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NEWS
May 24, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont has told aides and fellow lawmakers he will announce today that he is quitting the Republican Party, a decision that would hand Democrats command of the Senate, stymie President Bush on several policy fronts and offer a lesson in how one man's change of heart can alter the course of politics. Jeffords initially planned to reveal his intentions on the Senate floor Wednesday, and official Washington braced for an unexpected shift of power in the Senate.
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NATIONAL
April 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Four of President Bush's nominations for top jobs at the Environmental Protection Agency were put on hold Wednesday by Sen. James M. Jeffords (I-Vt.), who said he was protesting the agency's refusal to provide him documents over the last three years. Jeffords said he had been "stonewalled in getting information from the EPA," and pointed to 12 unmet requests for documents between May 2001, when he left the Republican Party and became an independent, and January 2004.
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NEWS
September 30, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, crusading to sell its health care plan on Capitol Hill, won its first GOP convert Wednesday as moderate Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont agreed to sign on as a co-sponsor of the White House bill that will be submitted to Congress within a few weeks. Jeffords made his announcement as First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton testified before the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, of which he is a member.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont has told aides and fellow lawmakers he will announce today that he is quitting the Republican Party, a decision that would hand Democrats command of the Senate, stymie President Bush on several policy fronts and offer a lesson in how one man's change of heart can alter the course of politics. Jeffords initially planned to reveal his intentions on the Senate floor Wednesday, and official Washington braced for an unexpected shift of power in the Senate.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key Republican senator said Wednesday that he will vote to confirm Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr. as surgeon general, making it increasingly likely that the troubled nomination will survive committee action and be sent to the Senate floor for a vote. "I am confident in my own mind that you should be approved by this committee," said Sen. James M.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the nonprofit Peace and Justice Center here, wedged between the Laura Ashley and Eddie Bauer stores on a main street that bans cars and blasts taped classical music, Rocky Steeves and Kathy Bouton were discussing their state's junior senator. "He's a different kind of Republican," said Steeves, 30, of the legislator who is suddenly in the national glare as a potential swing vote in President Clinton's Senate impeachment trial. "He's a good Republican," agreed Bouton, 47.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Four of President Bush's nominations for top jobs at the Environmental Protection Agency were put on hold Wednesday by Sen. James M. Jeffords (I-Vt.), who said he was protesting the agency's refusal to provide him documents over the last three years. Jeffords said he had been "stonewalled in getting information from the EPA," and pointed to 12 unmet requests for documents between May 2001, when he left the Republican Party and became an independent, and January 2004.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Locals in Vermont refer to Republican Sen. James M. Jeffords as "Jeezum Jim," because he often stumbles into his sentences by muttering, "Aw jeez, um . . . . " But the lawmaker whose single vote could control the fate of President Bush's budget policy made his position clear Thursday after yet another negotiating round with White House officials. As the talks ended, Jeffords told Vice President Dick Cheney that they didn't have a deal.
NEWS
November 18, 2003 | J. Michael Kennedy
With a spate of incidents involving not-quite-domesticated wild animals fresh in the news, including the mauling of tiger trainer and illusionist Roy Horn, the U.S. Senate has passed a bill cracking down on the burgeoning trade in exotic big cats. The bill would ban interstate and foreign commerce in dangerous exotic animals, including lions, tigers, leopards, cheetahs, jaguars and cougars.
NEWS
May 25, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still in charge for now, Senate Republicans rushed Thursday to push through conservative attorney Theodore B. Olson's confirmation as solicitor general by a narrow vote, in the face of attacks from Democrats on his hard-line politics and his candor. The 51-47 vote marks a hard-fought win for Olson in his ascension to a coveted job as the figurative "10th justice" on the U.S. Supreme Court, charged with arguing the federal government's cases before the high court.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Locals in Vermont refer to Republican Sen. James M. Jeffords as "Jeezum Jim," because he often stumbles into his sentences by muttering, "Aw jeez, um . . . . " But the lawmaker whose single vote could control the fate of President Bush's budget policy made his position clear Thursday after yet another negotiating round with White House officials. As the talks ended, Jeffords told Vice President Dick Cheney that they didn't have a deal.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the nonprofit Peace and Justice Center here, wedged between the Laura Ashley and Eddie Bauer stores on a main street that bans cars and blasts taped classical music, Rocky Steeves and Kathy Bouton were discussing their state's junior senator. "He's a different kind of Republican," said Steeves, 30, of the legislator who is suddenly in the national glare as a potential swing vote in President Clinton's Senate impeachment trial. "He's a good Republican," agreed Bouton, 47.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key Republican senator said Wednesday that he will vote to confirm Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr. as surgeon general, making it increasingly likely that the troubled nomination will survive committee action and be sent to the Senate floor for a vote. "I am confident in my own mind that you should be approved by this committee," said Sen. James M.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, crusading to sell its health care plan on Capitol Hill, won its first GOP convert Wednesday as moderate Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont agreed to sign on as a co-sponsor of the White House bill that will be submitted to Congress within a few weeks. Jeffords made his announcement as First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton testified before the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, of which he is a member.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Senate named a 12-member committee today to hear evidence in the impeachment trial of U.S. District Judge Walter L. Nixon of Mississippi, who is serving a five-year prison term for perjury. Appointed to the evidence-hearing committee were Sens. Wyche Fowler (D-Ga.), Howell Heflin (D-Ala.), Timothy Wirth (D-Colo.), Harry Reid (D-Nev.), Charles Robb (D-Va.), Herbert Kohl (D-Wis.), Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), John C. Danforth (R-Mo.), John Chafee (R-R.I.), Frank Murkowski (R-Alaska)
OPINION
January 5, 2002
Re "Jeffords Explains Why He Quit the GOP," letters, Jan. 2: It is very hard to apply logic to the shallow reasoning of people blasting Sen. James Jeffords of Vermont; they act as if an elected official does not have the right to go against his party. I'm sure many of those same individuals were delightedly mute when the Dixiecrats (mostly elected Democrats) spurned their own party. When I go into a voting booth (even though I am registered with a particular party) I do not feel that I must vote for only people of that party--that is blatantly ridiculous and, in my book, decidedly un-American.
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