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James Hicks

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July 4, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norman McHaffie, the owner of a small Sylmar defense subcontracting shop, was sentenced to three years in prison and fined $750,000 on Tuesday for his guilty plea to charges that his company falsified tests on millions of aerospace bolts over a 10-year period. James Hicks, McHaffie's quality control supervisor, was also sentenced to 1 1/2 years in prison. Last month, William Whitham, another employee, was sentenced to 20 weekends of incarceration and 150 hours of community service.
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BUSINESS
July 4, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norman McHaffie, the owner of a small Sylmar defense subcontracting shop, was sentenced to three years in prison and fined $750,000 on Tuesday for his guilty plea to charges that his company falsified tests on millions of aerospace bolts over a 10-year period. James Hicks, McHaffie's quality control supervisor, was also sentenced to 1 1/2 years in prison. Last month, William Whitham, another employee, was sentenced to 20 weekends of incarceration and 150 hours of community service.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
James L. Hicks, a former war correspondent and executive editor of the New York Voice and the Amsterdam News and the first black correspondent accredited during the Korean War, died Sunday of complications from a stroke. He was 70. Hicks, who rose from private to captain in the Army in World War II, receiving a presidential citation for commanding troops in New Guinea, became Washington bureau chief of the National Negro Press Assn. after the war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
James L. Hicks, a former war correspondent and executive editor of the New York Voice and the Amsterdam News and the first black newsmen accredited during the Korean War, died Sunday of complications from a stroke. He was 70. Hicks, who rose from private to captain in the Army in World War II, receiving a presidential citation for commanding troops in New Guinea, became Washington bureau chief of the National Negro Press Assn. after the war.
REAL ESTATE
March 29, 1987
The Sammis Co. of Irvine has purchased a 37-acre land parcel in Carlsbad for $6 million. The Carlsbad office of Coldwell Banker represented the buyer and James M. Hicks Commercial Real Estate Co. represented the seller, the MacArthur Foundation in Chicago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1990
A former employee of a defense subcontractor was sentenced Monday to 20 weekends in jail for his role in a scheme to produce 9 million untested bolts for military aircraft, including the B-1 bomber. William R. Whitham, a former shop floor manager for McHaffie Inc. of Sylmar, also was ordered by U.S. District Judge Wallace Tashima to perform 150 hours of community service and serve three years of probation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's an intelligent thriller lurking inside "Defenseless," but the intelligence is constantly obscured by the B-movie plot devices and crude direction and a jangly score that telegraphs everything but the kitchen sink. The setting for the film (citywide) is the porno underworld. T.K. (Barbara Hershey) is defending a real-estate tycoon Steven Seldes (J.T. Walsh) who is also her lover and, as it turns out, married to her best friend from college (Mary Beth Hurt).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1991 | TINA DAUNT
The Medical Board of California is seeking to revoke the license of a Port Hueneme doctor and has placed two other Ventura County physicians on probation, a department spokeswoman said Tuesday. James Hicks, who had been disciplined in 1984 for abusing alcohol, could lose his license if an administrative law judge finds that he failed to complete a rigorous state substance-abuse program, spokeswoman Janie Cordray said. A hearing on the matter is expected to be set this summer.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | Associated Press
Appalachian coal miners voted Monday on a contract with Pittston Coal Group that could end an acrimonious 10-month strike that drew international support from labor organizations. United Mine Workers Vice President Cecil Roberts planned to announce the result of the vote this morning at the union's southwest Virginia district office, UMW spokesman Gene Carroll said. A simultaneous announcement was planned at the AFL-CIO convention in Miami. James Hicks, president of Local 1259 in Cleveland, Va.
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