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James Joy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1992 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police officer said Thursday that she was raped by a fellow officer, but the department launched an investigation of her private life rather than probe of her assailant's actions. In a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, Officer Teresa Wallin said Officer James Joy, assigned to the elite Metropolitan Division, raped her last May 30 after driving her home from a bar on the Police Academy's grounds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1992 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police officer said Thursday that she was raped by a fellow officer, but the department launched an investigation of her private life rather than probe of her assailant's actions. In a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, Officer Teresa Wallin said Officer James Joy, assigned to the elite Metropolitan Division, raped her last May 30 after driving her home from a bar on the Police Academy's grounds.
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NEWS
September 26, 1992
A veteran Los Angeles police officer was cleared by a departmental board of rights on four counts of sexually assaulting a female officer, LAPD officials said Friday. However, James Joy, 37, a member of the elite Metropolitan Division, was found guilty of improperly using a police vehicle while off duty. Joy was given a three-day suspension by the board of high-ranking police officials, which could be reduced or eliminated by Chief Willie L. Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
We can deduce what city we're in, and we haven't even seen a skyline. It's elementary, Watson. The fog. "The Mask of Moriarty," Hugh Leonard's Sherlock Holmes spoof, at the Old Globe Theatre, starts with a thick blanket of fog on Waterloo Bridge in London. But unlike the fog in a straight-up detective story, this one demands comment, and a couple of characters are overcome by hacking coughs in the play's opening moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judith Shubow Steir is enamored with the love affair of Edward VIII and Wallis Warfield Simpson. Steir's rose-colored musical "Only a Kingdom," which opened Sunday at the Pasadena Playhouse, makes the celebrity lovebirds who became the Duke and Duchess of Windsor after he gave up the British throne for her in 1936 clear-cut heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Cole Porter is reported to have called his 1938 "You Never Know" the worst musical he ever wrote. He was having a bad day. He suffered the riding accident that crushed his legs at the time he wrote it. And he was fending off the Shuberts who wanted a bigger show with dancing girls and production numbers. Guess who won. It was not a big success. The show of the same name that opened Sunday at the Pasadena Playhouse has none of that.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2001 | LINDA WINER, NEWSDAY
The smartly dressed young African American with the trumpet has an opening speech about wanting his music "to hide where I came from and to hide who I am." What cannot be guessed from those words alone, however, is that Reuben Clark, the engaging fellow in Charles Randolph-Wright's memory play-with-music, is not running from a life we know by heart from the usual mean streets of stage and screen. Not even close.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2000 | DON BRAUNAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Modern directors often don't win with "Love's Labour's Lost." It is Shakespeare's first and most verbal comedy, thin on action and plot and believed to have been originally written for a small group of intellectuals rather than the public. Its abundant wordplay is heavy with rhymes, puns and references increasingly obscure to current audiences. And finally, unlike his other comedies, it doesn't end with happy weddings for all. Roger Rees, however, has surmounted those obstacles.
SPORTS
August 23, 1989 | PETE THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
A district court judge in Boulder, Colo., declared the University of Colorado's athletic drug testing unconstitutional Tuesday and ordered the school to discontinue the program, but a spokesman for the National Collegiate Athletic Assn. said the decision will not affect its policy of testing athletes involved in postseason play. "They have their policy (at Colorado) and we have ours," said James Marchiony, NCAA director of communications.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The year is 1921. Henry Ford invites Warren G. Harding on a camping trip, with a motive more sinister than roasting marshmallows. Presidentially ambitious himself, Ford plans to blackmail President Harding into leaving office. It almost works. But then Ford starts bragging about how he's going to get rid of the Jews once he gets in office. So another camper, Thomas Edison, who has heretofore ignored Ford's anti-Semitic remarks, threatens in turn to blackmail Ford.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
By giving "Twelfth Night" the subtitle "What You Will," Shakespeare more or less invited anyone to play around with his comedy. But surely no one has done it with more fizz and ebullience than director Sheldon Epps and company in "Play On!" First developed at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego, "Play On!" is now at the Pasadena Playhouse, where Epps is artistic director. It's a splurge for the playhouse, affordable only because Arizona Theatre Company is co-producing.
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