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December 1, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican Chairman James S. Gilmore on Friday announced plans to quit his post, following two key GOP losses last month and amid worsening relations with White House political operatives. Gilmore, whose term as governor of Virginia also is ending, said he will leave the helm of the Republican National Committee in January to reduce the burden that travel placed on his family. Others said clashes with White House political counselor Karl Rove influenced his decision.
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NEWS
December 1, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican Chairman James S. Gilmore on Friday announced plans to quit his post, following two key GOP losses last month and amid worsening relations with White House political operatives. Gilmore, whose term as governor of Virginia also is ending, said he will leave the helm of the Republican National Committee in January to reduce the burden that travel placed on his family. Others said clashes with White House political counselor Karl Rove influenced his decision.
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NEWS
August 27, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
"The more optimistic candidate is going to win, the one still laughing on the last weekend of the campaign," Virginia gubernatorial candidate Don Beyer told supporters last week at a restaurant in this Washington suburb. But the campaign's course is making it difficult for Beyer, the state's incumbent lieutenant governor, to maintain his normally sunny outlook.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | From the Washington Post
President-elect George W. Bush has picked Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore, a tough-minded, tax-cutting conservative with a talent for raising money, to become the chairman of the Republican National Committee, according to party sources. The announcement will be made today in Austin, Texas, sources in Richmond said. Gilmore's selection must be ratified by the RNC next month.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | From the Washington Post
President-elect George W. Bush has picked Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore, a tough-minded, tax-cutting conservative with a talent for raising money, to become the chairman of the Republican National Committee, according to party sources. The announcement will be made today in Austin, Texas, sources in Richmond said. Gilmore's selection must be ratified by the RNC next month.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Air Force Academy's oversight board, criticized for failing to note an increase in sexual assaults and allegedly punishing victims for reporting them, is now reviewing academy affairs closely, said James Gilmore, the board chairman. Gilmore, the former governor of Virginia, said in a phone interview that he discussed disciplinary cases last week with academy Supt. Lt. Gen. John Rosa. The board meets Tuesday in Washington, D.C.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
Outgoing House Speaker Newt Gingrich appointed a Californian and four others last week to the Advisory Commission on Electronic Commerce, a new board established by the Internet Tax Freedom Act. Dean Andal, chairman of the California State Board of Equalization, joined the 19-member advisory board, which will study issues related to taxes and tariffs on Internet access and online transactions.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
DNA tests sought by a Virginia death row inmate hoping to avert his execution Thursday may instead have sealed his fate by confirming that his blood was under the victim's fingernails. Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore rejected the clemency petition of condemned murderer Derek Barnabei, 33, citing DNA tests on fingernail clippings taken seven years ago from the body of Barnabei's 17-year-old girlfriend, Sarah Wisnosky.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. James S. Gilmore signed a bill eliminating Virginia's strict deadline for inmates to produce new genetic evidence of their innocence. The previous limit, giving inmates only 21 days after sentencing to bring up new evidence, was the nation's most restrictive. The new law contains no limit on the time required to produce new DNA evidence. Gilmore, a Republican who took office in 1998, had wanted inmates to have three years after sentencing to bring up new evidence on genetic testing.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright asked Virginia's governor to block today's execution of a death-row inmate from Paraguay, saying she was concerned about the "potential harm" to Americans abroad. Albright made the request in a letter to Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore. A spokesman said the governor was reviewing the request.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
"The more optimistic candidate is going to win, the one still laughing on the last weekend of the campaign," Virginia gubernatorial candidate Don Beyer told supporters last week at a restaurant in this Washington suburb. But the campaign's course is making it difficult for Beyer, the state's incumbent lieutenant governor, to maintain his normally sunny outlook.
NEWS
February 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Virginia Senate passed a bill to require women seeking abortions to wait 24 hours after seeing a doctor before the procedure can be performed. The measure has passed the state House, and Gov. James S. Gilmore has said he will sign it into law. Supporters said it would not restrict a woman's choice but rather would provide her with a right to fully understand what abortion means.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Elizabeth Hanford Dole's hopes for the Republican Senate nomination in North Carolina brightened last week. Former Charlotte Mayor Richard Vinroot, who had vowed to fight her for the prize, gave up his bid and endorsed Dole. "This is a necessary sacrifice for the good of our party, our state and our nation," said Vinroot. Vinroot announced his decision after Republican National Committee Chairman and Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore urged him to step aside in a Nov. 3 telephone call.
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