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James Franciscus

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Franciscus, the virile actor whose talents enabled him to portray characters ranging from flinty cops to affable teachers, died late Monday night. Franciscus died of emphysema at Medical Center of North Hollywood, said his friend and publicist Phil Paladino. Franciscus was 57 and had been a longtime smoker, Paladino added. In addition to being one of television's best-known faces during the 1950s and '60s, Franciscus was a TV producer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Franciscus, the virile actor whose talents enabled him to portray characters ranging from flinty cops to affable teachers, died late Monday night. Franciscus died of emphysema at Medical Center of North Hollywood, said his friend and publicist Phil Paladino. Franciscus was 57 and had been a longtime smoker, Paladino added. In addition to being one of television's best-known faces during the 1950s and '60s, Franciscus was a TV producer.
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NEWS
August 27, 1994
Phil Paladino, 63, Hollywood publicist for such stars as Bob Hope, Zsa Zsa and Eva Gabor, Dick Clark and Debbie Reynolds. Born in Kansas City, Mo., Paladino served four years in the Navy before earning a speech and drama degree at the University of Missouri. He broke into the entertainment business in New York promoting early rock 'n' roll musicians such as Fabian, Connie Francis and Bobby Rydell.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Veteran character actor Dean Jagger, who won a best supporting Oscar for 1949's "Twelve O'Clock High," died at his Santa Monica home today, his wife said. He was 87. Etta Jagger said that her husband had been recovering from the flu. He died in his sleep this morning, she said. Mrs. Jagger said her husband acted in more than 150 movies, including "White Christmas," "Bad Day at Black Rock" and "Elmer Gantry."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
All those intricate plot twists in last week's acclaimed CBS movie "Vanishing Act"--written by "Columbo" creators Richard Levinson and William Link--couldn't hide the fact that this one had been seen before. And before. And. . . . In fact, the Mike Farrell-Elliott Gould-Margot Kidder mystery, about a husband who reports his wife missing and later claims that the woman who finally shows up isn't his wife, is the fourth adaptation of Robert Thomas' old play, "Trap For a Lonely Man."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas D. Tannenbaum, whose four decades in television production, development and packaging included seven years as the first president of Viacom Productions, where he spearheaded such series as "Matlock" and the "Father Dowling Mysteries," has died. He was 69. Tannenbaum died of heart and liver failure Saturday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991 | SUSAN KING
Frank Pesce loves happy endings. In fact, he loves them so much he altered the truth about himself in the new film "29th Street." According to "29th Street," which chronicles the rather charmed life of the New York-born Italian-American, Pesce won over $6 million 15 years ago in the first New York State Lottery. The truth of the matter is, Pesce didn't win a dime. "It's the only part of the movie that isn't true," says Pesce, who also appears in "29th Street," as his own brother, Vito.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Susan King
The American Cinematheque and the Visual Effects Society are joining forces next month to pay homage to the pioneering stop-motion special effects wizard Ray Harryhausen, who died in London on May 7 at age 92. “The King of Stop-Motion: Ray Harryhausen Remembered” opens June 6 at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica with 1958's “The 7th Voyage of Sinbad,” directed by Nathan Juran and starring Kerwin Matthews and Kathryn Grant, who became...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Herbert B. Leonard, a film and television producer who brought "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" and the classic TV dramatic series "Naked City" and "Route 66" to television in the 1950s and '60s, has died. He was 84. Leonard died of cancer Saturday at his home in the Hollywood Hills, said his daughter Gina Leonard.
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