Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Grant
IN THE NEWS

James Grant

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 30, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James P. Grant, who devoted his life to low- cost health care for the children of the world, died Saturday, two days after resigning as executive director of UNICEF. Grant, who won the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his efforts to improve the plight of children, was 72. The cause of death was cancer, according to a statement from the United Nations Children's Fund. It said he died at a hospital in Mt. Kisco, N.Y.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
That's the question raised by James Grant in a Washington Post op-ed , and his answer -- as anyone who knows Grant might expect -- is yes. His real point is that it happens all the time, in a way, and will inevitably happen in the future. "On the authority of the chairman of the Federal Reserve Board," he writes, "the government means to keep right on shirking, dodging or trimming, if not legally defaulting. " It's an important issue, because of how many Republican congressmen seem to think a default on the U.S. debt wouldn't be a big deal.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 4, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Merger activity is up. Leveraged buyouts are back. The "junk bond" business, though now slower than before October, still hums along. The financial world's partial recuperation from the October stock market crash has shaken the faith of many who had foreseen disaster in the heavy-borrowing, free-spending ways of American business. But the convictions of James Grant remain firm.
BOOKS
March 13, 2005 | John Rhodehamel, John Rhodehamel is the Norris Foundation curator at the Huntington Library and editor of "George Washington: Writings" and "The American Revolution: Writings From the War of Independence," both from the Library of America.
Americans are eager to read about the original "greatest generation," Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, George Washington and John Adams, as well as some of the lesser lights in the constellation who won the Revolution, drafted the Constitution and inaugurated a government that has endured for more than 200 years. Popular interest in the founding era is certainly greater today than at the time of the noisy observances of the 1776 bicentennial nearly three decades ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1989 | From Reuters
James Grant, executive director of the U.N. Children's Fund (UNICEF) since 1980, was reappointed Monday for another five-year term beginning next Jan. 1.
NEWS
May 9, 1989
The United Nations says it has moved enough food aid to southern Sudan to prevent the deaths of thousands of people who faced starvation because farming there has been disrupted by civil war. James Grant, head of the U.N.'s Operation Lifeline Sudan, told a news conference in Kenya that 45,000 tons of food has been rushed to southern Sudan since March. Another 45,000 tons is expected to be moved in before the end of June. Although this is still 30,000 tons short of the goal, Grant said that "we appear to be in a position to avoid any massive deaths."
BUSINESS
December 6, 1993 | TOM PETRUNO
Can inflation make a comeback in the '90s? Most Wall Streeters say no. James Grant begs to differ. Grant, who writes Grant's Interest Rate Observer newsletter in New York, made his mark in the '80s by predicting the asset deflation, bank ruin and junk bond collapse that ended that decade and kicked off the sober '90s. Widely appreciated on Wall Street for his wit and insight on the market's machinations, Grant also is interesting because his views usually run counter to the crowd's.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
That's the question raised by James Grant in a Washington Post op-ed , and his answer -- as anyone who knows Grant might expect -- is yes. His real point is that it happens all the time, in a way, and will inevitably happen in the future. "On the authority of the chairman of the Federal Reserve Board," he writes, "the government means to keep right on shirking, dodging or trimming, if not legally defaulting. " It's an important issue, because of how many Republican congressmen seem to think a default on the U.S. debt wouldn't be a big deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1990
James Grant Kahlo, who began his acting career in silent films and played a regular part in the Renaissance Pleasure Faire, has died at his Van Nuys home. He was 81. For the past 20 years, Kahlo played a guild-master at the annual fair that moved last year from Agoura to the Glen Haven Regional Park in San Bernardino County. He died July 9 of natural causes, said his sister, Margaret Kahlo. Born April 16, 1909, in Los Angeles, Kahlo began his acting career at the age of 6.
BOOKS
March 13, 2005 | John Rhodehamel, John Rhodehamel is the Norris Foundation curator at the Huntington Library and editor of "George Washington: Writings" and "The American Revolution: Writings From the War of Independence," both from the Library of America.
Americans are eager to read about the original "greatest generation," Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, George Washington and John Adams, as well as some of the lesser lights in the constellation who won the Revolution, drafted the Constitution and inaugurated a government that has endured for more than 200 years. Popular interest in the founding era is certainly greater today than at the time of the noisy observances of the 1776 bicentennial nearly three decades ago.
NEWS
January 30, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James P. Grant, who devoted his life to low- cost health care for the children of the world, died Saturday, two days after resigning as executive director of UNICEF. Grant, who won the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his efforts to improve the plight of children, was 72. The cause of death was cancer, according to a statement from the United Nations Children's Fund. It said he died at a hospital in Mt. Kisco, N.Y.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1993 | TOM PETRUNO
Can inflation make a comeback in the '90s? Most Wall Streeters say no. James Grant begs to differ. Grant, who writes Grant's Interest Rate Observer newsletter in New York, made his mark in the '80s by predicting the asset deflation, bank ruin and junk bond collapse that ended that decade and kicked off the sober '90s. Widely appreciated on Wall Street for his wit and insight on the market's machinations, Grant also is interesting because his views usually run counter to the crowd's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1990
James Grant Kahlo, who began his acting career in silent films and played a regular part in the Renaissance Pleasure Faire, has died at his Van Nuys home. He was 81. For the past 20 years, Kahlo played a guild-master at the annual fair that moved last year from Agoura to the Glen Haven Regional Park in San Bernardino County. He died July 9 of natural causes, said his sister, Margaret Kahlo. Born April 16, 1909, in Los Angeles, Kahlo began his acting career at the age of 6.
NEWS
May 9, 1989
The United Nations says it has moved enough food aid to southern Sudan to prevent the deaths of thousands of people who faced starvation because farming there has been disrupted by civil war. James Grant, head of the U.N.'s Operation Lifeline Sudan, told a news conference in Kenya that 45,000 tons of food has been rushed to southern Sudan since March. Another 45,000 tons is expected to be moved in before the end of June. Although this is still 30,000 tons short of the goal, Grant said that "we appear to be in a position to avoid any massive deaths."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1989 | From Reuters
James Grant, executive director of the U.N. Children's Fund (UNICEF) since 1980, was reappointed Monday for another five-year term beginning next Jan. 1.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Merger activity is up. Leveraged buyouts are back. The "junk bond" business, though now slower than before October, still hums along. The financial world's partial recuperation from the October stock market crash has shaken the faith of many who had foreseen disaster in the heavy-borrowing, free-spending ways of American business. But the convictions of James Grant remain firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
Wal-Mart heiress Elizabeth Paige Laurie, accused of paying a fellow college student $20,000 to do her homework, has returned her USC degree, officials said. The move came nearly a year after Laurie's freshman-year roommate, Elena Martinez, told the ABC newsmagazine "20/20" that she had written term papers and done assignments for the heiress for 3 1/2 years. "Paige Laurie voluntarily has surrendered her degree and returned her diploma to the university.
MAGAZINE
August 17, 1986 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Michael A. Hiltzik is a Times financial writer based in New York
The financial page is howling about yet another corporate raid, one more takeover at tempt destined to produce nothing much more lasting than speculation, creative financing, a raft of lawsuits and millions for the Wall Street types to whom value is something expressed in a blinking green light on a Quotron machine.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|