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James H Gomez

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NEWS
August 19, 1998 | MARK ARAX and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The former head of the state Department of Corrections testified Tuesday that he did not learn about a pattern of violence at Corcoran State Prison until years after the San Joaquin Valley penitentiary had become the most violent in the nation. At the fifth and final scheduled day of hearings before a joint legislative committee on violence at Corcoran, former corrections Director James H. Gomez attributed its problems to the state's massive prison buildup beginning in the mid-1980s.
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NEWS
August 19, 1998 | MARK ARAX and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The former head of the state Department of Corrections testified Tuesday that he did not learn about a pattern of violence at Corcoran State Prison until years after the San Joaquin Valley penitentiary had become the most violent in the nation. At the fifth and final scheduled day of hearings before a joint legislative committee on violence at Corcoran, former corrections Director James H. Gomez attributed its problems to the state's massive prison buildup beginning in the mid-1980s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The state Senate voted overwhelmingly to confirm Gov. Pete Wilson's appointment of Russell Gould as secretary of health and welfare and James H. Gomez as director of prisons. Gomez, a former chief deputy director of corrections, was approved 36 to 0, while Gould, a career state employee, was confirmed 30 to 1. Gomez left his post as a $130,000 deputy county executive in Santa Clara County to take the $100,000 state prisons post, which is regarded as one of the toughest jobs in state government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A strike by 1,000 state prison inmates--who refused to leave their cells in protest of proposed restrictions on conjugal visits--ended peacefully Thursday morning, prison officials said. The maximum-security inmates, who launched the strike Sunday evening, finally left their cells to go to breakfast, said Dean Crenshaw, spokesman for the state prison at Lancaster. Some of the inmates had abandoned the strike earlier. "Everything's back to normal," Crenshaw said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1995
This is in response to the Jan. 18 Peter King column about the Pelican Bay State Prison Security Housing Unit, which failed to point out key facts and thus was misleading to your readers. In his ruling U.S. District Judge Thelton E. Henderson recognized the need for a security housing unit to segregate dangerous predators and refused to close the unit. Judge Henderson wrote in his ruling that he does not mean to imply that all correctional staff at Pelican Bay engage in excessive or unnecessary force for the purpose of causing harm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apparently hungry for prison chow, about one-third of the inmates who had been on strike at the state prison here left their cells Wednesday, breaking ranks with those still protesting a proposed new rule that would sharply restrict conjugal visits. Breakfast Wednesday morning drew 322 inmates from the California state prison's maximum-security C-block, where about 1,000 inmates had gone on strike Sunday night, refusing to leave their cells for laundry, work, recreation or even meals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1996
Re "Tales of Brutality Behind Bars," Aug. 21: Mark Arax's story on the gladiator jousts staged at Corcoran State Prison surely documents the worst episode of the shockingly savage, inhumane and barbaric treatment accorded prison inmates. It seems that some of the seven killed there were serving relatively short sentences (less than 10 years) but they were shortened even further by their "correctional" officers. Some correction! I wonder what these guards and their supervising officers tell their children that they do while on their jobs?
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON and PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the first organized protest against proposed new limits on rights long cherished by state prison inmates, about 1,000 convicts at the prison here have gone on strike over a rule that would sharply restrict conjugal visits, officials said Tuesday. The convicts, housed in one of the prison's maximum security blocks, have refused to come out of their cells since Sunday night for work, recreation, laundry or even meals, prison officials said.
NEWS
August 11, 1993 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven female prison guards, all currently or formerly employed at Folsom State Prison, filed a class-action lawsuit in federal court Tuesday claiming sexual harassment and discrimination at the predominantly male facility.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1991 | BRADLEY INMAN, BRADLEY INMAN is an Oakland writer specializing in California business issues
Gov. Pete Wilson may be the state's chief executive, but he and his management team have limited sway over who is on the state's $7.5-billion payroll. Of 162,467 state jobs, Wilson gets to fill 956 full-time positions, which is less than 1% of the total state work force. The state Constitution requires that all state workers be Civil Service employees, except the limited number of positions appointed by the governor, the state Legislature, the lieutenant governor and 12 other state officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a surprise move, officials have told the warden at the state prison in Lancaster either to retire or accept a demotion--likely the result of a series of problems that have plagued the year-old prison, including the escapes of a convicted murderer and three other inmates. In a brief statement issued Friday, state prison officials said, "The California Department of Corrections has made a decision to restructure the management team (at the Lancaster prison) . . .
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