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James Intveld

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Intveld is a versatile talent: Not only can he play the devil out of most instruments in the standard roots-rock repertoire, but he can play the devil, period. At 37, Intveld is one of the most widely experienced, respected and busiest roots and country musicians in Southern California. His parallel, lower-profile career as an actor recently found him wrapping up a turn as Satan in an unreleased independent film called "Fis-mol." The movie portrays "the devil as a human being. No horns.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Intveld can think of plenty of things worse than having just released what's only the second album of his 20-year-plus career on the Southern California roots-rock scene, or the fact that his first album hasn't sold as many copies in five years as the new Madonna album will sell today. In Passaic, N.J. To redheads. Insomnia, for instance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
The music business has a lot to offer mystery-lovers, what with little industry perplexities such as, "How can bands have million-selling records and nothing to show for it?" and "How come it currently costs less to make a CD than an LP but the CD still retails for $5 more?" One mystery particular to Orange County is, "How come the Garden Grove-raised James Intveld isn't a star and doesn't even have a recording contract?"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM
Chuck Berry's witty songbook is in no danger of going stale, but his headlining set on Saturday at the Hootenanny '97 Festival included an apt revision of "Rock 'n' Roll Music." "Some people said rock 'n' roll would fade / It's been 40 years since that remark was made," Berry sang. The modest, folksy Hootenanny is a reminder of why rock 'n' roll has been worth preserving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Intveld can think of plenty of things worse than having just released what's only the second album of his 20-year-plus career on the Southern California roots-rock scene, or the fact that his first album hasn't sold as many copies in five years as the new Madonna album will sell today. In Passaic, N.J. To redheads. Insomnia, for instance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Intveld is becoming Hollywood's designated expert on Elvis impersonation. Earlier this year, Intveld was the singing voice behind leading man Johnny Depp in the John Waters film "Cry-Baby." The film, a fanciful account of the birth of rock 'n' roll, centers on Cry-Baby Walker, a rocking juvenile delinquent in black leather and slicked-back hair who bears a decidedly Presleyan stamp.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM
Chuck Berry's witty songbook is in no danger of going stale, but his headlining set on Saturday at the Hootenanny '97 Festival included an apt revision of "Rock 'n' Roll Music." "Some people said rock 'n' roll would fade / It's been 40 years since that remark was made," Berry sang. The modest, folksy Hootenanny is a reminder of why rock 'n' roll has been worth preserving.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1997
The 1997 Long Beach Museum of Art series: * June 25: Kris McKay and Feather River * July 2: Boozoo Chavis and the Magic Sounds * July 9: Duke Robillard Band * July 16: Bobby Matos * July 23: Wylie and the Wild West Show * July 30: Dave Alvin and Chris Gaffney * Aug. 6: Katy Moffatt * Aug. 13: Paladins and Russell Scott & his Red Hots * Aug. 20: Candy Kane and James Intveld * Aug. 27: The Dirty Dozen * Sept. 3: Samba Mapangala * Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM
Pleased with last month's experimental series of shows by acts outside the commercial mainstream of country music, management at the Crazy Horse Steak House has decided to continue regular bookings of progressive-country acts. Fred Reiser, co-owner of the Santa Ana venue, said he was "encouraged" by the turnout for the Tuesday night shows by Will Glover, James Intveld and Chris Gaffney and the Cold Hard Facts, which each drew 175 or more to the 250-seat club.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Intveld is a versatile talent: Not only can he play the devil out of most instruments in the standard roots-rock repertoire, but he can play the devil, period. At 37, Intveld is one of the most widely experienced, respected and busiest roots and country musicians in Southern California. His parallel, lower-profile career as an actor recently found him wrapping up a turn as Satan in an unreleased independent film called "Fis-mol." The movie portrays "the devil as a human being. No horns.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
The music business has a lot to offer mystery-lovers, what with little industry perplexities such as, "How can bands have million-selling records and nothing to show for it?" and "How come it currently costs less to make a CD than an LP but the CD still retails for $5 more?" One mystery particular to Orange County is, "How come the Garden Grove-raised James Intveld isn't a star and doesn't even have a recording contract?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Intveld is becoming Hollywood's designated expert on Elvis impersonation. Earlier this year, Intveld was the singing voice behind leading man Johnny Depp in the John Waters film "Cry-Baby." The film, a fanciful account of the birth of rock 'n' roll, centers on Cry-Baby Walker, a rocking juvenile delinquent in black leather and slicked-back hair who bears a decidedly Presleyan stamp.
NEWS
January 6, 2005
Saturday marks what would have been Elvis Presley's 70th birthday, so in addition to the annual Elvis Birthday Bash, the L.A. City Council is getting in on the festivities by proclaiming it Elvis Day and installing a plaque at the recording studio on Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood where he recorded "Jailhouse Rock" and many other hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
On one level, the second annual Elvis Presley birthday benefit at the Music Machine on Sunday night was just a good excuse to have a party. And the evening worked just fine on that basis. Eighteen local musicians--from country star Dwight Yoakam to rock hero Dave Alvin--took turns singing nearly four dozen Presley-related songs (including two novelties about him) during a wonderfully engaging 3 1/2-hour concert.
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