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James Kelman

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NEWS
April 6, 1995 | JONATHAN KING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Booker Prize, awarded annually to a writer of fiction working in the United Kingdom and its dispersed empire, may be the most highly regarded such honor in the English-speaking world.
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BOOKS
November 18, 2001 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
Scottish writer James Kelman's latest book is titled "Translated Accounts." The preface states that "these 'translated accounts' are by three, four or more individuals domiciled in an occupied territory or land where a form of martial law appears in operation.... While all are 'first hand' they have been transcribed and/or translated into English, not always by persons native to the tongue" and in some cases, as Kelman admits, appear to have been translated by machine.
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BOOKS
April 10, 1988 | Nicholas Jenkins, Jenkins is an English short story writer who lives in New York. and
James Kelman is an exceptionally raw and, in his own way, ambitious writer. His stories move carefully and obsessively through demoralized Scottish lives, yet for all his narrow focus and use of jagged regional idioms, he is a prose stylist with international literary affiliations. Naturally, then, English reviewers have already gone down on their knees in front of "Greyhound for Breakfast." And well they might.
NEWS
February 27, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The mechanism for awarding literary prizes now consists of three steps--selection, announcement and dust-up. The last stage is a new, yet integral phenomenon, for it no longer seems possible to celebrate a book without having someone else come along to take offense on grounds real or imagined, for a book's rudeness, immorality, favoritism, its lack of balance, of sensitivity of good intention.
BOOKS
November 18, 2001 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
Scottish writer James Kelman's latest book is titled "Translated Accounts." The preface states that "these 'translated accounts' are by three, four or more individuals domiciled in an occupied territory or land where a form of martial law appears in operation.... While all are 'first hand' they have been transcribed and/or translated into English, not always by persons native to the tongue" and in some cases, as Kelman admits, appear to have been translated by machine.
BOOKS
January 27, 2008 | Thomas McGonigle, Thomas McGonigle is the author of "Going to Patchogue" and "The Corpse Dream of N. Petkov."
Years from now, when Scotland achieves independence from the British, just imagine: There will appear on a celebratory dais a number of doddering survivors from that group of writers who put Scotland on the international literary map: Alasdair Gray, Jeff Torrington, Agnes Owens, James Kelman, Janice Galloway and A.L. Kennedy. (We know this from the pertinent examples of Ireland and Estonia: genuine independence always proceeds from a startling reappearance of a long-suppressed cultural identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Richard Rayner
Alan Sillitoe, now in his 80s, grew up in Nottingham, in the English midlands, in the kind of squalor and poverty that, a century earlier, gave Charles Dickens nightmares. Sillitoe's father was a violent drunk; his mother, on occasion, was forced to prostitute herself. The family, constantly fighting to stay one step ahead of debt and rent collectors, was often on the move, dodging from one squalid tenement to the next, wheeling their belongings in a hand-cart. An abiding memory of his childhood, Sillitoe has written, was of his father raising his fist and his mother pleading: "Not in the face."
BOOKS
March 25, 2007 | Richard Rayner, Richard Rayner is the author of several books, most recently the novel "The Devil's Wind."
SET in the fictitious small fishing town of Monimaskit, somewhere north of Edinburgh on Scotland's bleak and beautiful east coast, "The Testament of Gideon Mack" is a tantalizing triptych, a confession written by Mack and discovered after his apparent suicide that is flanked by the prologue and epilogue of an editor who has proposed to publish it. Though this is Scottish writer James Robertson's third novel, "Testament" is his first published in the United States.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | JONATHAN KING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Booker Prize, awarded annually to a writer of fiction working in the United Kingdom and its dispersed empire, may be the most highly regarded such honor in the English-speaking world.
NEWS
February 27, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The mechanism for awarding literary prizes now consists of three steps--selection, announcement and dust-up. The last stage is a new, yet integral phenomenon, for it no longer seems possible to celebrate a book without having someone else come along to take offense on grounds real or imagined, for a book's rudeness, immorality, favoritism, its lack of balance, of sensitivity of good intention.
BOOKS
April 10, 1988 | Nicholas Jenkins, Jenkins is an English short story writer who lives in New York. and
James Kelman is an exceptionally raw and, in his own way, ambitious writer. His stories move carefully and obsessively through demoralized Scottish lives, yet for all his narrow focus and use of jagged regional idioms, he is a prose stylist with international literary affiliations. Naturally, then, English reviewers have already gone down on their knees in front of "Greyhound for Breakfast." And well they might.
BOOKS
August 18, 1996 | Charlotte Innes, Charlotte Innes Once worked for D.C. Thomson, a Scottish newspaper company. She is a regular contributor to the Book Review
Every now and again a work of fiction accidentally brings into focus something that has been lurking foggily on the edges of our collective psyches. Suddenly the book is not simply a work of art but a cultural icon--the expression of a prevailing mood or moment in history. For a critic, whose touchstone must always be the question, "Is it art?," groping a way through the snowstorm of hype surrounding such literary events can be a real mind-twister.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
WHEN my son was a bit younger than he is now, he was looked after by a Salvadoran nanny, whose young daughter attended school with our boy. In the late afternoon, the two children would sit in the kitchen doing their homework together. When the nanny spoke to them it was invariably in Spanish, and they would reply in the normative form of that language. If I happened by and said something to them, it usually was in English, and they'd answer similarly.
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