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James H Doolittle

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walter Kurilchyk didn't know what he got himself into when an aviation hobby turned into an obsessive search for the last remaining B-25 airplane from the late Gen. Jimmy Doolittle's fabled 1942 bombing raid on Tokyo. "It started in about 1980," Kurilchyk recalled. "It was just a hobby then."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walter Kurilchyk didn't know what he got himself into when an aviation hobby turned into an obsessive search for the last remaining B-25 airplane from the late Gen. Jimmy Doolittle's fabled 1942 bombing raid on Tokyo. "It started in about 1980," Kurilchyk recalled. "It was just a hobby then."
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NEWS
September 28, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gen. James H. (Jimmy) Doolittle, the tough Los Angeles street kid who rose to become one of the great figures in world aviation and a World War II air hero of epic stature, died Monday at the home of his son, John P. Doolittle, in Pebble Beach, Calif. He was 96. The celebrated flying ace had suffered a stroke several weeks ago, said his daughter-in-law, Priscilla Doolittle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Col. Jack Sims, this was the mission that mattered the most. As a surviving member of the Tokyo Raiders, Sims came from Naples, Fla., to the Van Nuys Airport for a memorial flight to honor the late Gen. J.H. "Jimmy" Doolittle, who led the daring 1942 bombing run on Tokyo that marked the first American victory against the Japanese in World War II. "There was a twinkle in his eye and you'd follow him to hell and back again," Sims, 75, said of Doolittle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Col. Jack Sims, this was the mission that mattered the most. As a surviving member of the Tokyo Raiders, Sims came from Naples, Fla., to the Van Nuys Airport for a memorial flight to honor the late Gen. J.H. "Jimmy" Doolittle, who led the daring 1942 bombing run on Tokyo that marked the first American victory against the Japanese in World War II. "There was a twinkle in his eye and you'd follow him to hell and back again," Sims, 75, said of Doolittle.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone in the aeronautics community knew they had the right stuff, and now the city of Lancaster has made it official. Chuck Yeager, Jimmy Doolittle, A. Scott Crossfield, Tony LeVier and Pete Knight--pilots who achieved dizzying heights in the early days of flight testing--became the first Saturday to be honored in Lancaster's Aerospace Walk of Honor. "They're sure a different breed of cat from the rest of us," said George Root, vice mayor of Lancaster.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | LYN RIDDLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Flying ace Jimmy Doolittle promised to throw "one hell of a party" if any of his men lived through a daring air raid on Tokyo, just months after the United States entered World War II. When the crews of 15 B-25 bombers gathered on the deck of the Hornet on April 18, 1942, the odds were strong that many of them would not survive the mission. But 73 of the 80 fliers did, and Lt. Col. Doolittle kept his promise in 1946.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | From Times wire services
President Bush awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, to the late comedian Lucille Ball and to four former public leaders today. The medal for meritorious contributions to the country was given posthumously to Ball and was presented personally to retired Gen. James H. Doolittle, former Treasury Secretary C. Douglas Dillon, former Ambassador George F. Kennan and former Sen. Margaret Chase Smith (R-Me.).
BUSINESS
December 1, 1987
E. Thayer Bigelow Jr., chief financial officer of Time Inc. since 1984, has been appointed president of American Television & Communications Corp. of Englewood, Colo. ATC, the country's second-largest owner and operator of cable television systems, is an 82%-owned subsidiary of Time Inc. The appointment is effective Feb. 1. Reporting to Bigelow will be Thomas W. Binning, executive vice president-chief financial officer and James H. Doolittle, executive vice president-chief operating officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2006
June 1, 1942: Brig. Gen. James H. Doolittle, who led a legendary bombing raid against Tokyo six weeks earlier, paid tribute to workers at the North American Aviation plant in Inglewood. Addressing 12,000 workers and a nationwide radio audience, Doolittle praised the crews and the B-25s -- built at the plant -- that took part in the mission. In closing, he told the workers, "Thanks for some swell airplanes," The Times reported. Not one of Doolittle's planes was lost to enemy fire.
NEWS
September 28, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gen. James H. (Jimmy) Doolittle, the tough Los Angeles street kid who rose to become one of the great figures in world aviation and a World War II air hero of epic stature, died Monday at the home of his son, John P. Doolittle, in Pebble Beach, Calif. He was 96. The celebrated flying ace had suffered a stroke several weeks ago, said his daughter-in-law, Priscilla Doolittle.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | LYN RIDDLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Flying ace Jimmy Doolittle promised to throw "one hell of a party" if any of his men lived through a daring air raid on Tokyo, just months after the United States entered World War II. When the crews of 15 B-25 bombers gathered on the deck of the Hornet on April 18, 1942, the odds were strong that many of them would not survive the mission. But 73 of the 80 fliers did, and Lt. Col. Doolittle kept his promise in 1946.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone in the aeronautics community knew they had the right stuff, and now the city of Lancaster has made it official. Chuck Yeager, Jimmy Doolittle, A. Scott Crossfield, Tony LeVier and Pete Knight--pilots who achieved dizzying heights in the early days of flight testing--became the first Saturday to be honored in Lancaster's Aerospace Walk of Honor. "They're sure a different breed of cat from the rest of us," said George Root, vice mayor of Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Lt. Col. Horace "Sally" Crouch, 87, a member of the Doolittle Raiders who made a daring bombing run over Japan early in World War II, died Wednesday in Columbia, S.C., of complications from pneumonia. Crouch was one of 80 men who volunteered for the secret duty aboard 16 B-25 bombers for a daylight raid over Japan on April 18, 1942. His death leaves 16 surviving members of the group. The raiders, led by then-Lt. Col. James H.
OPINION
November 12, 2003
The proposal to rename the Burbank Airport the "Bob Hope Airport" is off the mark (Nov. 4). I would recommend that the Burbank Airport be named in honor of Gen. James H. "Jimmy" Doolittle. He was the winner of every medal this country had to offer, including the Medal of Honor. Doolittle's local connections include graduation from Manual Arts High School and the former Los Angeles Junior College. Check with Dolores Hope and I think you'll find she would agree that Doolittle is more deserving of this honor than her beloved Bob. Bob Hope was the ultimate comedian of the 20th century, but Doolittle was the ultimate pilot and a true American hero.
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