Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Leach
IN THE NEWS

James Leach

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
April 3, 1994 | Michael Ross, Michael Ross covers Congress for The Times
Not given to overstatement, Rep. James A. Leach of Iowa is the first to admit that, as scandals go, Whitewater is no Watergate. And yet by a twist of fate, Watergate was indirectly responsible for the fact that Leach now finds himself cast as President Bill Clinton's chief congressional accuser in the controversy involving a failed Arkansas thrift and its ties to a real-estate venture half owned by the Clintons.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
October 2, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Mike Leach coached Texas Tech to college football prominence, directing the nation's top passing game and soundly defeating Nebraska and Oklahoma two seasons ago. Before the Red Raiders played in a bowl game that year, he was fired. The sport has continued to peak in popularity and sink in scandal since, with Leach's tale producing his book "Swing Your Sword," which advances his contention that university friction toward paying a free-spirit football coach more than $1 million combined with accusations aired by ESPN college football analyst Craig James to force his ouster.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The San Francisco Bay Area gave Thomas Markowski and James Leach chances to succeed financially and to live openly as gay lovers. So, as both men became ill with AIDS, they decided to give something back after their deaths to the community they loved. The result is a $200,000 scholarship fund for gay and lesbian students at San Francisco State, UC Berkeley and Stanford University.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two Republicans expected to head the House and Senate Banking committees in the new Congress plan intensive investigations into the role of President Clinton in the failed Whitewater real estate venture--inquiries that could become a major headache for the White House. Aides to Rep.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
After years of plaguing the leaders of his own party, maverick Republican Rep. Jim Leach is emerging as one of President Clinton's most formidable adversaries in the Whitewater controversy. The 51-year-old Iowa lawmaker demonstrated his resolve this week by pushing ahead with plans to turn a planned House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee hearing into an inquiry into the Whitewater tangle. He is doing so despite special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr.'
NEWS
March 25, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rep. Jim Leach of Iowa, President Clinton's leading Republican critic in the Whitewater controversy, charged Thursday that the Arkansas real estate venture ultimately was used "to skim, directly or indirectly, federally insured deposits" from a Little Rock savings and loan.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days before Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's arrival for his first summit with President Bush, two Iowa congressmen have begun to organize an effort aimed at freeing up the Bush Administration's $600-million aid package for Russia and other former Soviet republics. Democratic Rep. Dave Nagle and Republican Rep. Jim Leach on Friday assembled organizations ranging from the ultra-liberal Council for a Livable World to the U.S.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
The leading Republican critic of President Clinton's involvement in the Whitewater controversy Sunday said the angry White House reaction to the appointment of a partisan Republican to investigate civil cases for the Resolution Trust Corp. was "pretty natural" and too much should not be made of it. The White House, meanwhile, spent much of the day denying allegations from Whitewater-related news reports.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two Republicans expected to head the House and Senate Banking committees in the new Congress plan intensive investigations into the role of President Clinton in the failed Whitewater real estate venture--inquiries that could become a major headache for the White House. Aides to Rep.
SPORTS
October 2, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Mike Leach coached Texas Tech to college football prominence, directing the nation's top passing game and soundly defeating Nebraska and Oklahoma two seasons ago. Before the Red Raiders played in a bowl game that year, he was fired. The sport has continued to peak in popularity and sink in scandal since, with Leach's tale producing his book "Swing Your Sword," which advances his contention that university friction toward paying a free-spirit football coach more than $1 million combined with accusations aired by ESPN college football analyst Craig James to force his ouster.
OPINION
April 3, 1994 | Michael Ross, Michael Ross covers Congress for The Times
Not given to overstatement, Rep. James A. Leach of Iowa is the first to admit that, as scandals go, Whitewater is no Watergate. And yet by a twist of fate, Watergate was indirectly responsible for the fact that Leach now finds himself cast as President Bill Clinton's chief congressional accuser in the controversy involving a failed Arkansas thrift and its ties to a real-estate venture half owned by the Clintons.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
The leading Republican critic of President Clinton's involvement in the Whitewater controversy Sunday said the angry White House reaction to the appointment of a partisan Republican to investigate civil cases for the Resolution Trust Corp. was "pretty natural" and too much should not be made of it. The White House, meanwhile, spent much of the day denying allegations from Whitewater-related news reports.
NEWS
March 25, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rep. Jim Leach of Iowa, President Clinton's leading Republican critic in the Whitewater controversy, charged Thursday that the Arkansas real estate venture ultimately was used "to skim, directly or indirectly, federally insured deposits" from a Little Rock savings and loan.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
After years of plaguing the leaders of his own party, maverick Republican Rep. Jim Leach is emerging as one of President Clinton's most formidable adversaries in the Whitewater controversy. The 51-year-old Iowa lawmaker demonstrated his resolve this week by pushing ahead with plans to turn a planned House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee hearing into an inquiry into the Whitewater tangle. He is doing so despite special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr.'
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days before Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's arrival for his first summit with President Bush, two Iowa congressmen have begun to organize an effort aimed at freeing up the Bush Administration's $600-million aid package for Russia and other former Soviet republics. Democratic Rep. Dave Nagle and Republican Rep. Jim Leach on Friday assembled organizations ranging from the ultra-liberal Council for a Livable World to the U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The San Francisco Bay Area gave Thomas Markowski and James Leach chances to succeed financially and to live openly as gay lovers. So, as both men became ill with AIDS, they decided to give something back after their deaths to the community they loved. The result is a $200,000 scholarship fund for gay and lesbian students at San Francisco State, UC Berkeley and Stanford University.
SPORTS
January 3, 1993
Organizers of this year's Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race will use computer chips instead of paint to identify dogs taking part in the 1,000-mile trek across Alaska. Tiny chips the size of a grain of rice will permit officials to use hand-held scanners to check each of the hundreds of dogs in the race and help prevent illegal attempts to substitute dogs. The chips are implanted under the back of a dog's neck using a syringe and a fat, hollow-tipped needle.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | From Times wire service s
The son of Vincennes commander Capt. Will Rogers III has been moved off campus from his Colgate University dormitory so that Navy bodyguards can protect him from possible terrorist attacks. The Vincennes was the Navy cruiser that accidentally downed an Iranian passenger jet in July. Security at the upstate New York university has been heightened in the week since a bomb exploded in a van driven by the captain's wife, Sharon Lee Rogers, in San Diego, said Colgate spokesman James Leach.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|