Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames M Strock
IN THE NEWS

James M Strock

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling his intention to reshape California's environmental policies, Gov. Pete Wilson named a 34-year-old federal official to head a new California Environmental Protection Agency. James M. Strock, assistant administrator for enforcement at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will take on the job of creating a state agency that will assume responsibility for such issues as toxic waste cleanup, pesticide regulation and air pollution control.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | MARLA CONE and DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After serving six years as Gov. Pete Wilson's first environmental czar, James M. Strock announced Friday that he is resigning effective June 1 and plans to pursue a career in private enterprise. Strock, who as secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency serves on Wilson's Cabinet, said he is leaving government but has no immediate job plans. To avoid potential conflicts of interest, he decided not to begin job hunting until after announcing his resignation, he said.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993
In recognition that California's economic crisis is not a Democratic or Republican one, I would like to praise the position of state Controller Gray Davis in his commentary (March 30) advocating creating a "lead agency" process for the issuance of business permits. That concept is embodied in Cal/EPA's top priority bill for 1993, SB 1185 (by Sen. Marian Bergeson, R-Newport Beach), which would create lead agency process for environmental permits and streamline the costly and burdensome process businesses have to follow now. The bill would designate a lead permit agency for environmental permits, which would then be responsible for issuing a single permit incorporating all the requirements of involved state agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1994
"Smog Plan Would Harm Economy" (Sept. 30) seriously misrepresents the Wilson Administration's recognized leadership on air quality improvement. The key to this complicated issue is that the proposed Federal Implementation Plan (FIP)--drafted by the federal EPA--is under legal authority from the 1977 Clean Air Act amendments, a law subsequently superseded by the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. In 1991, over the combined objections of the U.S. EPA and California, the Los Angeles Coalition for Clean Air convinced a federal court to compel the U.S. EPA (not California)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Wilson Administration has unveiled the first details of its plan to create a California Environmental Protection Agency, which would regulate air and water pollution, control garbage and toxic waste disposal, and evaluate threats to the environment. The proposal calls for placing a number of existing state environmental programs under a single agency, headed by a Cabinet-level secretary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1994
"Smog Plan Would Harm Economy" (Sept. 30) seriously misrepresents the Wilson Administration's recognized leadership on air quality improvement. The key to this complicated issue is that the proposed Federal Implementation Plan (FIP)--drafted by the federal EPA--is under legal authority from the 1977 Clean Air Act amendments, a law subsequently superseded by the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. In 1991, over the combined objections of the U.S. EPA and California, the Los Angeles Coalition for Clean Air convinced a federal court to compel the U.S. EPA (not California)
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | MARLA CONE and DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After serving six years as Gov. Pete Wilson's first environmental czar, James M. Strock announced Friday that he is resigning effective June 1 and plans to pursue a career in private enterprise. Strock, who as secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency serves on Wilson's Cabinet, said he is leaving government but has no immediate job plans. To avoid potential conflicts of interest, he decided not to begin job hunting until after announcing his resignation, he said.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
His walls are filled with political biographies, and he is said to have read almost everything ever published about Teddy Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, his heroes. "He looks to them for inspiration--their way of thinking and phraseology of their speeches," said an aide to James M. Strock, appointed by Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday to head the soon-to-be created California Environmental Protection Agency.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Oil Industry Wants 'Ethanol Mandate' Overturned: U.S. oil companies and refiners asked a federal court to overturn the 2-week-old rule guaranteeing corn-based ethanol a big slice of a new market for anti-smog gasoline. The American Petroleum Institute and the National Petroleum Refiners Assn., the two groups that filed the lawsuit in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, are also seeking an order preventing the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996
The political focus of "Wilson Succeeds in Easing Environmental Safeguards"(Feb. 15) might leave readers with an incomplete or even misleading impression of Gov. Pete Wilson's regulatory reform efforts. California has long combined many of the world's strictest environmental standards with an often confusing and convoluted bureaucratic process. Regulatory reform is focused on making the process simpler, faster, more enforceable and more accountable. This not only cuts economic costs, but it leads to more rapid achievement of the standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993
In recognition that California's economic crisis is not a Democratic or Republican one, I would like to praise the position of state Controller Gray Davis in his commentary (March 30) advocating creating a "lead agency" process for the issuance of business permits. That concept is embodied in Cal/EPA's top priority bill for 1993, SB 1185 (by Sen. Marian Bergeson, R-Newport Beach), which would create lead agency process for environmental permits and streamline the costly and burdensome process businesses have to follow now. The bill would designate a lead permit agency for environmental permits, which would then be responsible for issuing a single permit incorporating all the requirements of involved state agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Wilson Administration has unveiled the first details of its plan to create a California Environmental Protection Agency, which would regulate air and water pollution, control garbage and toxic waste disposal, and evaluate threats to the environment. The proposal calls for placing a number of existing state environmental programs under a single agency, headed by a Cabinet-level secretary.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
His walls are filled with political biographies, and he is said to have read almost everything ever published about Teddy Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, his heroes. "He looks to them for inspiration--their way of thinking and phraseology of their speeches," said an aide to James M. Strock, appointed by Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday to head the soon-to-be created California Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling his intention to reshape California's environmental policies, Gov. Pete Wilson named a 34-year-old federal official to head a new California Environmental Protection Agency. James M. Strock, assistant administrator for enforcement at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will take on the job of creating a state agency that will assume responsibility for such issues as toxic waste cleanup, pesticide regulation and air pollution control.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Environmental Protection Agency will fund a cost-benefit study of the state's web of environmental rules, which in recent years have come under heavy fire from business groups. The review is one of several to be undertaken by the agency, according to James M. Strock, secretary for environmental protection. Other studies will assess the five-year performance of Proposition 65, which sets toxics standards, as well as the entire state toxics regulatory program.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|