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James Kruse

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BUSINESS
June 11, 1992 | DALLAS M. JACKSON
Position: Water polo color commentator for NBC during the Olympics. After that, "my carriage turns into a pumpkin, and I'll go back to working for Schneider Commercial Real Estate" in Orange. Also a water polo commentator for Prime Ticket on a free-lance basis. Birth date: Nov. 24, 1952. Residence: Los Angeles.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 1992 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Kruse has been participating in the summer Olympics since 1976. A member of the U.S. water polo team in the Bicentennial year, he returned in 1984 and 1988 as a TV commentator. He will be in Spain for the games next month, once again anchoring the water polo events. Much has changed since his stint four years ago. Vice President Bush has become President Bush. Communism has fallen. And commercial real estate--Kruse's other vocation--has hit the skids.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 1992 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Kruse has been participating in the summer Olympics since 1976. A member of the U.S. water polo team in the Bicentennial year, he returned in 1984 and 1988 as a TV commentator. He will be in Spain for the games next month, once again anchoring the water polo events. Much has changed since his stint four years ago. Vice President Bush has become President Bush. Communism has fallen. And commercial real estate--Kruse's other vocation--has hit the skids.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1992 | DALLAS M. JACKSON
Position: Water polo color commentator for NBC during the Olympics. After that, "my carriage turns into a pumpkin, and I'll go back to working for Schneider Commercial Real Estate" in Orange. Also a water polo commentator for Prime Ticket on a free-lance basis. Birth date: Nov. 24, 1952. Residence: Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1991
Barry Bearak and David Lauter's three-part series regarding affirmative action (Nov. 3-5) was interesting and thought-provoking. Biases crept through at times, particularly with the use of the term "reverse discrimination." Discrimination exists--or it doesn't--in any particular occurrence. What is "reversed" at times is our ability to detect and label discrimination.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
The first American College Theater Festival to be sponsored in San Diego begins this week, which means that Southwestern College in Chula Vista--the only San Diego college to be selected as a finalist for the 20-year-old festival--is going to save a lot on traveling costs. At the competition, one of 12 regional contests throughout the country, Southwestern will recreate its November production of "Hair" at 8 p.m. at San Diego State University's Don Powell Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN DEMAC
If wishes were horses, there would be a stableful neighing at a tiny but determined little theater space up the stairs at Busalacchi's Ristorante. A local actress, Paula Pierson, is renting the spot for "Stop The World--I Want To Get Off" through July 26. This dated but often charming Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley musical into which Pierson is throwing her energy, money and hope is the very first production of her theater company, Chrysalis Productions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1992
I know that it is politically incorrect to discuss--or even acknowledge--our blatant discrimination against men, especially unmarried fathers. Your editorial ends with seven rhetorical questions. Here are a few clues to consider: - Our most dearly held stereotypes continue to be the nurturing woman (work is an option) and the instrumental, money-earning man (nurturing is an option). Men are trained to view themselves as secondary parents. - Social programming is primarily designed for women and children, with "father absent or incapacitated" guidelines for many benefits.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1995 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We may never know if "life is perfected by death," as the poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning said. But it is certain that life cannot be fully embraced without accepting death as part of the same continuum. Scott McPherson's darkly witty and penetrating 1990 play, "Marvin's Room," continuing through Sunday at the Gaslamp Quarter Theatre Company's Hahn Cosmopolitan, accomplishes the feat of bringing the specter of dying alongside the living in a loving and heartbreakingly natural way.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They don't make sitcoms like "Gilligan's Island" anymore. * There is a reason, and it's aptly demonstrated by "Gilligan's Island: The Musical," now in its West Coast premiere at The Theatre in Old Town. It's just, well, goofy. Silly. A comic version of "No Exit" mixed with a child's-eye view of the American melting pot.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A brisk double bill of Moliere plays has capered onto the Old Globe Theatre stage, as frisky as a young colt with all its tumbles and tricks, as collectively exuberant as a college class and just as wet behind the ears. This is good news and bad.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1997 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "American Pie," Don McLean sang of "the day the music died," a not-so-thinly-veiled reference to the death of Buddy Holly in a plane crash in 1959. But the only music that died, really, were tunes the 22-year-old rock sensation from Lubbock, Texas, never got to write. Almost 40 years later, it's a thrill to hear Holly's songs burning up the stage at the San Diego Repertory Theatre in "Buddy . . . The Buddy Holly Story," running through July 13.
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