement, along with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Roy Wilkins of the National Assn.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | HUGH A. MULLIGAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The distinguished visiting professor with the patch over his right eye tugs at a tweed sleeve and bends an ear to his chiming wristwatch. "Twenty-eight minutes past one," James Farmer announces in that resonant, mellifluous voice to a hushed class of 40 juniors and seniors, leaning forward, pens poised over notebooks. "As I was saying, those troopers were bellowing: 'Come on out, Farmer. We know you're in there.' "I was meant to die that night.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | Associated Press
James Farmer, a civil rights leader who received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in January, was recovering Friday after surgery to have a blood clot removed from his brain. Farmer, 78, was in stable condition in the intensive care unit at Mary Washington Hospital, a spokeswoman said. Farmer is the last surviving member of the "Big Four" civil rights leaders, along with the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Whitney Young and Roy Wilkins.
NEWS
July 10, 1999 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James S. Farmer, the last surviving member of the so-called Big Four civil rights giants of the 1950s and 1960s, died Friday in Virginia after years of illness. He was 79. The son of a preacher raised in Mississippi, Farmer helped found the Congress of Racial Equality in the early 1940s. He was considered one of the pillars of the early civil rights movement, along with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Roy Wilkins of the National Assn.
NEWS
November 29, 1988
Civil rights leader James Farmer said that blacks and Jews should keep working together for the "colorblind and religion-blind" society that was the original goal of the civil rights movement. Farmer, 68, former president of the Congress for Racial Equality, was one of 100 black and Jewish activists attending a two-day seminar at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Center at Atlanta.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | Associated Press
Civil rights leader James Farmer, 67, who was hospitalized for more than a week after a minor heart attack, was released Wednesday from Community Hospital.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
A society matron and a civil rights pioneer who led lunch-counter protests were honored by President Clinton with the nation's highest civilian award Thursday. Millionaire philanthropist Brooke Astor and activist James Farmer were among a number of Americans awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in a ceremony in the White House East Room. The presentation of medals occurred on the 69th anniversary of the birth of the late civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.
NATIONAL
July 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
The National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People is recommitting itself to fight ills still gripping black America as the nation's largest and oldest civil rights organization celebrates its 90th birthday. "This convention will be celebratory, but we will also be looking back towards the principles we were founded on," said Julian Bond, the NAACP's national board chairman. "It's nice to reminisce, but we can't afford not to keep looking forward."
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | HUGH A. MULLIGAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The distinguished visiting professor with the patch over his right eye tugs at a tweed sleeve and bends an ear to his chiming wristwatch. "Twenty-eight minutes past one," James Farmer announces in that resonant, mellifluous voice to a hushed class of 40 juniors and seniors, leaning forward, pens poised over notebooks. "As I was saying, those troopers were bellowing: 'Come on out, Farmer. We know you're in there.' "I was meant to die that night.
NEWS
November 29, 1988
Civil rights leader James Farmer said that blacks and Jews should keep working together for the "colorblind and religion-blind" society that was the original goal of the civil rights movement. Farmer, 68, former president of the Congress for Racial Equality, was one of 100 black and Jewish activists attending a two-day seminar at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Center at Atlanta.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2007 | Robert W. Welkos
Call it a blessing. That's how 17-year-old Denzel Whitaker describes being cast alongside his namesake, Denzel Washington, in "The Great Debaters." "My dad and mom named me after Denzel," he explains. "They thought it was a unique name." Whitaker, for the record, is a pretty unique teenager.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|