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James Gavin

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2009 | Susan King
According to James Gavin's new biography, "Stormy Weather: The Life of Lena Horne," the legendary singer-actress was never comfortable being an icon. "As I say in the introduction of my book, icons are not allowed to be human beings," explains Gavin, a lifelong fan who interviewed Horne in 1994. "Once you step up on that pedestal . . . and everyone is scrutinizing your every move -- how do you function as a human being? You have to cover up mistakes you made."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2009 | Susan King
According to James Gavin's new biography, "Stormy Weather: The Life of Lena Horne," the legendary singer-actress was never comfortable being an icon. "As I say in the introduction of my book, icons are not allowed to be human beings," explains Gavin, a lifelong fan who interviewed Horne in 1994. "Once you step up on that pedestal . . . and everyone is scrutinizing your every move -- how do you function as a human being? You have to cover up mistakes you made."
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NEWS
May 11, 1990 | DAN LOGAN, Dan Logan is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Are certain personalities attracted to specific sports? Yes, says James Gavin, a professor of applied social science at Concordia University in Montreal. Our personalities affect our choice of sports, our willingness to participate in a sport and how we perform in the sport. Which may explain why you're gagging on your weekly regimen of running, aerobics or yoga. "There are certain emotional qualities reinforced by the choice of exercise, and within that exercise," Gavin says.
BOOKS
May 12, 2002 | JULIUS LESTER, Julius Lester is the author of numerous books, including "When Dad Killed Mom," and teaches Judaic studies and history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
When I was in high school, there was a small group of us who liked jazz. I don't recall how we discovered it in the Nashville, Tenn., of the mid-1950s, but in the sounds of the Count Basie Orchestra, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Clifford Brown and Max Roach we heard statements about living that were far different from those in the banjos and steel guitars of the country music for which Nashville was famous.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | Associated Press
Retired Lt. Gen. James M. Gavin, one of the youngest generals in World War II, died Friday, the Pentagon said. Gavin, 82, died at a nursing home in the Baltimore area, Pentagon spokesman Maj. Bill O'Connell said. O'Connell said he had no further details. Gavin commanded the 82nd Airborne Division and jumped with the troops in several of its wartime assaults. He won his two stars as a major general when he was 37.
BOOKS
May 12, 2002 | JULIUS LESTER, Julius Lester is the author of numerous books, including "When Dad Killed Mom," and teaches Judaic studies and history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
When I was in high school, there was a small group of us who liked jazz. I don't recall how we discovered it in the Nashville, Tenn., of the mid-1950s, but in the sounds of the Count Basie Orchestra, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Clifford Brown and Max Roach we heard statements about living that were far different from those in the banjos and steel guitars of the country music for which Nashville was famous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2005 | Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writer
Gen. William C. Westmoreland, the World War II hero who was later vilified for his leadership of the United States' failed war in Vietnam, died Monday night in Charleston, S.C. He was 91. Westmoreland died of natural causes at Bishop Gadsden retirement home, his son, James Ripley Westmoreland, told Associated Press. Jut-jawed and ramrod straight, strong-willed but soft-spoken, the spit-and-polish Westmoreland projected the quintessential image of an American military leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2006 | Lance Pugmire and Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writers
More than 750 law enforcement officials conducted sweeps in five counties Thursday, aimed at breaking the back of the Vagos Motorcycle Club, an organization founded in the 1960s that authorities say is tied to dealing drugs and weapons. Twenty-two people were arrested in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside, Orange and Ventura counties, culminating a three-year investigation aimed at curtailing the operations of the Vagos organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2002
Two important jazz books that Don Heckman failed to note (Jazz Spotlight, Jan. 6): a history of the Blue Note label by U.K. author Richard Cook titled "Blue Note Records--The Biography" (Secker & Warburg, London, 2001); and the long-anticipated biography of Chet Baker by New York author James Gavin, "Deep in a Dream," due in April from Random House. JAMES A. HARROD Laguna Beach
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A veteran movie stunt pilot testified Wednesday that if he had been subjected to special-effects explosives similar to those detonated in the sequence preceding the fatal "Twilight Zone" crash, "I'd take my helicopter and go home."
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | DAN LOGAN, Dan Logan is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Are certain personalities attracted to specific sports? Yes, says James Gavin, a professor of applied social science at Concordia University in Montreal. Our personalities affect our choice of sports, our willingness to participate in a sport and how we perform in the sport. Which may explain why you're gagging on your weekly regimen of running, aerobics or yoga. "There are certain emotional qualities reinforced by the choice of exercise, and within that exercise," Gavin says.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | Associated Press
Retired Lt. Gen. James M. Gavin, one of the youngest generals in World War II, died Friday, the Pentagon said. Gavin, 82, died at a nursing home in the Baltimore area, Pentagon spokesman Maj. Bill O'Connell said. O'Connell said he had no further details. Gavin commanded the 82nd Airborne Division and jumped with the troops in several of its wartime assaults. He won his two stars as a major general when he was 37.
BOOKS
February 11, 1996 | Lynell George
CLAXOGRAPHY, THE ART OF JAZZ PHOTOGRAPHY photographs by William Claxton, with texts by William Claxton and James Gavin (Nieswand Verlag, distributed by DAP: $65; 132 pp.) Too often the term "stolen moments" finds itself tossed around in conjunction with jazz photography. It's an easy cliche that is not only dismissing but tacitly imprecise--especially in reference to William Claxton, who subtly eases past many jazz conventions. He insists on bending the cliche, twisting the irony.
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