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James Joyce

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OPINION
July 3, 1994
Re "James Joyce, Hibernian and Cybernaut," by Brian Stonehill, Commentary, June 16: When the great Irish playwright Brendan Behan was asked what he thought of James Joyce, he often replied, "What do you think of yourself?" The works of Joyce, especially "Ulysses," are about everyman, the imprisoned and the free. Each man is imprisoned by physical realities, but is free to create and explore by introspection, communication, both spoken and written, and deeds of action. As Stonehill reminds us, Joyce communicates in "Ulysses" a myriad of information colors that apply to contemporary cybernetics.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Although critically acclaimed, “The Dead,” based on James Joyce's final offering from his short-story collection, “Dubliners,” ran for just 120 performances on Broadway in 2000. That a musical so bravely unassuming should have gotten to Broadway at all is a marvel. Yet this charming chamber piece contains quiet virtues too seldom on display in the commercial theater.  Now at the Greenway Court Theatre - a remounting of an Open Fist Theatre production from several years back - this “Dead” has obvious flaws, including the cast's singing voices, which can be described only as modest, and some wildly errant Irish accents that come and go. Yet in Charles Otte's original staging, those quiet virtues remain much in evidence.  As for the imperfect vocalizing, it seems oddly apt for this impromptu Christmas musicale at the home of the beloved Misses Morkan (Jacque Lynn Colton and Judith Scarpone)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
What do a National Book Award-winning novelist and popular TV host Stephen Colbert talk about when they get together? "Fifty Shades of Grey," of course. And also James Joyce. Colum McCann, who won the National Book Award for his novel "Let the Great World Spin," appeared on the Colbert Report last week and it's too good to miss. Not because it's Colbert's funniest segment -- it's not -- but in it he really seems to want to talk about books. Colbert says that has read James Joyce's "Ulysses" but not E.L. James "Fifty Shades of Grey" (though that may have changed .)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
What do a National Book Award-winning novelist and popular TV host Stephen Colbert talk about when they get together? "Fifty Shades of Grey," of course. And also James Joyce. Colum McCann, who won the National Book Award for his novel "Let the Great World Spin," appeared on the Colbert Report last week and it's too good to miss. Not because it's Colbert's funniest segment -- it's not -- but in it he really seems to want to talk about books. Colbert says that has read James Joyce's "Ulysses" but not E.L. James "Fifty Shades of Grey" (though that may have changed .)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2000
Don Gifford, 81, cultural historian and authority on James Joyce. Gifford taught English and American studies at Williams College for 33 years, retiring in 1984. He was known to lovers of Joyce for his 1974 book, "Notes for Joyce: An Annotation of James Joyce's 'Ulysses,' " which he wrote with Robert J. Seidman. The work is still available in a revised edition titled " 'Ulysses' Annotated," published by the University of California Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2004 | From Associated Press
An anonymous bidder paid the equivalent of $445,000 for a raunchy letter written by the author James Joyce to his partner and lifelong love, Nora Barnacle, in 1909. Sotheby's said the sale last week was a record for a 20th century letter in English sold at auction -- and was more than four times what had been expected. A scholar discovered it by chance in the pages of an old book held by Joyce's brother Stanislaus.
NEWS
April 14, 1990
Richard M. Kain, 81, an authority and prolific author on writer James Joyce. A retired professor of English and Irish literature at the University of Louisville, Kain had served as trustee of the James Joyce Foundation and was on the editorial board of James Joyce Quarterly. Among his books were "Joyce: The Man, the Work, the Reputation" and "Dublin in the Age of W.B. Yeats and James Joyce." In Louisville on April 5.
NEWS
May 16, 1987
Richard Ellmann, considered the pre-eminent biographer of James Joyce and a professor emeritus of English literature at Oxford University, died Wednesday in Oxford. He was 69 and, although crippled with Lou Gehrig's disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), had continued to work on his most recent biography, that of Oscar Wilde.
BOOKS
July 20, 1986 | Jackson I. Cope, Cope is Leo S. Bing Professor of English at USC. Among his books is "Joyce's Cities: Archaeologies of the Soul" (1981). and
"Ulysses" was written under adverse circumstances over seven years, mangled by poor typing, by James Joyce's obsession with massive additions even upon proof sheets, and by the errors inherent in having this English text set by French printers. But the book, like its author, thrived on adversity: It was a long-heralded literary event when the first edition was presented to Joyce in Paris on his 40th birthday, Feb. 2, 1922.
BOOKS
October 31, 1999 | THOMAS FLANAGAN, Thomas Flanagan is the author of several novels, including "The Tenants of Time" and "The Year of the French."
James Joyce liberated the literary language of the English-speaking nations, including, among others, his own.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Today is Blumesday --not a typo, as it turns out, but a holiday concocted to celebrate the beloved young-adult author Judy Blume. Bloomsday, which honors James Joyce's "Ulysses," took place on Sunday.  As NPR reports , Blumesday was created by writers Joanna Miller and Heather Larimer, who, try as they might, found they were never quite able to embrace Joyce's vast novel. "We sort of self-deprecatingly said, 'Well the only way we could participate in Bloomsday was if it were Judy Blumesday.' And then the joke turned into, 'Wait, why aren't we doing this?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
James Joyce fans know that June 16 is Bloomsday, the single day in which all of his seminal novel "Ulysses" takes place. But as the video above reveals in its first seconds, not everyone is a James Joyce fan. It's the trailer for the documentary "Get in Bed with Ulysses," which is screening this Bloomsday at several Southern California locations. The film -- made by Joyce fans Alan Adelson and Kate Taverna -- is a fascinating, human look at the author and "Ulysses," his most famous novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Readers in China have been snapping up copies of James Joyce's notoriously difficult novel "Finnegan's Wake," published in Chinese for the first time. Its publisher says that the first print run sold out in five weeks. The Associated Press reports that the book was No. 2 on Shanghai's "good books" bestseller list -- its serious reads -- second only to a new biography of Deng Xiaoping. One reason for its popularity may be advertising. The Chinese translation of "Finnegan's Wake" is said to be the first book to be the subject of a billboard campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Will Self joined us from the office of his London publisher, Bloomsbury, to talk about his challenging new novel "Umbrella. " It was shortlisted for the 2012 Man Booker Prize. Just released in the U.S. by Grove/Atlantic, "Umbrella" is told in stream-of-consciousness form, following in the footsteps of high modernists such as Virginia Woolf and James Joyce. While some have called it a masterpiece , its style has put off some readers, who find it too difficult. Does that mean that writing in styles made famous by Joyce and Woolf is somehow still avant-garde, nearly a century later?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012
So you're an admirer of James Joyce's "Ulysses"? Well, thank Trieste for that book. Why? Gordon Bowker's "James Joyce: A New Biography" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 608 pp., $35) shows readers how living in that seaport city in northeastern Italy helped rekindle Joyce's enthusiasm after the lackluster reception of "Dubliners" and his uncertainty over what readers would think of "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. " The city not only gave him and wife Nora an income, it gave Joyce, as a teacher, an exceptional pupil: the writer Ettore Schmitz, known by the pen name Italo Svevo.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
To lovers of James Joyce and Irish literature, June 16 has a special significance. It's known as Bloomsday, named for Leopold Bloom, the main character in Joyce's "Ulysses. " The notoriously challenging novel blasted through formal conventions and become an iconic work of modernist fiction; its 600-plus pages take place in Dublin over the course of a single day, June 16, 1904. And on Saturday, Angelenos can celebrate the occasion by attending dramatic readings, listening to Irish music and naturally raising a glass of Guinness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1994 | BRIAN STONEHILL, Brian Stonehill, coordinator of the media-studies program at Pomona College, is the author of "The Self-Conscious Novel: Artifice in Fiction from Joyce to Pynchon" (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1989).
"Stately, plump Buck Mulligan"--the first four words of James Joyce's "Ulysses"--are being intoned today in pubs and reading rooms around the world. Meanwhile, so-called virtual celebrations of Bloomsday are filling cyberspace with echoes of the novel's final word, "Yes." What does it all mean?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2005 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
"Chikka chu, chikka chu, chikka chu." A trio of actors repeats the line over and over, picking up the pace and then letting it lag, raising the volume and then lowering it. They're mimicking the sounds of a train as it departs Paris, carrying the great Irish writer James Joyce and his wife, Nora Barnacle. And right now, the "chikka chus" are the subject of intense discussion. How long should they go on? At what speed? What volume?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012
An oil painting by Mark Rothko sold for $86.9 million at a Christie's auction in New York, setting a record for the Abstract Expressionist painter. Rothko's "Orange, Red, Yellow," which dates from 1961, was being sold by the estate of David Pincus, a Philadelphia clothing manufacturer and philanthropist who died last year. Pincus was actively involved with the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The buyer at Tuesday's auction has not been identified. The previous record for a Rothko work was the $72.8 million paid for "White Center" in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Jim Ruland, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Often started, seldom finished. That's the knock on James Joyce's "Ulysses. " Everyone knows Buck Mulligan is "stately" and "plump," but by the time Stephen Dedalus' allusive stream of consciousness gives way to Leopold Bloom's humanist point of view in the fourth chapter, many readers have given up. Too long. Too wordy. Too confusing. However, for those who have tried to read "Ulysses" but were unable to finish (or thought about it and said they did), two new books offer something of a corrective.
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