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James Lents

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NEWS
April 15, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL
Twenty years ago, Jim Lents was just breaking into the pollution control business. He remembers reading about Earth Day, but didn't do anything to mark the occasion. As he recalls, "I don't think there were any ceremonies in Tullahoma, Tenn." At the time, Lents was a rocket combustion expert at the University of Tennessee Space Institute. But, with the environmental movement gaining momentum, he found himself becoming more interested in emissions than missiles.
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NEWS
June 14, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's chief smog fighter is on the verge of being ousted as the regional air board failed Friday in a series of tense votes to break a deadlock over keeping him at the helm. Looking weary and dejected afterward, longtime Executive Officer James Lents said "enough is enough," adding, "my feeling is that it's over."
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NEWS
March 16, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a major reshuffling of the South Coast Air Quality Management District's top staff, Deputy Executive Officer Pat Leyden will assume broad new powers, including overall responsibility for development of a sweeping new emissions credit trading program and enforcement of smog regulations. The changes, which include the elimination of several top management positions for a savings of $500,000 a year, were ordered by Executive Officer James M. Lents and are to take effect April 6.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Ten years ago, he was the first air-quality czar to believe that the Los Angeles area would ever achieve blue skies and healthful air. He envisioned commuter ride-sharing; electric vehicles; cleaner power plants, factories and fuels; pollution-free paints; and even new formulas of charcoal lighter fluid. It was a bold and costly vision, one that could transform Southern California businesses and households, and, behind the scenes, even his own staff worried that James M.
NEWS
June 14, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's chief smog fighter is on the verge of being ousted as the regional air board failed Friday in a series of tense votes to break a deadlock over keeping him at the helm. Looking weary and dejected afterward, longtime Executive Officer James Lents said "enough is enough," adding, "my feeling is that it's over."
NEWS
February 23, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Mention smog and images of polluting cars, diesel buses and oil refineries come to mind. Mention wineries or bakeries and most people think about the bouquet of fine wine and the aroma of fresh baked bread. But, air pollution regulators say that bread and wine may have more in common with tailpipe exhaust than meets the eye. Simply put, ethanol vapors from bakeries and wineries are wafting into the atmosphere and forming ozone, the health-impairing oxidant commonly known as photochemical smog.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Ten years ago, he was the first air-quality czar to believe that the Los Angeles area would ever achieve blue skies and healthful air. He envisioned commuter ride-sharing; electric vehicles; cleaner power plants, factories and fuels; pollution-free paints; and even new formulas of charcoal lighter fluid. It was a bold and costly vision, one that could transform Southern California businesses and households, and, behind the scenes, even his own staff worried that James M.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
AQMD Gives Aerospace Firms More Time: Agreeing that the technology is not far enough advanced to allow a switch to lower-polluting substances, the South Coast Air Quality Management District decided to give aerospace companies an extra year before they must begin to use new adhesive bond primers, wire coatings, fuel tank coatings and fastener lubricative coatings.
NEWS
April 7, 1986
The South Coast Air Quality Management District board has named James Lents as acting executive officer after the announcement by Executive Officer Jeb Stuart that he would resign effective May 3. Lents, 42, who was hired in February by Stuart as his chief deputy at $72,000 a year, is among those competing for permanent appointment to Stuart's job. Before joining the district staff, Lents directed Colorado's air pollution control program.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Senate Democrats voted final rejection Thursday of Gov. Pete Wilson's appointment of Cody G. Cluff to the board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. Cluff, an entertainment industry promoter who has served on the board since Dec. 12, was denied confirmation by the Democratic-dominated body when he mustered only 14 votes, seven short of approval.
NEWS
March 16, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a major reshuffling of the South Coast Air Quality Management District's top staff, Deputy Executive Officer Pat Leyden will assume broad new powers, including overall responsibility for development of a sweeping new emissions credit trading program and enforcement of smog regulations. The changes, which include the elimination of several top management positions for a savings of $500,000 a year, were ordered by Executive Officer James M. Lents and are to take effect April 6.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL
Twenty years ago, Jim Lents was just breaking into the pollution control business. He remembers reading about Earth Day, but didn't do anything to mark the occasion. As he recalls, "I don't think there were any ceremonies in Tullahoma, Tenn." At the time, Lents was a rocket combustion expert at the University of Tennessee Space Institute. But, with the environmental movement gaining momentum, he found himself becoming more interested in emissions than missiles.
NEWS
February 23, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Mention smog and images of polluting cars, diesel buses and oil refineries come to mind. Mention wineries or bakeries and most people think about the bouquet of fine wine and the aroma of fresh baked bread. But, air pollution regulators say that bread and wine may have more in common with tailpipe exhaust than meets the eye. Simply put, ethanol vapors from bakeries and wineries are wafting into the atmosphere and forming ozone, the health-impairing oxidant commonly known as photochemical smog.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1990
In an effort to reduce downtown traffic and air pollution, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved an ordinance Tuesday that could take free parking away from about 9,000 employees in the Civic Center. Under the plan, employees will be granted a $70 monthly transportation allowance to pay for parking, bus passes or other transportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1988
The South Coast Air Quality Management District announced Wednesday that it is seeking legislation that would prohibit factories that pose "a potential public health hazard" from locating near schools, hospitals or convalescent homes. The legislation is necessitated by a Jan. 7 incident in which fumes escaped from a Glendora metal plating plant, causing 100 children at an elementary school in neighboring San Dimas to become ill, said James Lents, the air quality district's executive officer.
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