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James H Warsaw

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BUSINESS
September 17, 1990 | James S. Granelli, Times staff writer
Sports Specialties Corp. is going through some pretty heady times as it rides the wave of international demand for American sports and sports products. The Irvine company makes the popular Pro brand cap, authentic headgear that the pros wear. It holds licenses from all the major professional sports leagues and college associations, as well as the International Baseball Assn., which covers about 80 nations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2009 | Claire Noland
James H. Warsaw, a Newport Beach entrepreneur who helped change the perception of sports from games with bats and balls to a business of dollars and cents, has died. He was 61. Warsaw died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications from infections, his brother Robert said Saturday. He also suffered from Parkinson's disease.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
The operators of Sports Specialties Corp. in Irvine offered Friday to buy out the chairman of bankrupt MacGregor Sporting Goods for more than $3 million as the first step in their plan to buy and revive the New Jersey company. James H. Warsaw, president of the Irvine cap manufacturer, said he submitted his investor group's proposal to Frederic H. Brooks, MacGregor's chairman and its largest shareholder with 25% of the stock. MacGregor, one of the most prominent names in athletic equipment and clothing, filed for protection from creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code last month.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1990 | James S. Granelli, Times staff writer
Sports Specialties Corp. is going through some pretty heady times as it rides the wave of international demand for American sports and sports products. The Irvine company makes the popular Pro brand cap, authentic headgear that the pros wear. It holds licenses from all the major professional sports leagues and college associations, as well as the International Baseball Assn., which covers about 80 nations.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
George Bush, First Sportsman, is a man who has worn many hats: Stetson, fisherman's cap, football helmet. But on Thursday, Bush received what could be the most unusual athletic attire of his sporting life--an All-American baseball cap embroidered with CCCP, the Cyrillic alphabet initials for the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. And he owes it all to glasnost and Sports Specialties Corp., the Irvine maker of Pro brand baseball caps. Sports Specialties has moved quickly into international sales with separate contracts to supply caps to the national baseball teams of 80 countries and to the Soviet national baseball team for its U.S. tour, which began Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2009 | Claire Noland
James H. Warsaw, a Newport Beach entrepreneur who helped change the perception of sports from games with bats and balls to a business of dollars and cents, has died. He was 61. Warsaw died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications from infections, his brother Robert said Saturday. He also suffered from Parkinson's disease.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sports merchandiser James H. Warsaw said Wednesday that he wants to settle a lawsuit he filed against Nike Inc. by having the athletic products giant donate $700,000 worth of apparel to earthquake victims and $300,000 in cash to other charitable causes. Warsaw, former president of Nike's Sports Specialties Corp. subsidiary in Irvine, said he would drop his portion of the fraud and breach-of-contract suit that he and his brother filed two months ago if the Beaverton, Ore.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
A week after presenting a plan to take over MacGregor Sporting Goods Inc., the operators of Sports Specialties Corp. in Irvine decided Tuesday to drop their bid. James H. Warsaw said new demands by MacGregor's chairman made the purchase "less attractive" to a group headed by him and his brother, Robert A. Warsaw. Robert is chairman and James is president of Sports Specialties, makers of Pro brand baseball caps. "He brought up new provisions that would complicate, stall and make less attractive our proposal," Warsaw said.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1993 | Greg Johnson / Times staff writer
Sports-Marketing Studies: Sports marketing, already a big business, is going to get bigger. And Newport Beach-based resident James Warsaw, a 1969 graduate of the University of Oregon, thinks it's about time someone starts to study the phenomenon. So Warsaw recently pledged $250,000 to the University of Oregon--and promised to raise an equal amount--to create a center to study sports marketing and promotion. Warsaw, 46, hopes that the James H.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
The operators of Sports Specialties Corp., an Irvine baseball cap maker, said Tuesday that they have drawn up a plan to buy bankrupt MacGregor Sporting Goods Inc., one of the most prominent names in athletic equipment and clothing. James H. Warsaw said he and his brother, Robert A. Warsaw, acting independently of Sports Specialties, planned to present a takeover proposal to MacGregor Chairman Frederic H. Brooks today. The plan includes the repayment of MacGregor's secured debts totaling $18 million and the relocation of the firm's headquarters to Irvine, James Warsaw said.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
The operators of Sports Specialties Corp. in Irvine offered Friday to buy out the chairman of bankrupt MacGregor Sporting Goods for more than $3 million as the first step in their plan to buy and revive the New Jersey company. James H. Warsaw, president of the Irvine cap manufacturer, said he submitted his investor group's proposal to Frederic H. Brooks, MacGregor's chairman and its largest shareholder with 25% of the stock. MacGregor, one of the most prominent names in athletic equipment and clothing, filed for protection from creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code last month.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
George Bush, First Sportsman, is a man who has worn many hats: Stetson, fisherman's cap, football helmet. But on Thursday, Bush received what could be the most unusual athletic attire of his sporting life--an All-American baseball cap embroidered with CCCP, the Cyrillic alphabet initials for the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. And he owes it all to glasnost and Sports Specialties Corp., the Irvine maker of Pro brand baseball caps. Sports Specialties has moved quickly into international sales with separate contracts to supply caps to the national baseball teams of 80 countries and to the Soviet national baseball team for its U.S. tour, which began Monday.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nike Inc. said Thursday that it has signed a letter of intent to acquire fast-growing Sports Specialties Corp., the world's largest distributor of licensed athletic caps, for more than $50 million. The purchase price, subject to various factors, will be determined when the deal is closed in about two months. Sports Specialties, based in Irvine, will be operated as a Nike subsidiary. Its management and employees will remain.
SPORTS
October 18, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
Nike, Anheuser-Busch and other companies on Wednesday said they will end their endorsement deals with cycling great Lance Armstrong, a week after the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency released a report detailing allegations of widespread doping use by Armstrong and his teams. Nike has remained loyal to some of its stained sports celebrities in the past, and it had sponsored Armstrong since 1996. But the powerful shoe and sports apparel company dumped Armstrong as an endorser, effective immediately.
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