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James Flanigan

BUSINESS
September 14, 1997
In "Taking a More Practical Approach to Biomedicine" (James Flanigan, June 18), it was reported that the Whitaker Foundation had made a $14-million grant to the University of California, Los Angeles, to support an education program of the medical and engineering schools. The foundation has not made such a grant to UCLA. FRANK BLANCHARD Director of Communications Whitaker Foundation Rosslyn, Va.
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BUSINESS
April 20, 1997
James Flanigan usually gets it right. He accurately recites the position of Mayor Beverly O'Neill and a group of entrepreneurs regarding the development of Long Beach (" 'Burbs of a Feather," March 12). Don't view Long Beach as a separate community, but as just a place between Los Angeles and Orange County with an oceanfront and port. Put the vast majority of funds in a small area of downtown and hope for a rush of tourist business. We have been waiting for this tourist revenue for the last 20 years.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1996
Although I am a great fan of James Flanigan, I am dismayed by his assessment of Proposition 211 as "anti-business" ("What Anti-Business Measures Say About Us," Oct. 9). In fact, Proposition 211 aims to protect capital, the indispensable first element of business. Proposition 211 will add protection to the pension funds, private and public, that supply most of the capital for this nation as of 1996. How protecting the purveyors of capital from fraud can be "anti-business" is a mystery.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Times on Thursday named Bill Sing business editor and appointed business columnist James Flanigan to the newly created post of senior economics editor. Sing, who had been deputy business editor since 1991, succeeds Robert Magnuson, who was recently named president of the newspaper's Orange County Edition and a vice president of The Times.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1996
James Flanigan's analysis of inconsistencies in the economy ("A Contradictory Economy Driven by Steady Investors," Jan. 14) cites the breakdown in recent years of contractual relations between employers and workers. He also says such issues "will work themselves out in this adaptable economy." Flanigan fails to acknowledge the critical "contradiction" that fuels inequities facing American employees who could once rely on the security of jobs guaranteeing a middle-class standard of living.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1995
In "On Affirmative Action, School Is by No Means Out" (June 18), James Flanigan states, "Still, it would have been better if, like returning World War II and Korean War veterans, Vietnam vets had been given a GI Bill of Rights, with money for education or to start a business or buy a home." In 1972 when I was attending college, there were many Vietnam vets on campus, myself included. Did I miss something in the article, or did Mr. Flanigan fail to do his research? WILLIAM T. DAVIS Pomona James Flanigan admits to being out of step on this issue.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1995
"Time to Fix the Retirement System Before It's Broke" (April 2), by James Flanigan, is interesting, but it misses an important point. The retirement system is broke. Beginning with the Employee Income Security Act in 1974, Congress has seen fit to pass more than two dozen laws discouraging employers from providing retirement plans for employees. If that is not enough, the bureaucrats have issued thousands upon thousands of pages of regulations making employer-sponsored retirement plans even more unattractive.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1994
James Flanigan has raised the Times' call of victimization in the Orange County fiscal debacle to a new level ("California's Faulty Tax System May Be at Bankruptcy's Root," Dec. 14). The unfortunate thing is that he distinctly misses identifying the victims. To clarify the situation, there is definitive fault to be placed. County Treasurer Robert L. Citron was well aware of what he was doing. He is a sophisticated investment manager. He advised other bureaucrats and agency managers to risk public funds to increase the amount of monies they had to expend within their domain.
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