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James J Whitey Bulger

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NEWS
September 30, 2000 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One brother went bad. The other chose respectability. This week, the paths of legendary gangster James J. "Whitey" Bulger--a fugitive since 1995--and his brother William Bulger--former head of this state's Senate and now president of the University of Massachusetts--are colliding in a highly public way.
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NATIONAL
March 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The state's highest court ruled in Boston that a brother of fugitive mobster James "Whitey" Bulger must forfeit his $65,000 state pension because he admitted lying to grand juries investigating the gangster's disappearance. Lawyers for John Bulger, 67, a retired court clerk magistrate, had argued that his crimes were based on family loyalty and didn't affect his job. The Supreme Judicial Court disagreed.
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NATIONAL
April 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A brother of gangster James "Whitey" Bulger pleaded guilty to perjury and obstruction of justice for lying to two federal grand juries investigating his sibling. John "Jackie" Bulger, 65, a retired clerk magistrate of Boston Juvenile Court, admitted he had contact with his brother since he became a fugitive in 1995, contrary to what he told a grand jury in 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2005 | Dana Parsons
For now, he's merely the "Senior Citizen Bandit" -- an elderly man believed to have held up three Orange County banks in the last week. Much more intriguing, however, is whether there's any chance under the warm California sun that he's James "Whitey" Bulger, a crime figure legend in Boston and on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted list. The bureau hasn't linked him to the Orange County robberies, the latest of which was Thursday in Laguna Niguel.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The state's highest court ruled in Boston that a brother of fugitive mobster James "Whitey" Bulger must forfeit his $65,000 state pension because he admitted lying to grand juries investigating the gangster's disappearance. Lawyers for John Bulger, 67, a retired court clerk magistrate, had argued that his crimes were based on family loyalty and didn't affect his job. The Supreme Judicial Court disagreed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2005 | Dana Parsons
For now, he's merely the "Senior Citizen Bandit" -- an elderly man believed to have held up three Orange County banks in the last week. Much more intriguing, however, is whether there's any chance under the warm California sun that he's James "Whitey" Bulger, a crime figure legend in Boston and on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted list. The bureau hasn't linked him to the Orange County robberies, the latest of which was Thursday in Laguna Niguel.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
MASSACHUSETTS A retired FBI agent went on trial in Boston on charges he let two high-ranking mob informants literally get away with murder. John Connolly, 61, is charged with racketeering, obstruction of justice and conspiracy for allegedly protecting James J. "Whitey" Bulger and Stephen "The Rifleman" Flemmi from prosecution, and for providing the reputed gangsters with confidential law enforcement information.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A brother of fugitive mobster James J. "Whitey" Bulger was given a six-month sentence in Boston for lying about his contacts with the outlaw. John "Jackie" Bulger, 62, also received three years' probation, the first six months of which must be served in home confinement, and was fined $3,000. Another brother, William M. Bulger, resigned under fire as president of the University of Massachusetts over his own contacts with his mobster brother.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
A former FBI supervisor testified Thursday that he took bribes of wine and cash that retired Agent John J. Connolly delivered to him from top-ranking mob informers. John Morris, Connolly's boss when he handled James J. "Whitey" Bulger and Stephen "The Rifleman" Flemmi, took the stand on the second day of Connolly's trial on charges of racketeering, obstruction of justice and conspiracy.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
BOSTON -- There were dozens of sordid details that have helped illuminate the personality and actions of James J. “Whitey” Bulger during his two-month trial and two-day sentencing hearing. But Margaret Small paid close attention to one detail in particular -- Bulger's posture as he sat in court, day after day, listening to witnesses testify against him and family members rebuke him for his actions. Small is a courtroom artist, and attended every day of the Bulger trial, producing giant sketches: Bulger in an orange jumpsuit, Bulger's lawyers arguing a point, family members of Bulger's victims struggling with their emotions as they testified.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A brother of gangster James "Whitey" Bulger pleaded guilty to perjury and obstruction of justice for lying to two federal grand juries investigating his sibling. John "Jackie" Bulger, 65, a retired clerk magistrate of Boston Juvenile Court, admitted he had contact with his brother since he became a fugitive in 1995, contrary to what he told a grand jury in 1998.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One brother went bad. The other chose respectability. This week, the paths of legendary gangster James J. "Whitey" Bulger--a fugitive since 1995--and his brother William Bulger--former head of this state's Senate and now president of the University of Massachusetts--are colliding in a highly public way.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
BOSTON - Every morning at dawn, a small line forms outside the federal courthouse here as residents old and young jostle for a seat on a hard wooden bench in courtroom No. 11. They come to watch the trial of James J. "Whitey" Bulger, the mob boss who was arrested in 2011 in Santa Monica after 16 years on the lam, and is now facing 19 counts of murder. For many who have waited in line, and for much of the city, Bulger's case feels plucked from a movie about the Boston of days past, when mobsters were gunned down on the street, authorities accepted bribes and a network of white Irish Catholic criminals and FBI agents ran amok.
NEWS
May 24, 1998 | ERICA NOONAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The retired FBI agent walked to the witness stand, still looking the part of a G-man. Gray suit. Nondescript tie. Silver hair. Eyes straight ahead. Then came the questions that made him squirm, questions about a past he really didn't care to talk about. Had he, John Morris, former chief of the FBI's Boston organized crime unit, exchanged Christmas gifts of books and liquor with mobsters James J. "Whitey" Bulger and Stephen "The Rifleman" Flemmi? Yes, answered Morris.
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