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James Frey

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NEWS
April 21, 2011 | Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
Yes, Oprah Winfrey famously went on the attack against James Frey when he admitted that he fabricated certain details of his bestselling memoir, "A Million Little Pieces," but Frey is ready to make nice: He will appear on one of Winfrey's final shows in May for a full hour to discuss his novel "The Final Testament of the Holy Bible," Winfrey's spokeswoman confirmed on Thursday. Winfrey reportedly apologized to Frey after she repeatedly lambasted him for being dishonest, triggering such a public backlash against him that he fled to France soon afterward.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Author James Frey has had his ups and downs. Consider this an up. Deadline reports that Frey has sold a new book to HarperCollins, "Endgame," along with film rights to 20th Century Fox. The screen deal is for a rumored $2 million to $2.5 million , and is said to include Frey writing the screenplay. Frey is the author of "A Million Little Pieces," the 2003 memoir that turned out to be not particularly true. The book was publicly embraced by Oprah; after news of its fabrications came to light, she publicly chastised Frey on her show.
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BOOKS
May 18, 2003 | Jeff Turrentine, Jeff Turrentine is an essayist and critic whose work has appeared in Book Review, the New York Times Magazine, Architectural Digest and Slate.com.
By the time he reached the legal drinking age, James Frey had already been profoundly addicted to alcohol for more than half a decade; if he wasn't drunk, which wasn't often, he was sniffing glue, inhaling gas fumes or smoking crack.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Joan Didion had it right. In her 1976 essay “Why I Write,” originally published in the New York Times Book Review, she lays out the template in no uncertain terms: “In many ways writing is the act of saying I , of imposing oneself upon other people, of saying listen to me, see it my way, change your mind . It's an aggressive, even a hostile act. You can disguise its qualifiers and tentative subjunctives, with ellipses and evasions -...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2008 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
James FREY was back in his old neighborhood, strolling happily along the Venice boardwalk, enjoying a sunny day in a T-shirt and aviator shades as he passed tattoo shops and a man who was selling what he claimed to be "philosophy." It doesn't get any better than this, Frey's body language seemed to say. "This," Frey, 38, said. "This doesn't exist in New York. This weather -- it's like this in Venice all year. Never that hot here because of the ocean. I mean, dude, every day -- all year."
BUSINESS
January 31, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Author James Frey and Random House Inc.'s Doubleday unit were sued by readers who bought "A Million Little Pieces" because the purported true story of Frey's struggle with drug addiction and crime was fabricated. Separate lawsuits accusing Random House of negligence were filed in New York and Seattle. The Seattle complaint, which also names Frey, seeks damages for the money readers spent on the book and for the time spent reading it. Doubleday spokesman Russell Perreault declined to comment.
OPINION
January 15, 2006
Re "Truisms of publishing," editorial, Jan. 12 My daughter and I read "A Million Little Pieces." It is a painful account of an addict and the countless losses the lifestyle promises. The despair I felt while reading it made me wish it were required reading in high schools. That author James Frey made some false claims in his memoir is not important. CATHERINE GOLDSCHLAGER Studio City
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
James Frey is writing a new book, and this time he's calling it fiction. The author of the notorious "A Million Little Pieces," the addiction memoir he acknowledged largely fabricating, will have a novel released in summer 2008 by HarperCollins, "Bright Shiny Morning," described as a "kaleidoscopic" portrait of modern Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Joan Didion had it right. In her 1976 essay “Why I Write,” originally published in the New York Times Book Review, she lays out the template in no uncertain terms: “In many ways writing is the act of saying I , of imposing oneself upon other people, of saying listen to me, see it my way, change your mind . It's an aggressive, even a hostile act. You can disguise its qualifiers and tentative subjunctives, with ellipses and evasions -...
NEWS
February 2, 2006 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
UNDER fire from Oprah Winfrey as well as his publisher, and cut loose by his agent, author James Frey has written a lengthy "note to the reader" that Random House will include in subsequent editions of "A Million Little Pieces" explaining how and why his memoir veered away from the facts of his experience in a drug and alcohol treatment center.
OPINION
March 22, 2012 | Meghan Daum
Even if you don't have a cupboard full of pledge-drive coffee mugs, you've probably heard about the latest dust-up in public radio. A stage performer named Mike Daisey chronicled a trip he made in 2010 to China to check out conditions at a factory run by Foxconn, the chief manufacturer of iPads and iPhones. Even before Daisey told his tale, news reports of suicides and harsh working conditions there had introduced at least a dose of guilt into the previously sunshiny experience of owning an Apple product.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
Yes, Oprah Winfrey famously went on the attack against James Frey when he admitted that he fabricated certain details of his bestselling memoir, "A Million Little Pieces," but Frey is ready to make nice: He will appear on one of Winfrey's final shows in May for a full hour to discuss his novel "The Final Testament of the Holy Bible," Winfrey's spokeswoman confirmed on Thursday. Winfrey reportedly apologized to Frey after she repeatedly lambasted him for being dishonest, triggering such a public backlash against him that he fled to France soon afterward.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2008 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
James FREY was back in his old neighborhood, strolling happily along the Venice boardwalk, enjoying a sunny day in a T-shirt and aviator shades as he passed tattoo shops and a man who was selling what he claimed to be "philosophy." It doesn't get any better than this, Frey's body language seemed to say. "This," Frey, 38, said. "This doesn't exist in New York. This weather -- it's like this in Venice all year. Never that hot here because of the ocean. I mean, dude, every day -- all year."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2008 | AL MARTINEZ
Ever since Clifford Irving popularized literary lying by faking the autobiography of billionaire Howard Hughes, the presentation of fiction as nonfiction has reemerged as yet another method of writing and selling a book. Although it wasn't the first time an author used fakery as a ladder to publication, Irving had the bad judgment to get his book published while its subject was still alive, more or less, and able to declare that it was all a bunch of crapola. The revelation sent Irving to prison for 17 months and forced him to return a $750,000 advance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
James Frey is writing a new book, and this time he's calling it fiction. The author of the notorious "A Million Little Pieces," the addiction memoir he acknowledged largely fabricating, will have a novel released in summer 2008 by HarperCollins, "Bright Shiny Morning," described as a "kaleidoscopic" portrait of modern Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Random House and author James Frey have reached an agreement in principle to pay up to $2.35 million in refunds to readers who believe they were "misled" by the marketing of Frey's fraudulent memoir, "A Million Little Pieces," the publishing giant announced Friday. Under a deal given preliminary approval by Manhattan Federal Judge Richard Holwell, readers who submit valid claims will get a full refund, unless other expenses -- such as attorney's fees and other costs -- exceed $2.35 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Memoirist James Frey and Random House Inc. have agreed in principle to settle lawsuits filed by readers who said they were defrauded by fabrications in Frey's million-selling book, "A Million Little Pieces," the publisher said. "I can confirm that we have an agreement in principle," David Drake, a spokesman for the Random House imprint Doubleday, said Thursday. "However, it requires court approval and may take several weeks and even months."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Is James Frey's "My Friend Leonard," the sequel to his discredited "A Million Little Pieces," fact or fiction? In an author's note in the paperback edition, which has just come out, Frey says it's some of both. "To call this book pure nonfiction would be inaccurate," the author writes. "It is a combination of fact and fiction, real and imagined events."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2007 | By David Henry Hwang, Special to The Times
WE live in a time when reality has evidently trumped fiction. The novel loses readers, as narrative nonfiction and memoirs gain in popularity. Reality television, once derided as a fad, is apparently here to stay. Young people abandon the so-called old media to post anecdotes from their lives and videos of their activities online. In theater, docudramas, in which quotes from real people are dramatized, have become more present on our stages. Today, truth is not only stranger than fiction, it also seems to be more popular.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Memoirist James Frey and Random House Inc. have agreed in principle to settle lawsuits filed by readers who said they were defrauded by fabrications in Frey's million-selling book, "A Million Little Pieces," the publisher said. "I can confirm that we have an agreement in principle," David Drake, a spokesman for the Random House imprint Doubleday, said Thursday. "However, it requires court approval and may take several weeks and even months."
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