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James H Sammons

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NEWS
February 12, 1990 | Reuters
The head of the American Medical Assn. has resigned because of an inquiry into financial transactions, the doctors' group said Sunday. James H. Sammons, chief executive of the 300,000-member organization, said he was retiring 10 months earlier than planned because the financial questions were interfering with his job.
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NEWS
February 12, 1990 | Reuters
The head of the American Medical Assn. has resigned because of an inquiry into financial transactions, the doctors' group said Sunday. James H. Sammons, chief executive of the 300,000-member organization, said he was retiring 10 months earlier than planned because the financial questions were interfering with his job.
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NEWS
February 27, 1989
The Bush Administration and Congress were criticized for failing to fill top government health jobs. "Almost four months after the elections, we are still wondering who will be named to the post of presidential science adviser," Dr. James H. Sammons, AMA executive vice president, told the American Medical Assn.'s National Leadership Conference in Chicago, "and we don't have an assistant secretary of defense for health at the Pentagon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Nearly 80% of U.S. physicians favor withdrawing life-support systems from hopelessly ill or irreversibly comatose patients if the patients or their families request it, according to a survey results released last week. "There comes the time with the terminally ill or irreversibly comatose patient that the physician must step back and, at the patient's or the family's request, allow the patient to die with dignity," said Dr. James H. Sammons, executive vice president of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
The nation's health chief told the American Medical Assn. on Sunday that a Medicare reform plan strongly opposed by the group is a solution to skyrocketing medical costs and lack of access to quality care. Louis W. Sullivan, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, said that such solutions are better than a total overhaul of the system. The U.S. per capita expenditures for health care are the highest in the world, consuming more than 11% of the country's gross national product, "and they continue to rise at an unsustainable rate," Sullivan told more than 1,000 physicians on the opening day of the AMA's five-day policy-making session.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1986
The article by Daniel Greenberg (Editorial Pages, June 24) asked, "What's So Bad About a Doctor Glut?" Many of us believe that having a surfeit of something, especially doctors, might not be so bad. Plenty of physicians are around when you need one, if you plan ahead. But what happens when they aren't where they are most needed? Regrettably, our doctor "glut" is not all that it seems, at least not in California. We have too many physicians of the wrong specialty, practicing in the wrong places, and not enough of the right specialty in the right places.
NEWS
January 18, 1985 | United Press International
A record number of malpractice suits and large legal judgments are triggering a crisis in health care costs and services, an American Medical Assn. official warned Thursday. The AMA, which outlined the problem in a new report, said Americans are filing more than three times as many medical malpractice claims than they did a decade ago, and are winning record judgments.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Louis W. Sullivan got a sudden initiation into national controversy this week when a pro-abortion comment nearly derailed his nomination. But abortion is only one of many controversies he would face on taking over the $251-million-a-year Department of Health and Human Services, whose duties range from licensing new drugs to administering the Social Security fund.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
The "smokeless" cigarette developed by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. at an estimated cost of more than $300 million has been at least temporarily dropped after five months of testing in several cities, company officials said Tuesday. Most smokers apparently did not like Premier's taste or smell. "Very simply, it did not perform as we hoped it would in the test market," said David Fishel, senior vice president of public relations at R. J. Reynolds, a subsidiary of RJR Nabisco.
NEWS
September 16, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Large increases in doctor bills will boost the Medicare premium by $6.90 a month next January, the biggest jump in Medicare's 22-year history, federal officials announced Tuesday. The monthly premium, paid by 30 million Medicare beneficiaries, will climb to $24.80, up from $17.90 this year. Surprised members of Congress, who had been expecting a smaller increase, immediately pledged new efforts to control the cost of physicians' services.
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