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NEWS
October 31, 1996 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Hillman, author of "The Soul's Code" (Random House), has been a professor at Yale University and the University of Chicago, a student of Carl Jung and director of studies at the Carl Jung Institute in Zurich. Yet, asked which of these accomplishments he prefers to be known by, he squirms. He prefers, he finally says, to be known simply as an "independent thinker." Hillman believes "an author should stay at home and write and not be involved in salesmanship."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2004
I hate to complain, but it stuck in my craw that with the war going on and America in need of revolution on so many levels, you gave the unremarkable James Caan ("James Caan's Next Act," May 16) top billing -- front page and a detailed two-page spread -- while we had to bump into James Hillman ("Mankind Is From Mars"), one of the few truly innovative, subtle and iconoclastic thinkers living today. I understand Los Angeles heads a nation obsessed with celebrity gods, but why doesn't The Times take the lead in shifting our focus?
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BOOKS
September 15, 1996 | Sven Birkerts, Sven Birkerts is the author of "The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age" (Faber and Faber). He recently edited "Tolstoy's Dictaphone: Technology and the Muse" (Graywolf Press)
There was a time--possibly a better time--when a person could use a word like "soul" or "fate" without swallowing hard first, when philosophers actually occupied themselves with questions about the meaning and purpose of human existence. All such terminologies and musings are now considered romantic bosh, at least by sophisticates. Serious talk about human possibility--which in fact has quite a noble tradition--is exclusively new age business. Soft, even contemptible.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Louise Steinman, Special to The Times
"War demands a leap of imagination as extraordinary and fantastic as the phenomenon itself," psychologist James Hillman writes in the first pages of his demanding and daring new book, "A Terrible Love of War." What blocks our ability to comprehend war, in Hillman's perspective, is "our endemic national disease: the addiction to innocence." War has always been with us.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Almost no one eagerly anticipates the prospect of growing old. It only seems like a good idea when compared with the alternative. In the fight against advancing years, whatever weapons we may choose--exercise, yoga, nutrition, a positive attitude, new friends and experiences, or face lifts and tummy tucks--we all hope to stay, or at very least to seem, as young as we can.
BOOKS
May 31, 1992 | Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Csikszentmihalyi is a professor of psychology at the University of Chicago. His most recent book is "Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience."
This Tuesday, about 60,000 representatives from 160 governments, in cluding U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, will meet in Rio de Janeiro for a two-week Earth Summit to try to reconcile the needs of developing countries with the carrying capacity of the environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2004
I hate to complain, but it stuck in my craw that with the war going on and America in need of revolution on so many levels, you gave the unremarkable James Caan ("James Caan's Next Act," May 16) top billing -- front page and a detailed two-page spread -- while we had to bump into James Hillman ("Mankind Is From Mars"), one of the few truly innovative, subtle and iconoclastic thinkers living today. I understand Los Angeles heads a nation obsessed with celebrity gods, but why doesn't The Times take the lead in shifting our focus?
BUSINESS
June 15, 1992 | Anne Michaud, Times Staff Writer
It's the difference between a la carte and prix fixe . Add a measure of bureaucracy and put human health at stake, and you get the difficulty of converting from traditional medicine to health maintenance. Unified Medical Group Assn. helps existing groups of doctors convert some of their practice to health maintenance after they contract to see HMO patients. The association's executive director, James O. Hillman, has begun to receive membership applications from across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Louise Steinman, Special to The Times
"War demands a leap of imagination as extraordinary and fantastic as the phenomenon itself," psychologist James Hillman writes in the first pages of his demanding and daring new book, "A Terrible Love of War." What blocks our ability to comprehend war, in Hillman's perspective, is "our endemic national disease: the addiction to innocence." War has always been with us.
BOOKS
December 28, 1997
Rob Smith, writer: "Memoirs of a Georgian Rake," by William Hickey (Folio Society). "Hickey was a self-proclaimed profligate and considered himself lucky to be one of the first English barristers posted to India in the 19th century. His account of colonial decadence is appalling but entertaining." **** Gregory Vargas, print production manager: "Dream Animals," by James Hillman and Margot McLean (Chronicle Books).
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Almost no one eagerly anticipates the prospect of growing old. It only seems like a good idea when compared with the alternative. In the fight against advancing years, whatever weapons we may choose--exercise, yoga, nutrition, a positive attitude, new friends and experiences, or face lifts and tummy tucks--we all hope to stay, or at very least to seem, as young as we can.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Hillman, author of "The Soul's Code" (Random House), has been a professor at Yale University and the University of Chicago, a student of Carl Jung and director of studies at the Carl Jung Institute in Zurich. Yet, asked which of these accomplishments he prefers to be known by, he squirms. He prefers, he finally says, to be known simply as an "independent thinker." Hillman believes "an author should stay at home and write and not be involved in salesmanship."
BOOKS
September 15, 1996 | Sven Birkerts, Sven Birkerts is the author of "The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age" (Faber and Faber). He recently edited "Tolstoy's Dictaphone: Technology and the Muse" (Graywolf Press)
There was a time--possibly a better time--when a person could use a word like "soul" or "fate" without swallowing hard first, when philosophers actually occupied themselves with questions about the meaning and purpose of human existence. All such terminologies and musings are now considered romantic bosh, at least by sophisticates. Serious talk about human possibility--which in fact has quite a noble tradition--is exclusively new age business. Soft, even contemptible.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1992 | Anne Michaud, Times Staff Writer
It's the difference between a la carte and prix fixe . Add a measure of bureaucracy and put human health at stake, and you get the difficulty of converting from traditional medicine to health maintenance. Unified Medical Group Assn. helps existing groups of doctors convert some of their practice to health maintenance after they contract to see HMO patients. The association's executive director, James O. Hillman, has begun to receive membership applications from across the country.
BOOKS
May 31, 1992 | Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Csikszentmihalyi is a professor of psychology at the University of Chicago. His most recent book is "Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience."
This Tuesday, about 60,000 representatives from 160 governments, in cluding U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, will meet in Rio de Janeiro for a two-week Earth Summit to try to reconcile the needs of developing countries with the carrying capacity of the environment.
BOOKS
August 30, 1992 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE BEST AMERICAN POETRY Charles Simic, Editor, David Lehman, Series Editor (Collier Books/Macmillan: $13; 352 pp.) This anthology bravely asserts each year that poetry is not dead in America. Poems are culled from periodicals published in the previous year. AFTER AZTLAN: Latino Poets of the Nineties edited by Ray Gonzalez (Godine: $24.95 (cloth), $15.95 (paper); 224 pp.) Poems by poets of Hispanic origin writing in English.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2010
MUSIC Sublime With Rome: Members of the famed Long Beach reggae-punk band Sublime have re-formed with vocalist Rome Ramirez stepping in for Bradley Nowell, who died in 1996. The group introduces its new lineup and kicks off its exclusive and hotly anticipated six-date theater tour with two nights at the Palladium. Hollywood Palladium, 6215 W. Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. 7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. (323) 962-7600. http://www.livenation.com. EVENTS Red Book Dialogues: This series of public conversations pairs Jungian analysts with artists and thinkers to explore and respond to "The Red Book," Carl Jung's long-unseen illuminated manuscript, on display now at the Hammer.
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