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James J Mori

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1992
James J. Mori, a seismologist and volcano researcher who worked on study projects in Japan and New Guinea, has been named director of the U.S. Geological Survey's Pasadena field office, it was announced Thursday. Mori, 36, replaces Thomas H. Heaton under the Geological Survey's policy of periodically rotating management assignments. Heaton, who will remain in Pasadena, served as office director for seven years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1992
James J. Mori, a seismologist and volcano researcher who worked on study projects in Japan and New Guinea, has been named director of the U.S. Geological Survey's Pasadena field office, it was announced Thursday. Mori, 36, replaces Thomas H. Heaton under the Geological Survey's policy of periodically rotating management assignments. Heaton, who will remain in Pasadena, served as office director for seven years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Drawing on real-life disaster stories, American Red Cross officials on Tuesday urged about 100 Ventura County business leaders to improve their emergency preparedness plans. In a short but hard-hitting lineup, speakers touched on the devastation of Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii, Hurricane Andrew in Florida and numerous earthquakes in California, which geologists believe are a prelude to the Big One.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1994 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chances of a major earthquake in Ventura County have increased slightly since Monday's magnitude 6.6 quake that devastated parts of Ventura and Los Angeles counties, quake experts said Tuesday. "But that chance is very slight," said Lucille M. Jones, a scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey at Caltech. "Only about 5% or 10% of the time is an earthquake followed by another in the same general area."
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It isn't that Caltech earthquake geologist James Dolan ducks every time he drives under a freeway overpass. But he does think twice before taking a window seat in a restaurant. He avoids old brick buildings in downtown Los Angeles. And he orients himself by fault lines--two blocks from the Hollywood fault, or maybe a couple of miles from the Newport-Inglewood fault. When The Big One strikes, Dolan knows what he has to do next: head to Caltech in Pasadena or the San Andreas fault.
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