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James Kolstad

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NEWS
January 23, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush announced Monday that he will nominate James Kolstad as chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board. Kolstad has been serving as acting chairman since 1988.
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NEWS
January 23, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush announced Monday that he will nominate James Kolstad as chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board. Kolstad has been serving as acting chairman since 1988.
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NEWS
January 25, 1987 | Associated Press
James L. Kolstad, vice president of a Colorado consulting firm, will be nominated as a member of the National Transportation Safety Board, the White House announced Friday.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | Associated Press
The driver of the truck that hit a school bus in Texas last fall, sending it into a water-filled pit and killing 21 students, should have been able to stop despite faulty brakes, the National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday. The small number of emergency exits--only two--contributed to the deaths, the board said. NTSB Chairman James Kolstad said driver Ruben Perez "did not respond soon enough and he did not respond aggressively enough."
BUSINESS
September 19, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Federal Aviation Administration today ordered a detailed inspection in the fan disks of all DC-10 engines similar to the one investigators believe failed before this summer's Iowa crash landing that killed 112 people. FAA Administrator James B. Busey announced the formal inspections before a congressional panel, where he and National Transportation Safety Board Chairman James Kolstad both declared the DC-10 jumbo jet safe.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From United Press International
A top federal safety official told Congress on Thursday that a crack in a jet engine rotor suspected in the United Air Lines Flight 232 crash may have formed the first time the engine was cranked up. James Kolstad, acting chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, also told the House Science, Space and Technology's aviation subcommittee that it is still unclear whether the crack could have been detected during the last engine inspection before the crash.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
The nation's top aviation official and the head of the board investigating the DC-10 crash in Iowa both told Congress on Tuesday that the jetliners are safe but also called for mandatory inspections and changes. James B. Busey, head of the Federal Aviation Administration, announced an order to inspect the fan disks of 220 DC-10 engines similar to the one investigators believe failed before the July 19 crash of a United Airlines DC-10 in Sioux City, Iowa, which killed 112 people.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
More safety features are needed on the nation's 41,000 small school buses to protect children in accidents, the head of the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday. James Kolstad, acting board chairman, said an investigation into the buses that make up 10% to 15% of the total school bus fleet shows that injuries to students in accidents generally have been minor.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | From Associated Press
A cruise ship that burned in the North Sea last year, killing 159 people, had rotten lifeboats and missing or insufficient fire alarms, it was reported Wednesday. A panel appointed by the governments of Norway, Sweden and Denmark found that the U.S. Coast Guard and Miami-based SeaEscape cruise line failed to detect the defects before the Scandinavian Star was transferred to a Danish company, the Miami Herald said.
NEWS
July 7, 1989
The National Transportation Safety Board voted to seek safety regulation of foreign-registered cruise ships that carry thousands of American passengers a day from U.S. ports. The recommendation came after the board ruled that lack of maintenance, lack of fire-fighting procedures and poor crew training caused a nearly catastrophic 1988 fire aboard a Bahamian vessel carrying 700 people.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
The National Transportation Safety Board recommended Tuesday that children now flying free in parents' arms be required to sit in separate safety seats on airliners. "All objects must be secured during takeoff and landing, including coffee pots and luggage," said board Chairman James Kolstad. "And yet infants, our precious children, are not." The proposal, approved 4 to 0 by the safety board, does not deal with who will provide the seats or whether fares will be charged for the infants.
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