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James L Brooks

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1990
ABC made its long-simmering deal with Emmy- and Oscar-winning writer-producer-director James L. Brooks official Thursday, announcing that it had signed him to an exclusive contract under which his company, Gracie Films, will develop at least three comedy series for the network. Gracie Films will continue to produce "The Tracey Ullman Show" and "The Simpsons" for Fox Broadcasting. Unlike ABC's exclusive deal with writer-producer Steven Bochco ("Doogie Howser, M.D."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Polly Platt, the Oscar-nominated production designer of such films as "The Last Picture Show" and "Terms of Endearment" and producer of "Broadcast News" and "Say Anything," has died. She was 72. Platt died Wednesday of Lou Gehrig's disease at her home in Brooklyn, N.Y., according to her daughter, Antonia Bogdanovich. As a production designer, Platt was best known for creating the distinctive period sets on films directed by her former husband Peter Bogdanovich, including "The Last Picture Show" and "Paper Moon.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 2000 | GREG MILLER
Internet entertainment firm Shockwave.com said it has completed a deal in which producer and screenwriter James L. Brooks will create a series of short animations for the fledgling Web site. San Francisco-based Shockwave, launched last year by software company Macromedia Inc., said the content will be created by Brooks' Gracie Films company. Brooks, who will receive equity in Shockwave as part of the deal, is best known as executive producer of "The Simpsons" and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
James L. Brooks always follows his heart. Both what's best about his work as a writer-director ? and sections of his new "How Do You Know" are wonderful ? and what is not come from the same source: a complete faith in his personal instincts. Instincts that, inevitably, can let him down. Brooks' films include "Terms of Endearment," "Broadcast News" and "As Good as It Gets" and no one working today creates romantic comedy characters as invigorating, involving and idiosyncratic. No one has his ability to depict people as they are, people so self-aware we hold our breath in anticipation of what their next move will be in the neurotic dance of insecurity and attraction, despair and love.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1997 | SEAN MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Upstairs at Chasen's, in the Jockey Club bar where men can smoke cigars and eat chili, Jack Nicholson and James L. Brooks are doing both. Seated in an ornately brocaded booth in the late afternoon light that will soon be gone, the two Hollywood long-ball hitters lob compliments at each other through the pungent haze, jog back through the mists of fable, laugh, kid, ponder and take stock of their unordinary lives as a reporter tosses questions on the table between them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1994 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writer-director James L. Brooks' "I'll Do Anything" drew a lot of unwanted attention last summer when people recruited for a test screening said some of the musical numbers, performed by actors not known for their voices, stopped the action cold. Drastically revising his movie, Brooks took most of the music out, and audiences responded more favorably. Even so, Brooks was determined to make a musical about Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Huddled with one of his film's co-stars before shooting a big scene, James L. Brooks whispers into Albert Brooks' ear, soothing the actor with a hypnotic comic mantra. "Make it all anxiety and pain," he says softly. "It hurts. You're in pain. Intense pain. Lots of pain. Just hurt, man."
BUSINESS
January 17, 1993
I must take issue with the article in the Business section titled "At Sony Pictures, Dolgen-omics Rules" (Dec. 27). It said that I was "forced to pick up the tab, to the tune of several million dollars, earlier this year when (I) went over budget on (my) $40-million-plus musical, 'I'll Do Anything.' " The most rudimentary check would quickly reveal: I have not yet finished the film; it is budgeted at under $40 million and, with approximately three weeks left of principal photography, we are on budget.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1997
In his laudatory and welcome review of "As Good as It Gets" ("No Tricks, Just Magic," Dec. 23), Kenneth Turan leaves the clear impression that this picture was written by its director, James L. Brooks, with a co-screenwriter--Mark Andrus--from a story of Andrus'. In fact, it is a film made--brilliantly by Brooks--from an original screenplay by Andrus, a screenplay containing all of the characters, most of the situations and a preponderance of the dialogue of the final film, a screenplay that (as his then agent)
BUSINESS
May 14, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Columbia Pictures Entertainment announced Sunday that it has signed highly regarded Hollywood writer-producer-director James L. Brooks to a long-term film and television deal, luring him away from Fox Inc. In the seven-year joint venture agreement, Columbia will finance and distribute films and TV shows created by Brooks' Gracie Films.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2004 | R. Kinsey Lowe, Times Staff Writer
"Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" lifted Paramount's fortunes over the weekend, delivering an estimated $30.2 million and the studio's third No. 1 opening this year. The Paramount-Nickelodeon-DreamWorks co-production directed by Brad Silberling predictably attracted families and kids, with moviegoers 16 and younger making up 25% of the audience, parents 25% and the other 50% composed of what Paramount described as "mainstream moviegoers over 16." James L.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2000 | GREG MILLER
Internet entertainment firm Shockwave.com said it has completed a deal in which producer and screenwriter James L. Brooks will create a series of short animations for the fledgling Web site. San Francisco-based Shockwave, launched last year by software company Macromedia Inc., said the content will be created by Brooks' Gracie Films company. Brooks, who will receive equity in Shockwave as part of the deal, is best known as executive producer of "The Simpsons" and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | CLIFF ROTHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anyone expecting fireworks as the five Directors Guild of America Award nominees--two of whom were shut out of the Oscar nominations--shared a stage for a three-hour symposium Saturday morning would have been sorely disappointed. The five pros, in a mostly low-key manner, answered questions about their films and working styles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1997
In his laudatory and welcome review of "As Good as It Gets" ("No Tricks, Just Magic," Dec. 23), Kenneth Turan leaves the clear impression that this picture was written by its director, James L. Brooks, with a co-screenwriter--Mark Andrus--from a story of Andrus'. In fact, it is a film made--brilliantly by Brooks--from an original screenplay by Andrus, a screenplay containing all of the characters, most of the situations and a preponderance of the dialogue of the final film, a screenplay that (as his then agent)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1997 | SEAN MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Upstairs at Chasen's, in the Jockey Club bar where men can smoke cigars and eat chili, Jack Nicholson and James L. Brooks are doing both. Seated in an ornately brocaded booth in the late afternoon light that will soon be gone, the two Hollywood long-ball hitters lob compliments at each other through the pungent haze, jog back through the mists of fable, laugh, kid, ponder and take stock of their unordinary lives as a reporter tosses questions on the table between them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Just about the first thing anyone says to struggling actor Matt Hobbs, the center of James L. Brooks' idiosyncratic and entertaining "I'll Do Anything," is this heartfelt declaration from the woman who is briefly to be his wife: "Your feeling toward your work is one of the things I love most about you." It's an admiration that writer-director Brooks not surprisingly shares.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1991 | NEIL KOCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Koch is former West Coast editor of Channels magazine
"In the late 1940s I collaborated on a short-lived (four performances), long-forgotten revue for the Los Angeles stage called 'My L.A.' " So begins playwright-screenwriter-television writer Larry Gelbart's program notes for his Tony-winning "City of Angels," now midway through its four-month run at the Shubert and still running on Broadway where it's been for the last two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Society waited a destructively long time before it realized that movies, no less than cave paintings or 11th-Century icons, were worth preserving as part of our cultural heritage. Luckily, television was still young when the urge to preserve took effect. Even so, some of television's earliest hours are only memory. But much of it has been saved, unlike the thousands of films, both silent and sound, of which no scrap now remains. The question is, when you have preserved, what then?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1994 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writer-director James L. Brooks' "I'll Do Anything" drew a lot of unwanted attention last summer when people recruited for a test screening said some of the musical numbers, performed by actors not known for their voices, stopped the action cold. Drastically revising his movie, Brooks took most of the music out, and audiences responded more favorably. Even so, Brooks was determined to make a musical about Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The angels are definitely watching over Joely Fisher these days. Well, at least they are in her rose-colored West Los Angeles living room, which is adorned with every kind of angel imaginable. "I like the idea you can have angels," said Fisher, the 26-year-old singer-actress daughter of Connie Stevens and Eddie Fisher and half-sister of actress-author Carrie Fisher. "I think they are beautiful. I believe in a lot of crazy metaphysical stuff. But I also feel protected in a way . . .
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