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James H Billington

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NEWS
November 15, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President-elect George Bush plans to announce his choice for Treasury secretary today amid strong indications that he has decided to retain longtime friend and adviser Nicholas F. Brady in the post, sources close to Bush said Monday evening. As Bush neared an announcement on the second person to join his Cabinet, he had dinner Monday with New Hampshire Gov. John H. Sununu at a borrowed vacation home in Gulf Stream, Fla.
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MAGAZINE
November 15, 1992 | BILL THOMAS, Bill Thomas, a frequent contributor to this magazine, is the co-author of "Red Tape: Adventure Capitalism in the New Russia," recently published by Dutton
If the gathering of Washington luminaries at the Library of Congress last year had been a book, the cataloguing department would have shelved it under U.S. History, Wars . . . Cold. The occasion was a dinner honoring the late W. Averell Harriman, American ambassador to Moscow in the 1940s. The timing, a few months after the failed Kremlin coup, could not have been better. So many of Harriman's colleagues from the crusade against communism were there that it seemed like a victory party.
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MAGAZINE
November 15, 1992 | BILL THOMAS, Bill Thomas, a frequent contributor to this magazine, is the co-author of "Red Tape: Adventure Capitalism in the New Russia," recently published by Dutton
If the gathering of Washington luminaries at the Library of Congress last year had been a book, the cataloguing department would have shelved it under U.S. History, Wars . . . Cold. The occasion was a dinner honoring the late W. Averell Harriman, American ambassador to Moscow in the 1940s. The timing, a few months after the failed Kremlin coup, could not have been better. So many of Harriman's colleagues from the crusade against communism were there that it seemed like a victory party.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA and NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writers
Fifty years after first setting foot in town, Mr. Smith has come to Washington again. The 1939 film classic "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" was among 25 movies cited Tuesday as American movie treasures by the Library of Congress. The move was designed to bring attention to the fragility of the medium and spur wider efforts to protect its finest exemplars. The proposal to designate certain films as "national treasures" grew out of the controversy over colorizing black-and-white films.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA and NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writers
Fifty years after first setting foot in town, Mr. Smith has come to Washington again. The 1939 film classic "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" was among 25 movies cited Tuesday as American movie treasures by the Library of Congress. The move was designed to bring attention to the fragility of the medium and spur wider efforts to protect its finest exemplars. The proposal to designate certain films as "national treasures" grew out of the controversy over colorizing black-and-white films.
NEWS
September 14, 1987 | Associated Press
James H. Billington, a historian like his predecessor, became the 13th Librarian of Congress today and declared that the library he will head is destined to be "not just a mausoleum for culture but a catalyst for civilization." Billington, 58, director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars since 1973, was sworn in by Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
Librarian of Congress James H. Billington announced this week that children's author Jon Scieszka ("The Stinky Cheese Man," "Time Warp Trio"), founder of the nonprofit Guys Read literacy organization, will serve a two-year term as the first National Ambassador for Young People's Literature. The position was created to raise awareness of the importance of such literature in relation to lifelong literacy, education and the development and betterment of the lives of young people.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2002 | Jon Healey
Twenty members of the House of Representatives urged Librarian of Congress James H. Billington to set lower royalty rates for online radio broadcasts than a copyright arbitration panel recommended in February. The letter to Billington, which came in response to protests from online broadcasters, says Congress wanted to compensate copyright holders without stifling "the media promise of the Internet, including the opportunity for new cultural and competitive programming."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2004 | From the Washington Post
Yale historian Jaroslav Pelikan and French philosopher Paul Ricoeur are winners of the Library of Congress' second John W. Kluge Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Human Sciences. The two scholars will share the $1-million award, announced Monday by Librarian of Congress James H. Billington. The awards ceremony will be held Dec. 8 at the Washington-based library. The prize, named for media magnate Kluge, honors achievement in the humanities and social sciences.
WORLD
December 1, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. and Iranian officials have signed an agreement to share library materials, giving scholars in America their first access to such items from Iran since Islamic militants took over the U.S. Embassy there in 1979. Librarian of Congress James H. Billington traveled to Iran to sign the agreement. Political relations between the two countries are poor because of Tehran's nuclear program, which the United States alleges is meant to develop weapons but Iran insists is solely for energy.
NEWS
November 15, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President-elect George Bush plans to announce his choice for Treasury secretary today amid strong indications that he has decided to retain longtime friend and adviser Nicholas F. Brady in the post, sources close to Bush said Monday evening. As Bush neared an announcement on the second person to join his Cabinet, he had dinner Monday with New Hampshire Gov. John H. Sununu at a borrowed vacation home in Gulf Stream, Fla.
NATIONAL
August 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Great Plains poet Ted Kooser of Lincoln will be the next poet laureate of the United States. Librarian of Congress James H. Billington said Kooser, 65, will replace Pulitzer Prize winner Louise Gluck in the one-year position. "Ted Kooser is a major poetic voice for rural and small town America and the first poet laureate chosen from the Great Plains," Billington said. "His verse reaches beyond his native region to touch on universal themes in accessible ways."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1997
The life story of William Tyndale (1494-1536) and his persistence in creating the first printed English translation of the New Testament are told in an exhibit on display at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., through Sept. 6. "By integrating history, theology and literature, this exhibition tells the history of English-language Bibles and the remarkable story of the life and work of English priest William Tyndale," said Librarian of Congress James H. Billington.
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