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James M Cole

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NEWS
December 23, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Ethics Committee on Friday named a veteran prosecutor and defense attorney specializing in white-collar crime cases to serve as special counsel to investigate whether House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) violated federal tax laws in raising money for a college course that he taught. In announcing the appointment of James M. Cole, Rep. Nancy L. Johnson (R-Conn.
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NEWS
January 17, 1997 | JANET HOOK and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The House Ethics Committee investigation of Speaker Newt Gingrich entered its final, make-or-break phase Thursday as the panel's special counsel worked to meet a midnight deadline for filing his report and the panel prepared for nationally televised public hearings on how to punish Gingrich. Those hearings, which are expected to begin this afternoon, will offer the first detailed public discussion of the case.
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NEWS
January 16, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Idaho Rep. George V. Hansen knows the special counsel investigating House Speaker Newt Gingrich and he has passed along some blunt advice to the embattled Georgian about James M. Cole: Watch out. "I sat right across from Cole for a week during my trial," said Hansen, who served time in federal prison for breaking federal financial-disclosure laws. "I don't think he's the least bit evenhanded. His job is to find anything that's questionable, make a case out of it and get a prosecution. . .
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Idaho Rep. George V. Hansen knows the special counsel investigating House Speaker Newt Gingrich and he has passed along some blunt advice to the embattled Georgian about James M. Cole: Watch out. "I sat right across from Cole for a week during my trial," said Hansen, who served time in federal prison for breaking federal financial-disclosure laws. "I don't think he's the least bit evenhanded. His job is to find anything that's questionable, make a case out of it and get a prosecution. . .
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | JANET HOOK and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The House Ethics Committee investigation of Speaker Newt Gingrich entered its final, make-or-break phase Thursday as the panel's special counsel worked to meet a midnight deadline for filing his report and the panel prepared for nationally televised public hearings on how to punish Gingrich. Those hearings, which are expected to begin this afternoon, will offer the first detailed public discussion of the case.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House voted 229 to 170 to turn away a Democratic attempt to broaden the scope of a special counsel's investigation into Speaker Newt Gingrich's activities. The House refused to instruct its Ethics Committee to provide counsel James M. Cole with additional allegations that Gingrich (R-Ga.) used tax-exempt foundations to further his political agenda. Gingrich has previously denied using such foundations for political purposes.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The lawyer hired by the House to conduct an ethics investigation of Newt Gingrich has been subpoenaed to appear before a grand jury in connection with an intercepted telephone conversation involving Gingrich and other Republican leaders, sources said. The Justice Department has been investigating how that recording ended up in newspapers. James M. Cole, the subpoenaed lawyer, was the outside counsel for the probe. John and Alice Martin of Fort White, Fla.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Just as the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform was about to vote Eric H. Holder Jr. in contempt of Congress for failing to comply with a subpoena for documents in the flawed Fast and Furious gun-tracking case, President Obama asserted executive privilege and backed up the attorney general's position in refusing to turn over the material. The fast-moving events Wednesday morning at the White House and on Capitol Hill significantly ratcheted up a growing constitutional clash between the two branches of the federal government, one that ultimately may not be resolved until it reaches the courts.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- The former top federal prosecutor in Arizona retaliated against the lead whistle blower in the Fast and Furious controversy by leaking an internal report that suggested he too once favored “walking guns” along the Southwest border and would be accessible to U.S. criminals and drug cartels in Mexico, the Department of Justice's Inspector General's office determined Monday. Dennis K. Burke, who resigned in the wake of the Fast and Furious matter, conceded to Inspector General investigators that he leaked an internal memorandum to a television producer in which ATF Special Agent John Dodson discussed an earlier case involving gun-walking on the border.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | From Associated Press
The Internal Revenue Service is conducting an audit of the college course House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) taught for two years, officials at two Georgia colleges confirmed Tuesday. The IRS division that audits tax-exempt organizations has contacted the Kennesaw State University Foundation at Kennesaw State University and Reinhardt College. "They said the focus would be an analysis of the course," said Marsha White, spokeswoman at Reinhardt.
NEWS
December 23, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Ethics Committee on Friday named a veteran prosecutor and defense attorney specializing in white-collar crime cases to serve as special counsel to investigate whether House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) violated federal tax laws in raising money for a college course that he taught. In announcing the appointment of James M. Cole, Rep. Nancy L. Johnson (R-Conn.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. strongly defended the far-reaching probe in the disclosure of security information by the Associated Press and said American lives were jeopardized when the wire service revealed details of a foiled plot to detonate a bomb on a U.S.-bound airplane last year. “It put the American people at risk,” he said, “and that is not hyperbole. And trying to determine who is responsible for that requires aggressive action.” He added that this was one of the “top two or three most serious leaks I've ever seen.” The attorney general appointed Ronald C. Machen Jr., the U.S. attorney in Washington, D.C., to investigate the national security leak.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Pharmaceutical drug maker GlaxoSmithKline will pay $3 billion and plead guilty to federal charges to resolve a slew of criminal and civil issues stemming from its use of kickbacks, mis-branding and other misconduct to market drugs such as Paxil, Wellbutrin and Advair, the U.S. government announced. The agreement is the largest healthcare fraud settlement in history, spanning nearly every state, according to the Justice Department . It's also the largest payment ever by a drug company.
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