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James M Inhofe

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NEWS
October 16, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As chairman of the centrist Democratic Leadership Council once headed by Bill Clinton, Rep. Dave McCurdy of Oklahoma has long clamored for a "New Democrat" agenda distinct from traditional liberalism. As a candidate for a Senate seat this fall, McCurdy still emphasizes some signature New Democrat ideas, such as personal responsibility, skill-training and welfare reform. But in his closely fought contest against conservative Republican Rep. James M.
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NATIONAL
May 19, 2010 | By Richard Simon and Margot Roosevelt
President Obama denounced Republicans on Tuesday for "playing special-interest politics" after a GOP senator thwarted a Democratic effort to raise the liability cap for oil spills to $10 billion. Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) was seeking the unanimous consent of the Senate to move forward on the Big Oil Bailout Prevention Act, which would retroactively boost the legal cap of $75 million on how much companies must pay for economic damages. But Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.)
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NATIONAL
May 19, 2010 | By Richard Simon and Margot Roosevelt
President Obama denounced Republicans on Tuesday for "playing special-interest politics" after a GOP senator thwarted a Democratic effort to raise the liability cap for oil spills to $10 billion. Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) was seeking the unanimous consent of the Senate to move forward on the Big Oil Bailout Prevention Act, which would retroactively boost the legal cap of $75 million on how much companies must pay for economic damages. But Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.)
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As chairman of the centrist Democratic Leadership Council once headed by Bill Clinton, Rep. Dave McCurdy of Oklahoma has long clamored for a "New Democrat" agenda distinct from traditional liberalism. As a candidate for a Senate seat this fall, McCurdy still emphasizes some signature New Democrat ideas, such as personal responsibility, skill-training and welfare reform. But in his closely fought contest against conservative Republican Rep. James M.
OPINION
October 4, 2012 | By Glen M. MacDonald
It was a long hot summer. The United States experienced the warmest July in its history, with more than 3,000 heat records broken across the country. Overall, the summer was the nation's third warmest on record and comes in a year that is turning out to be the hottest ever. High temperatures along with low precipitation generated drought conditions across 60% of the Lower 48 states, which affected 70% of the corn and soybean crop and rendered part of the Mississippi River nonnavigable.
OPINION
October 30, 2010 | Tim Rutten
If you were going to pick a single issue whose treatment exemplifies the forces at work in this midterm election, the best choice would be one over which there's been relatively little contention ? climate change. That's not because there is any broad agreement among the candidates on the severity of global warming or human activity's contribution to it. To the contrary, the question seldom has been discussed in this campaign because views on it have become utterly politicized. Skepticism about human technology's role in accelerating climate change, and doubt concerning the phenomenon's very existence, have become, at least on the Republican side, a matter of lock-step partisan orthodoxy.
OPINION
June 17, 2006
Re "EPA Rule Loosened After Oil Chief's Letter to Rove," June 13 The Environmental Protection Agency correctly interpreted the intent of Congress in the recent finalization of the rule to keep storm-water runoff clean near oil drilling sites and construction zones. Since 1987, it has been the law that uncontaminated storm-water discharges from natural gas and oil development activities, including sediment, do not require a specific wastewater permit from the EPA. However, the EPA continued to misinterpret the law, forcing Congress to act in last year's energy bill.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | From the Washington Post
Sen. Bob Smith of New Hampshire abandoned his independent campaign for the presidency Thursday, paving the way for his return to the Republican Party and a likely claim to succeed the late Sen. John H. Chafee (R-R.I.) as chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2005 | From Dow Jones/Associated Press
Three leaders in the congressional campaign to discourage Chinese oil company CNOOC Ltd.'s acquisition of Unocal Corp. accepted campaign contributions from rival suitor Chevron Corp. in recent weeks, according to reports filed with the Federal Election Commission. Rep. Richard W. Pombo (R-Tracy), Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) and Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.) have been among the most vocal on Capitol Hill in criticizing CNOOC's proposed deal as anti-competitive and a threat to national security.
NEWS
November 9, 1988
George Bush easily won Oklahoma's eight electoral votes, the sixth straight time Republicans have won the state's presidential race despite a Democratic voter registration edge of 2-to-1. Bush piled up huge margins in the heavily Republican areas of Tulsa and Oklahoma City even though the state's oil-based economy had suffered in recent years. With 71% of the precincts reporting, Bush had 478,161 votes, or 59%, to 338,606 votes, or 41%, for Democrat Michael S. Dukakis.
OPINION
August 20, 2004
Re: "Risk to State Dire in Climate Study," Aug. 17. The article was clear and frightening. On the one hand, we have the National Academy of Sciences, a MacArthur fellow and experts from Stanford, UC Berkeley, Scripps, the U.S. government forestry lab in Corvallis, Ore., (noticeably far from Washington, D.C.) and other well-regarded research institutes. On the other, we have congressmen and senators, i.e., Tom DeLay and James M. Inhofe, who regularly deny the existence of human-induced warming.
NATIONAL
August 18, 2005 | From Reuters
Fresh from visits to the Yukon in Canada and Alaska's northernmost city, four U.S. senators said Wednesday that signs of rising temperatures on Earth were obvious, and they called on Congress to act. "If you can go to the Native people and listen to their stories and walk away with any doubt that something's going on, I just think you're not listening," Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said. He was accompanied on the trip by Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.
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