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James Luna

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"This is meat for us," says a woman on a videotape in James Luna's current exhibition, her cupped hands full of acorns. The statement is made plainly, as part of a 15-minute tape in which three generations of Native American women demonstrate the gathering, shelling, grinding and cooking of acorns to make a hot dish called "Wee-Wish."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1999 | CATHY CURTIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Youngsters reared in one of Orange County's raw, new communities of the 1950s and 1960s were surrounded by bean fields, orange groves, beaches, Disneyland and a growing commercial sprawl--a world still defining itself. Artists and musicians-to-be often found valuable mentors in their neighborhoods and endured meaningful (if sometimes painful) experiences that helped shape their later work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1999 | CATHY CURTIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Youngsters reared in one of Orange County's raw, new communities of the 1950s and 1960s were surrounded by bean fields, orange groves, beaches, Disneyland and a growing commercial sprawl--a world still defining itself. Artists and musicians-to-be often found valuable mentors in their neighborhoods and endured meaningful (if sometimes painful) experiences that helped shape their later work.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The overriding impression of James Luna that emerges from his show at Saddleback College Art Gallery (through Feb. 20) is of a genial soul who invests his art with more serious content than is immediately obvious. "Surreal, Post Indian, Subterranean Blues Experience," Luna's performance piece (shown on a videotape) features the Native American artist riding a feather-festooned stationary bicycle in front of a screen projecting moments from a '60s-era motorcycle movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The overriding impression of James Luna that emerges from his show at Saddleback College Art Gallery (through Feb. 20) is of a genial soul who invests his art with more serious content than is immediately obvious. "Surreal, Post Indian, Subterranean Blues Experience," Luna's performance piece (shown on a videotape) features the Native American artist riding a feather-festooned stationary bicycle in front of a screen projecting moments from a '60s-era motorcycle movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN
"This is meat for us," says a woman on a videotape in James Luna's current exhibition, her cupped hands full of acorns. The statement is made plainly, as part of a 15-minute tape in which three generations of Native American women demonstrate the gathering, shelling, grinding and cooking of acorns to make a hot dish called "Wee-Wish."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1991
Thank you so much for letting George Will (Column Right, Dec. 2) put into perspective the growing attack on our freedoms of expression. It isn't enough that we have to curb our free spoken expression, now the self-appointed guardians of sensitivity wish to control our visual stimuli as well. A free society can't survive if it worries too much about every transgression of some individual's personal definition of impropriety.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1996 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Wearing only a breechcloth, James Luna climbed onto the sand of a shallow display case at the San Diego Museum of Man, lay down and made art history. It was 1987. Multiculturalism was still a force on the upswing, chipping away at the stubborn exclusiveness of American history. For the viewers of "The Artifact Piece," as Luna's performance/installation was called, those stalwart myths of discovery and conquest, justice and liberty for all crumbled before their eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1996 | ART BERMAN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Native American Culture: Artists, writers, curators, scholars and activists will explore contemporary Native American cultural issues during a series of programs today through Sunday organized by the Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities. The series, free and open to the public, starts tonight at 7:30 at the Downtown Central Library with a panel discussion on "Indigenous Thought and Intellectual Work."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1985
Los Angeles police have arrested a 38-year-old Van Nuys woman and a 32-year-old man in connection with the April 28 slaying of the woman's roommate, authorities said Saturday. Maureen L. McDermott and James Flores Luna were arrested Thursday in the stabbing death of Stephen Eldridge, 27. Both suspects are being held in Van Nuys Jail without bail, said Detective Mel Arnold. Police initially thought Eldridge's death occurred during a residential robbery.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1996 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Wearing only a breechcloth, James Luna climbed onto the sand of a shallow display case at the San Diego Museum of Man, lay down and made art history. It was 1987. Multiculturalism was still a force on the upswing, chipping away at the stubborn exclusiveness of American history. For the viewers of "The Artifact Piece," as Luna's performance/installation was called, those stalwart myths of discovery and conquest, justice and liberty for all crumbled before their eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1991
Thank you so much for letting George Will (Column Right, Dec. 2) put into perspective the growing attack on our freedoms of expression. It isn't enough that we have to curb our free spoken expression, now the self-appointed guardians of sensitivity wish to control our visual stimuli as well. A free society can't survive if it worries too much about every transgression of some individual's personal definition of impropriety.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"This is meat for us," says a woman on a videotape in James Luna's current exhibition, her cupped hands full of acorns. The statement is made plainly, as part of a 15-minute tape in which three generations of Native American women demonstrate the gathering, shelling, grinding and cooking of acorns to make a hot dish called "Wee-Wish."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN
"This is meat for us," says a woman on a videotape in James Luna's current exhibition, her cupped hands full of acorns. The statement is made plainly, as part of a 15-minute tape in which three generations of Native American women demonstrate the gathering, shelling, grinding and cooking of acorns to make a hot dish called "Wee-Wish."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The "Biennial Exhibition" at New York's Whitney Museum of American Art will have a new look in 1993. The closely watched, perpetually controversial show--which attempts to define the state of contemporary art--is not known for sitting still. Each installment has a distinctive character because the artworks are selected to reflect the Zeitgeist. But next year's version of the exhibition, scheduled to open March 5, will bring substantive changes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1990 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A registered nurse convicted of hiring a co-worker to murder her roommate hired the same man seven years ago to attack another nurse so she could get the victim's job, the hired killer testified Tuesday in Van Nuys Superior Court. James Flores Luna testified that Maureen McDermott offered him money to break DeWayne Bell's arm or leg so that Bell would be forced to give up his job as a private duty nurse. McDermott said she wanted the job, Luna said.
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