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James Irvine

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1995
The game of golf was introduced to Orange County by James Irvine, who organized the county's first golf club in 1899. Originally called the Sunset Club Links, it was later incorporated as the Santiago Golf Club. The county's first nine-hole golf course was on Irvine land near the edge of what is now Lower Peters Canyon Reservoir. Today there are dozens of golf courses in the county.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art's new role as conservator of the Watts Towers has brought an almost immediate payoff: a $500,000 grant from the James Irvine Foundation, announced Wednesday, to help fund repair and preservation of the landmark folk-art masterpiece. "We're thrilled," said Olga Garay, executive director of the city's Department of Cultural Affairs, which manages the towers and recently struck a trial one-year agreement with LACMA for conservation and help with promoting the towers to prospective visitors and funders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The County of Orange was just 8 years old when the fledgling Board of Supervisors recorded what became known as "The Gift Munificent" in the minutes for Oct. 11, 1897. The supervisors unanimously moved that the Irvine Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2009 | Susan Emerling
Some time next year, a seeing-eye dog may guide visitors -- even those with no vision problems -- through the galleries of the Hammer Museum in Westwood to a pre-selected painting. In San Francisco, young actors in training may be found rounding up an audience for a play staged in a bar or in the rec room of a juvenile detention facility.
NEWS
June 26, 1990
1864-66: James Irvine, a prosperous San Francisco merchant who came to California during the Gold Rush, buys parts of what had been three enormous Spanish land grants south of the small town of Los Angeles. The price is $25,000 for 108,000 acres. Irvine and his three partners raise sheep on the land. 1870: Irvine buys out his partners for $150,000. When Orange County forms 18 years later, Irvine will own a quarter of it. 1886: James Irvine Jr., known as "J.I.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1996 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billionaire land baron Donald L. Bren has quietly bought all outstanding shares in the Irvine Co., increasing his stake to 100% from 92% in a deal worth at least $80 million. Some outside investors who had bought stock in Orange County's largest landowner at $400,000 a share recently received offers from Bren, the Irvine Co. chairman, to purchase the stock at $425,000 per share.
NEWS
March 11, 1996 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The kingdom of Donald Leroy Bren gleams in the winter sunlight shimmering off the Pacific Ocean. The last of California's land barons, he glances down from his corporate tower at the shopping mecca, the Newport Beach office building, the thousands of beige homes. "Problem with a day like this--the sun comes in every direction," says Bren, referring to one of the few things in his empire that he doesn't control.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1988 | Allan Jalon
The muse of public art, promising both civic pride and cultural status, is often a siren, luring politicians and artists to jagged shores of public embarrassment. Boosterism collides with artistic conscience; projects collapse or turn bland in the hands of anxious committees. On the surface, Irvine has fared well with the general look of the city's first piece of public sculpture, newly installed in front of the county library at Heritage Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds
The James Irvine Foundation, long one of the state's leading donors to social causes and the arts, is trimming its staff from 42 positions to 35 in the wake of hefty stock-market losses and plans a strategic shift that will reduce its arts philanthropy. The first move in that shift: the termination of program director Melanie Beene, the most senior of the foundation's three arts staffers, who will leave her position at the end of the month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2003 | Stanley Allison, Times Staff Writer
In a large room at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences film archive in Hollywood, where prints of "Gone With the Wind," "On the Waterfront" and "Casablanca" are kept in a controlled environment for their protection, rests a collection of home movies shot by James Irvine II. Irvine's movies of beach picnics, vacations and life on the ranch offer a rare glimpse of a family known for building one of the nation's largest agricultural empires yet one also steeped in privacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
When you least expect it -- and perhaps most need it -- the underground garden pops out of nowhere in the center of the busy city. The James Irvine Garden has both startled and soothed passersby in the Little Tokyo section of Los Angeles for 23 years. A wall of coast redwoods framed by Japanese black pine trees separates it from a high-rise next door.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds
The James Irvine Foundation, long one of the state's leading donors to social causes and the arts, is trimming its staff from 42 positions to 35 in the wake of hefty stock-market losses and plans a strategic shift that will reduce its arts philanthropy. The first move in that shift: the termination of program director Melanie Beene, the most senior of the foundation's three arts staffers, who will leave her position at the end of the month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine Co. Chairman Donald L. Bren on Wednesday said he will set aside more than 11,000 additional acres of his ranch as permanent open space, including a key parcel in Laguna Canyon and a swath of the rugged Santa Ana Mountains. The announcement was made at a press briefing followed by a company-hosted "celebration" at the Four Seasons hotel, where some 200 conservationists and public officials heard the news.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To most people, a piece of broken glass in the dirt is nothing more than yesterday's trash. To Nick Magalousis, it can be a tiny window into history. There's plenty of broken glass just below the surface where one of Orange County's most powerful families once reigned over an agricultural empire that stretched from the mountains to the ocean.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After four generations of ownership, the reclusive Irvine family is selling one of the largest remaining parcels on Southern California's coast--a pristine, two-acre, bluff-top site in Laguna Beach. The asking price for this oceanfront gem: an unprecedented $40 million. If the property is sold at or near that amount--and that is a big "if" in this shaky economy--it would set a record for residential land in Southern California, possibly anywhere in the country, according to brokers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1995
James Irvine purchased hundreds of acres of ranch land in 1864 from Mexican cattle baron Don Jose Sepulveda. That property was the beginning of Irvine Ranch, whose future is now the subject of debate between Irvine Co. developers and local preservationists. Irvine Co. is planning a residential and commercial development for the original ranch site and has offered 16.5 acres for a historical park that would include six turn-of-the-century buildings.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After four generations of ownership, the reclusive Irvine family is selling one of the largest remaining parcels on Southern California's coast--a pristine, two-acre, bluff-top site in Laguna Beach. The asking price for this oceanfront gem: an unprecedented $40 million. If the property is sold at or near that amount--and that is a big "if" in this shaky economy--it would set a record for residential land in Southern California, possibly anywhere in the country, according to brokers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a century ago, James Irvine stood on his property--maybe on the front porch of his mansion, on what is now the corner of Irvine Boulevard and Jamboree Road--and surveyed the thousands of open acres around him. He had an unobstructed, horseshoe-shaped view of the San Gabriel and Santa Ana mountains, of the Tustin hills that are now called Lemon Heights, of the San Joaquin hills that stretch toward Laguna Beach. Irvine Ranch, his land was called.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a century ago, James Irvine stood on his property--maybe on the front porch of his mansion, on what is now the corner of Irvine Boulevard and Jamboree Road--and surveyed the thousands of open acres around him. He had an unobstructed, horseshoe-shaped view of the San Gabriel and Santa Ana mountains, of the Tustin hills that are now called Lemon Heights, of the San Joaquin Hills that stretch toward Laguna Beach. Irvine Ranch, his land was called.
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