Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames M Jeffords
IN THE NEWS

James M Jeffords

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Locals in Vermont refer to Republican Sen. James M. Jeffords as "Jeezum Jim," because he often stumbles into his sentences by muttering, "Aw jeez, um . . . . " But the lawmaker whose single vote could control the fate of President Bush's budget policy made his position clear Thursday after yet another negotiating round with White House officials. As the talks ended, Jeffords told Vice President Dick Cheney that they didn't have a deal.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Four of President Bush's nominations for top jobs at the Environmental Protection Agency were put on hold Wednesday by Sen. James M. Jeffords (I-Vt.), who said he was protesting the agency's refusal to provide him documents over the last three years. Jeffords said he had been "stonewalled in getting information from the EPA," and pointed to 12 unmet requests for documents between May 2001, when he left the Republican Party and became an independent, and January 2004.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
In a book detailing his path to independence, Sen. James M. Jeffords says he had many doubts and countless arguments before he abandoned the Republican Party and gave Democrats control of the Senate. His wife, Liz, "thought it was a bad idea," he writes, and so did his son Leonard. Longtime chief of staff Susan Russ also fought against the switch. But Jeffords announced his decision May 24, declaring the GOP had simply become too conservative for him.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The finale to this year's congressional debate on education reform was a bittersweet moment for the Senate's lone independent. Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont voted against the reform bill Tuesday, even though he had quit the Republican Party--and tipped the Senate into Democratic hands--partly in hopes that an education measure would emerge that he could support.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The finale to this year's congressional debate on education reform was a bittersweet moment for the Senate's lone independent. Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont voted against the reform bill Tuesday, even though he had quit the Republican Party--and tipped the Senate into Democratic hands--partly in hopes that an education measure would emerge that he could support.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont has received multiple death threats since announcing last week that he is leaving the Republican Party, a move that gives Democrats control of the Senate, an aide said Thursday. Erik Smulson, Jeffords' press secretary, said the threats had been received at the senator's offices in Washington and in Montpelier, Vt. Smulson declined to provide additional information about the threats except to say that the matter has been referred to the U.S. Capitol Police.
NEWS
May 25, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On day one of a new political reality, President Bush traveled Thursday to Ohio to promote his faith-based initiative, briefly leaving behind a soon-to-be-divided government that now threatens to derail the rest of his agenda. But the dawning of that new era, with Democrats about to take control of the Senate, clearly weighed on the president's mind. Opening a speech here to social workers, Bush said that he strongly disagreed with the decision by Sen. James M.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flexing his new authority as chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, Sen. James M. Jeffords said Wednesday he will take a second, harder look at President Bush's nominee for the Environmental Protection Agency's top enforcement job.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, crusading to sell its health care plan on Capitol Hill, won its first GOP convert Wednesday as moderate Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont agreed to sign on as a co-sponsor of the White House bill that will be submitted to Congress within a few weeks. Jeffords made his announcement as First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton testified before the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, of which he is a member.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For straying from Republican orthodoxy, they have been ostracized, berated and even punished by their conservative Senate colleagues. While promoting campaign finance reform, Susan Collins of Maine was never sure if any fellow Republicans would sit at her table during their weekly lunches. James M. Jeffords of Vermont felt their wrath while standing fast as the lone GOP sponsor of President Clinton's health care reform plan. For Maine's Olympia J.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
In a book detailing his path to independence, Sen. James M. Jeffords says he had many doubts and countless arguments before he abandoned the Republican Party and gave Democrats control of the Senate. His wife, Liz, "thought it was a bad idea," he writes, and so did his son Leonard. Longtime chief of staff Susan Russ also fought against the switch. But Jeffords announced his decision May 24, declaring the GOP had simply become too conservative for him.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flexing his new authority as chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, Sen. James M. Jeffords said Wednesday he will take a second, harder look at President Bush's nominee for the Environmental Protection Agency's top enforcement job.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont has received multiple death threats since announcing last week that he is leaving the Republican Party, a move that gives Democrats control of the Senate, an aide said Thursday. Erik Smulson, Jeffords' press secretary, said the threats had been received at the senator's offices in Washington and in Montpelier, Vt. Smulson declined to provide additional information about the threats except to say that the matter has been referred to the U.S. Capitol Police.
NEWS
May 26, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The biggest prize for the Democrats in the defection of Republican Sen. James M. Jeffords is control over the 13 major committees that set the Senate's agenda. These committees hold the keys to whether President Bush's appointees will be confirmed to federal agencies and judgeships. They determine who will testify at hearings and the content of bills that are sent to the Senate floor.
NEWS
May 25, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On day one of a new political reality, President Bush traveled Thursday to Ohio to promote his faith-based initiative, briefly leaving behind a soon-to-be-divided government that now threatens to derail the rest of his agenda. But the dawning of that new era, with Democrats about to take control of the Senate, clearly weighed on the president's mind. Opening a speech here to social workers, Bush said that he strongly disagreed with the decision by Sen. James M.
NEWS
May 25, 2001 | From Reuters
The following are excerpts from the text of a statement by Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont announcing he will leave the Republican Party to become an independent in the Senate, handing control of the U.S. upper house to the Democrats: Anyone that knows me knows I love Vermont. Vermont has always been known for its independence and social conscience. It was the first state to outlaw slavery in its constitution.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
James M. Jeffords has never mattered much to Californians. Until now. The Vermont senator's widely anticipated decision to abandon his fellow Republicans and put Democrats in control of the Senate could have big implications for California, particularly on energy and environmental policy, lawmakers and lobbyists said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a group of mid-level White House staffers convened one spring morning to choreograph President Bush's first day back after a hemispheric summit in Quebec, they had little reason to think that their guest list might lead to a profound power shift in Washington. But the exclusion of Sen. James M. Jeffords (R-Vt.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Korologos, lobbyist supreme, was wandering the Capitol building Wednesday when a Republican senator--a committee chairman--implored him to say, "Good night, Mr. Chairman," one last time. Democrats would not even allow themselves to try on such titles. "Don't jinx it," a Democratic senator whispered to his fund-raiser after she suggested that by this morning she might be calling him "Mr. Chairman."
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
James M. Jeffords has never mattered much to Californians. Until now. The Vermont senator's widely anticipated decision to abandon his fellow Republicans and put Democrats in control of the Senate could have big implications for California, particularly on energy and environmental policy, lawmakers and lobbyists said Wednesday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|