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James M Fail

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NEWS
July 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A man who bought 15 Texas savings and loans using only $1,000 of his own money and $70 million in loans also bought an Oklahoma bank at a good price despite failing to disclose he'd been indicted for securities fraud, the New York Times said in its Sunday editions. James M. Fail was able to buy the United Oklahoma Bank, later renamed the Oklahoma Bank, without filling out a required form, the paper said.
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BUSINESS
September 12, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former aide to President Bush told a Senate hearing Tuesday that he did nothing wrong when he helped an Arizona insurance executive acquire 15 failed Texas savings and loans and suggested that he is a victim of politics. "Until this committee began looking into this transaction, I had been very proud of that transaction and the way it had occurred," Washington lobbyist Robert J. Thompson testified before a Senate Judiciary Committee panel.
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NEWS
July 8, 1990 | From Reuters
In what congressional investigators call the worst abuse of the federal bailout program, an Arizona businessman with a history of legal problems was allowed to buy insolvent Texas savings and loans and was promised $1.85 billion in federal subsidies, a published report said. James M.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1990 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. erred when it cleared a controversial Arizona businessman to buy a failed Oklahoma bank three years ago and is investigating to see whether any wrongdoing was involved, FDIC Chairman L. William Seidman said Thursday. Seidman told the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee that he has instructed his agency's inspector general "to investigate whether it was just a mistake or something worse" when James M.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | Douglas Frantz, This article was reported by Douglas Frantz, Ronald J. Ostrow and Douglas Jehl, and written by Frantz
The FBI has launched a major investigation into allegations of political favoritism and influence peddling in connection with the government's sale to private investors of dozens of insolvent savings and loans in Texas, knowledgeable sources said Wednesday. One federal regulator said in an interview that he was offered immunity by an FBI agent in return for testimony about deals in which billion-dollar taxpayer subsidies went to "political favorites."
BUSINESS
August 1, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former federal banking regulator testified Tuesday that he had provided a well-connected Republican lobbyist with a confidential copy of an internal government report highly critical of a questionable thrift takeover that the lobbyist had helped to engineer.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of a Senate Judiciary subcommittee investigating the government's sales of failed savings and loans in late 1988 said Monday that regulators would save "millions and possibly billions of dollars" if they sought to reopen some of those deals. Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum (D-Ohio), the panel chairman, said federal regulators "couldn't possibly have known what they were doing" as they rushed to complete the selloff of troubled S&Ls in the final days of 1988.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the nation's largest and toughest law firms, noted for their aggressive tactics in takeovers and merger battles, say that they are willing to represent the federal government to help overturn controversial 1988 sales of dozens of S&Ls to private investors. The law firms would operate on a contingency basis to investigate and renegotiate the 1988 deals, which provided federal subsidies of $29 billion for buyers who were willing to purchase distressed S&Ls, Sen. Howard M.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of a Senate Judiciary subcommittee investigating the government's sales of failed savings and loans in late 1988 said Monday that regulators would save "millions and possibly billions of dollars" if they sought to reopen some of those deals. Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum (D-Ohio), the panel chairman, said federal regulators "couldn't possibly have known what they were doing" as they rushed to complete the selloff of troubled S&Ls in the final days of 1988.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1990 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. erred when it cleared a controversial Arizona businessman to buy a failed Oklahoma bank three years ago and is investigating to see whether any wrongdoing was involved, FDIC Chairman L. William Seidman said Thursday. Seidman told the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee that he has instructed his agency's inspector general "to investigate whether it was just a mistake or something worse" when James M.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | Douglas Frantz, This article was reported by Douglas Frantz, Ronald J. Ostrow and Douglas Jehl, and written by Frantz
The FBI has launched a major investigation into allegations of political favoritism and influence peddling in connection with the government's sale to private investors of dozens of insolvent savings and loans in Texas, knowledgeable sources said Wednesday. One federal regulator said in an interview that he was offered immunity by an FBI agent in return for testimony about deals in which billion-dollar taxpayer subsidies went to "political favorites."
BUSINESS
August 1, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former federal banking regulator testified Tuesday that he had provided a well-connected Republican lobbyist with a confidential copy of an internal government report highly critical of a questionable thrift takeover that the lobbyist had helped to engineer.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the nation's largest and toughest law firms, noted for their aggressive tactics in takeovers and merger battles, say that they are willing to represent the federal government to help overturn controversial 1988 sales of dozens of S&Ls to private investors. The law firms would operate on a contingency basis to investigate and renegotiate the 1988 deals, which provided federal subsidies of $29 billion for buyers who were willing to purchase distressed S&Ls, Sen. Howard M.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A man who bought 15 Texas savings and loans using only $1,000 of his own money and $70 million in loans also bought an Oklahoma bank at a good price despite failing to disclose he'd been indicted for securities fraud, the New York Times said in its Sunday editions. James M. Fail was able to buy the United Oklahoma Bank, later renamed the Oklahoma Bank, without filling out a required form, the paper said.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former aide to President Bush told a Senate hearing Tuesday that he did nothing wrong when he helped an Arizona insurance executive acquire 15 failed Texas savings and loans and suggested that he is a victim of politics. "Until this committee began looking into this transaction, I had been very proud of that transaction and the way it had occurred," Washington lobbyist Robert J. Thompson testified before a Senate Judiciary Committee panel.
SPORTS
December 16, 2008 | Mike Penner
As the losses have piled up for the Detroit Lions, fans have had to adjust their expectations. And, rather than offering discounts for a Lions victory, an oil-change business in nearby Jenison, Mich., is offering oil changes for $9 if the Lions hold a lead at any time during a game. No discounts this week. The Lions never led in a 31-21 loss to the Indianapolis Colts, dropping Detroit's record this season to 0-14.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | From Reuters
In what congressional investigators call the worst abuse of the federal bailout program, an Arizona businessman with a history of legal problems was allowed to buy insolvent Texas savings and loans and was promised $1.85 billion in federal subsidies, a published report said. James M.
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