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James Lawrence Powell

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NEWS
April 24, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dinosaur exhibits and a saber-toothed cat logo once drew the most attention at Los Angeles County's Natural History Museum. But recent turmoil among the staff and the appointment of a new executive director have become the focus of recent public attention. Last week, museum officials announced that James Lawrence Powell will replace Craig C. Black as head of the 80-year-old institution, effective July 1.
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NEWS
April 24, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dinosaur exhibits and a saber-toothed cat logo once drew the most attention at Los Angeles County's Natural History Museum. But recent turmoil among the staff and the appointment of a new executive director have become the focus of recent public attention. Last week, museum officials announced that James Lawrence Powell will replace Craig C. Black as head of the 80-year-old institution, effective July 1.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ending an 11-month search for a new executive director, the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History announced Wednesday that James Lawrence Powell will take over leadership of the problem-plagued museum in July. Powell, director at the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, the oldest science museum in the nation, will succeed Craig C. Blackas executive director of the county museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ending an 11-month search for a new executive director, the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History announced Wednesday that James Lawrence Powell will take over leadership of the problem-plagued museum in July. Powell, director at the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, the oldest science museum in the nation, will succeed Craig C. Blackas executive director of the county museum.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Dinosaur exhibits and a saber-toothed cat logo once drew the most attention at Los Angeles County's Natural History Museum. But recent turmoil among the staff and the appointment of a new executive director have become the focus of recent public attention. Last week, museum officials announced that James Lawrence Powell will replace Craig C. Black as head of the 80-year-old institution, effective July 1.
MAGAZINE
July 12, 1998 | Michael R. Forrest
James Lawrence Powell, president and director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, has recently written a book, "Night Comes to the Cretaceous: Dinosaur Extinction and the Transformation of Modern Geology" (W.H. Freeman and Co.). In the book, Powell explains the catastrophic and horrific extinction of the dinosaurs from a meteorite impact.
NEWS
December 11, 1998 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Craig C. Black, who directed the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County for 12 years, has died in Albuquerque, N.M., of complications following chemotherapy for lymphoma. He was 66. A Harvard-trained paleontologist who came to Los Angeles from the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Black was known as an innovative administrator who boosted donations and attendance at the 88-year-old Exposition Park museum. Black, who died Dec.
BOOKS
September 5, 1999
TODAY SHERMAN OAKS: Orson Scott Card signs "Ender's Shadow," Dangerous Visions, 13563 Ventura Blvd., 2 p.m. (818) 986-6963. WEST HOLLYWOOD: James Hillman discusses "Force of Character," Bodhi Tree Bookstore, 8585 Melrose Ave., 3 p.m. (310) 659-1733. TUESDAY BRENTWOOD: John J. Baer reads "Witness for a Generation," Dutton's Books, 11975 San Vicente Blvd., 7 p.m. (800) 286-READ. ENCINO: Robert Levinson signs "The Elvis and Marilyn Affair," Barnes & Noble, 16461 Ventura Blvd., 7:30 p.m.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Here's a statistic for you. Out of 10,855 peer-reviewed articles in scientific journals last year that dealt with some aspect of global warming, all but two accepted human behavior as the primary cause. Oddly, that represents a bit of backsliding. The previous year, only one study rejected human factors, according to an annual roundup by geochemist James Lawrence Powell and reported by Salon . Science is not a theory but a process, a mechanism for distilling truth from observation.
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