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James Macdonald

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NEWS
February 6, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Macdonald, for 40 years the Disney organization's one-man band of sound effects who also became the voice of Mickey Mouse when Walt Disney no longer had time to breathe life into his creation, has died. Macdonald blew through gas lamp chambers to emulate the roaring of bears, made galloping hoofbeats with coconut half-shells and fashioned a note on a mouth harp that sounded like an arrow hitting a target. He was 84 and died Friday at his home in Glendale of heart failure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The oak leaves overhead rustled softly. A sparrow chirped perkily from a nearby clump of pines. Distant freeway traffic made a whooshing sound resembling a restful mountain stream. James Macdonald, the connoisseur of audio effects who for 40 years helped bring Walt Disney cartoons and movies to life, would have appreciated the sounds Thursday at his funeral in Glendale.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The oak leaves overhead rustled softly. A sparrow chirped perkily from a nearby clump of pines. Distant freeway traffic made a whooshing sound resembling a restful mountain stream. James Macdonald, the connoisseur of audio effects who for 40 years helped bring Walt Disney cartoons and movies to life, would have appreciated the sounds Thursday at his funeral in Glendale.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Macdonald, for 40 years the Disney organization's one-man band of sound effects who also became the voice of Mickey Mouse when Walt Disney no longer had time to breathe life into his creation, has died. Macdonald blew through gas lamp chambers to emulate the roaring of bears, made galloping hoofbeats with coconut half-shells and fashioned a note on a mouth harp that sounded like an arrow hitting a target. He was 84 and died Friday at his home in Glendale of heart failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990
James B. MacDonald, a partner in the Costa Mesa law firm of Speers Dana Teal & Balfour, has been named to the Orange County Performing Arts Center's board of directors. MacDonald, also a partner in Mission Investments real estate developers, has been chairman of the Center's Endowment Council since 1987. He fills a vacancy on the 53-member board. His term will expire in 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1989
I have often heard people say lately that they were cutting up their Exxon cards and will never trade at an Exxon station again. That's really sad because they are not making the Exxon Corp. suffer, they are hurting the independent Exxon service station operator/owner. Exxon Corp. will sell its fuels to someone, somewhere, but the Exxon dealer who loses business can do nothing about it. The dealer did not cause the problem. Remember, the dealer is just the middleman. There are other ways to make Exxon pay. Don't punish the wrong people.
TRAVEL
November 1, 1992
I read the Tijuana article and, ever the cheapskate, headed to Mexico to buy some of the "Rogaine (or Minoxidil) selling for $6." Please tell your staff writers that when you divide the exchange rate of 3050 pesos per dollar into 183,000 pesos the result is $60, not $6. JAMES E. MACDONALD San Clemente Editor's note: The writers did, in fact, see a price of $6 U.S. for a 2-ounce bottle of Rogaine in a department store on Avenida Revolution....
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI
The Zoo District's "Nosferatu: Angel of the Final Hour" at Art Share Los Angeles isn't about vampires. Created by Kaaren J. Luker, Jon Kellam and Bernadette Sullivan and written by Luker, this production is an expressionistic exploration of the 1922 horror film classic and its director, F.W. Murnau. The melange of slapstick comedy, performance art, song and somber scenes of vampire seduction doesn't quite make a cohesive whole, yet remains fascinating.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1998 | From Reuters
Two prison companies, CCA Prison Realty and Corrections Corp. of America, announced plans Monday to merge in a $2.9-billion deal aimed at creating a prison owner with a more aggressive growth rate. CCA Prison would acquire Corrections Corp. in a stock swap with Corrections shareholders getting 0.875 share of CCA Prison common stock for each of their shares. As part of the deal, CCA would also acquire a private prison owner, U.S. Corrections Corp., for $265 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2007 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Tipped off by a former employee of a shuttered Oxnard metal recycling plant, federal investigators recently discovered more low-level radioactive material buried under concrete at the Ormond Beach site. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency workers last week found an unknown amount of thorium, a radioactive metal, under a former storage area adjacent to the now defunct Halaco Engineering Co. plant, said Rob Wise, the agency's on-site coordinator.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990
James B. MacDonald, a partner in the Costa Mesa law firm of Speers Dana Teal & Balfour, has been named to the Orange County Performing Arts Center's board of directors. MacDonald, also a partner in Mission Investments real estate developers, has been chairman of the Center's Endowment Council since 1987. He fills a vacancy on the 53-member board. His term will expire in 1993.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1987 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. filed a malpractice suit against Orange County attorney James B. Macdonald Thursday, asserting that the now-defunct Valencia Bank lost millions of dollars because of his poor legal advice. Macdonald served as general counsel to Valencia Bank between 1980 and 1985, according to the FDIC'S lawsuit, filed in Orange County Superior Court. Macdonald could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1995
A witness whose mother was killed after a death threat has been sent to jail for refusing to testify about the murder of two Compton policemen, claiming the defendant's gang friends were out to kill him, too. Judge Edward A. Ferns sent Calvin Cooksey, 33, to County Jail on Wednesday without bail until he testifies or until the end of the trial. The judge ordered Cooksey back in court Monday to take the stand again.
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