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James Harman

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NEWS
March 14, 1991 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Let's forget the exposition this week and cut to the facts. The James Harman Band, "those dangerous gentlemens," will be headlining this week's Blue Monday presentation at Alexander's in Ventura. Harman has been playing his version of the rockin' blues since he was a teen-ager in Alabama in the '60s. Be there. Trust me this time. He shreds--just ask him, or let me. How's the tour and all that? Well, we're in Atlanta right now. We're someplace different every day.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In recent years, veteran Orange County blues musician James Harman could be found buying lottery tickets everywhere he went, betting on the ponies, even feeding the one-armed bandit in Nevada. Had this hard-working singer, harmonica player and songwriter, who says he loathes blues stereotypes, been sucked in, after more than 35 years in the business, by the hedonism and impulsiveness that underlie the stereotypes? Nah. He was just doing research.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Eric Clapton dishing out an acoustic, down-home version of "Layla" seemingly every hour or so on VH-1 and MTV, with patriarchs such as John Lee Hooker and Buddy Guy enjoying resurgent popularity, with blues festivals sprouting like cabbages and the legacies of long-buried blues men and women re-emerging from record company vaults, blues music seems to be in fine shape. That doesn't make things easier down in the trenches, where James Harman earns his living.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1998 | JAMES E. FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Singer Carrie James is excited. And she has good reasons to be. James and her band will perform for the first time at B.B. King's this Friday, opening for world-famous blues man James Harman. "We're really excited about it," James said. "We're going to have some fun that night." Also, the Carrie James Band's first CD, "Midnight Road," was released about three months ago and it's doing pretty well. It has received good reviews and airplay on KLOS-FM and college radio stations across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In recent years, veteran Orange County blues musician James Harman could be found buying lottery tickets everywhere he went, betting on the ponies, even feeding the one-armed bandit in Nevada. Had this hard-working singer, harmonica player and songwriter, who says he loathes blues stereotypes, been sucked in, after more than 35 years in the business, by the hedonism and impulsiveness that underlie the stereotypes? Nah. He was just doing research.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Huntington Beach finheads are as territorial as other locals when it comes to putting bumps on surfers with a different ZIP code. Don't blame James Harman, who's lived in Huntington Beach since 1970 and never ever hogged anybody's wave. He plays the blues. He doesn't give them. The well-dressed harmonica player and "those dangerous gentlemens" in his band will be making their Underground debut in Santa Barbara on Friday, across from the X Files. Harman talked things over recently by phone.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for The Times
There's something altogether fitting about blues man James Harman gig Saturday aB. King's Blues Club. Back in the '60s, Harman was just another white youngster playing blues classics, although talented and fortunate enough to find himself touring as the opening act for B. B. King. One day backstage, while they listened to tapes together, King suggested that Harman focus on singing his own material. "Where would I be if I only did T-Bone Walker songs?" Harman remembers King telling him.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stroke of coincidence, the Big Three of the Orange County blues scene all have new releases out. James Harman's revamped lineup has helped him craft one of his most charming and invigorating albums; the sizzling Walter Trout Band finally has a chance to let American fans know what Europeans already understand, and Robert Lucas continues to stake out his turf as a top-notch traditionalist. Ratings range from * (born under a bad sign) to **** (hallelujah, we love it so).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | STACY FINZ
James Harman is still trying to break into his hardest market. The Rhino Records rhythm and blues man, along with his James Harman Band, often referred to as "Those Dangerous Gentlemens," will play their roots-rock originals at Rio's tonight. A local group, The Forbidden Pigs, will open the show at the Point Loma club at 9 p.m. Harman, who has been making records since the 1960s, said San Diego has not been receptive to his music and doesn't acknowledge local musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1997 | JAMES FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blues singer-harmonica player James Harman has performed all over the world, but this Saturday he'll be on stage at Smokin' Johnnie's in the Valley. The Studio City venue is relatively small for someone of Harman's professional stature. He's regularly on tour in 18 countries for about 250 dates a year. But the Orange County-based performer has his reasons for taking the Valley gig. "I don't travel when it's icy and cold," said Harman. "I'm too old, and I've done it.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of Orange County's most experienced blues figures, traditionalistJames Harman and blues-rocker Mike Reilly, have come calling with new CDs. Ratings range from * (poor) to **** (excellent), with three stars a solid recommendation.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for The Times
There's something altogether fitting about blues man James Harman gig Saturday aB. King's Blues Club. Back in the '60s, Harman was just another white youngster playing blues classics, although talented and fortunate enough to find himself touring as the opening act for B. B. King. One day backstage, while they listened to tapes together, King suggested that Harman focus on singing his own material. "Where would I be if I only did T-Bone Walker songs?" Harman remembers King telling him.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Huntington Beach finheads are as territorial as other locals when it comes to putting bumps on surfers with a different ZIP code. Don't blame James Harman, who's lived in Huntington Beach since 1970 and never ever hogged anybody's wave. He plays the blues. He doesn't give them. The well-dressed harmonica player and "those dangerous gentlemens" in his band will be making their Underground debut in Santa Barbara on Friday, across from the X Files. Harman talked things over recently by phone.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stroke of coincidence, the Big Three of the Orange County blues scene all have new releases out. James Harman's revamped lineup has helped him craft one of his most charming and invigorating albums; the sizzling Walter Trout Band finally has a chance to let American fans know what Europeans already understand, and Robert Lucas continues to stake out his turf as a top-notch traditionalist. Ratings range from * (born under a bad sign) to **** (hallelujah, we love it so).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Eric Clapton dishing out an acoustic, down-home version of "Layla" seemingly every hour or so on VH-1 and MTV, with patriarchs such as John Lee Hooker and Buddy Guy enjoying resurgent popularity, with blues festivals sprouting like cabbages and the legacies of long-buried blues men and women re-emerging from record company vaults, blues music seems to be in fine shape. That doesn't make things easier down in the trenches, where James Harman earns his living.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
The third annual Harmonica Blowdown wasn't quite the night of the endless shuffle, but there were enough up-tempo blues at the six-hour performance to satiate the capacity crowd at the Music Machine on Saturday night. The blowdown, a benefit for the family of the late George (Harmonica) Smith, paired hometown stalwarts William Clarke and James Harman with two veterans making their local debuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1998 | JAMES E. FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Singer Carrie James is excited. And she has good reasons to be. James and her band will perform for the first time at B.B. King's this Friday, opening for world-famous blues man James Harman. "We're really excited about it," James said. "We're going to have some fun that night." Also, the Carrie James Band's first CD, "Midnight Road," was released about three months ago and it's doing pretty well. It has received good reviews and airplay on KLOS-FM and college radio stations across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1993 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kid Ramos is 34 now, but "Kid" he remains. Back on his 25th birthday his old band mates tried renaming him Adult Ramos, but it just didn't stick. At the time, the muscular guitarist with the character-actor face was one of the pistons firing the James Harman Band, which to this writer was far and above the best band ever to come tearing out of this county.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Let's forget the exposition this week and cut to the facts. The James Harman Band, "those dangerous gentlemens," will be headlining this week's Blue Monday presentation at Alexander's in Ventura. Harman has been playing his version of the rockin' blues since he was a teen-ager in Alabama in the '60s. Be there. Trust me this time. He shreds--just ask him, or let me. How's the tour and all that? Well, we're in Atlanta right now. We're someplace different every day.
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