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James Harrell

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BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | DAVID OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Iron Curtain has crumbled over the past several months, local businessmen James Harrell and Paul Armstrong have been devouring all the news they can about the fast-paced changes sweeping the Soviet Union and the rest of Eastern Europe. During the past year, both Harrell and Armstrong have formed separate companies with the idea of tapping the potential created by the extraordinary political and economic changes that have taken place in Eastern Europe.
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BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | DAVID OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Iron Curtain has crumbled over the past several months, local businessmen James Harrell and Paul Armstrong have been devouring all the news they can about the fast-paced changes sweeping the Soviet Union and the rest of Eastern Europe. During the past year, both Harrell and Armstrong have formed separate companies with the idea of tapping the potential created by the extraordinary political and economic changes that have taken place in Eastern Europe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN
A 29-year-old woman battling a rare autoimmune disease is hoping to become the first patient in the country with the ailment to receive a double lung transplant following unsuccessful surgery last week to help her breathe. Shelley Ybarra of Rancho Santa Margarita suffers from Wegener's granulomatosis, a tissue disease that has collapsed about 70% of her lungs.
NEWS
May 7, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American researchers have discovered the world's oldest paved road, a 4,600-year-old highway that linked a basalt quarry in a desolate region of the Egyptian desert to waterways that carried basalt blocks to monument sites along the Nile. The eight-mile road is at least 500 years older than any previously discovered road and is the only paved road discovered in ancient Egypt, said geologist Thomas Bown of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2004 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
When Hollywood stars raise funds for a cause related to one of their own children, they're following the lead of Spencer Tracy's wife, Louise, who opened the hearts and ears of the world to the plight of deaf children. She founded the John Tracy Clinic, the first preschool in the nation to offer free emotional support, information and speech and lip-reading classes to help families cope with deafness. It's named for the couple's son, who is deaf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before she goes to sleep each night, Shelley Ybarra reaches for the oxygen tank beside her bed and inhales. Breathing with ease has become a luxury for her. Ybarra, 30, of Rancho Santa Margarita suffers from Wegener's granulomatosis, a rare tissue disease that has deteriorated more than 70% of her lungs. Like many incurable diseases, hers is volatile. Yet, Ybarra bucked seemingly overwhelming odds to give birth in 1993 to a healthy boy, Austin. The following year, she had another son, Alex.
SPORTS
September 7, 1985 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The National Football League tried its best to ignore the United States Football League, until some of the new league's players became available. According to estimates from USFL officials, as many as 70 of their former players will be on NFL rosters when the regular season begins Sunday. Included are some of the few marquee names that the USFL had. The Houston Oilers have running back Mike Rozier, a former Heisman Trophy winner who played for the Pittsburgh Maulers and Jacksonville Bulls.
SPORTS
April 28, 1985 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
When the befuddled, battered, beleaguered United States Football League owners gather in New York to discuss the future Monday, those birds circling overhead won't be doves. National Football League clubs are ready to pounce on what could produce a bigger bonanza of fresh meat than Tuesday's annual draft. Herschel Walker. Steve Young. Doug Flutie. There are others. The best part is that they would all come in with pro experience. No waiting. This way to the starting lineup.
NEWS
June 26, 2005 | Bobby Ross Jr., Associated Press Writer
It started with an e-mail cry for help. "Heart kid," the subject line said. Dr. Ellen Little, an American pediatrician working as a medical missionary in Kampala, Uganda, sent the message to all the doctors in her address book. "Many of you have said to me over the years, 'If there is anything I can do for you, just let me know,' " Little wrote. " 'Well, I'm not sure, but this may be your time.'
SCIENCE
June 19, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Archeologists have unearthed a 4,000-year-old gold-processing center along the middle Nile in Sudan that suggests the ancient kingdom of Kush was much larger than scholars previously believed and would have rivaled the domain of the Egyptians to the north. Kush, which was called Nubia by the Greeks, was the first urban civilization in sub-Saharan Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hope Floats" has a terrific opening. Tempted by the offer of a free make-over, a Chicago housewife and mother (Sandra Bullock) goes on a Jerry Springer-type TV show (hosted by a deliciously unctuous Kathy Najimy) only to be confronted unexpectedly by her best friend (an unbilled Rosanna Arquette), who promptly announces that she's having an affair with Bullock's husband.
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