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James Macmillan

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October 9, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The Walt Disney Concert Hall organ, famous a year for being seen but not heard, has struck many who have finally heard it for the first time since its inauguration last week as a sleeping beauty or beast or hulking giant come to life. It is indeed hard, if not downright humorless, to think otherwise, so visceral are the instrument's sounds in this acoustically vibrant space.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The Walt Disney Concert Hall organ, famous a year for being seen but not heard, has struck many who have finally heard it for the first time since its inauguration last week as a sleeping beauty or beast or hulking giant come to life. It is indeed hard, if not downright humorless, to think otherwise, so visceral are the instrument's sounds in this acoustically vibrant space.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1996 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed was recently named classical music critic of The Times
You've got to see it to believe it. Not Evelyn Glennie's performance of "Veni, Veni, Emmanuel," the percussion concerto by the young Scottish composer James MacMillan that the Los Angeles Philharmonic will present during its subscription concerts this week. That you won't believe even when you do see it--for Glennie, who has been delivering riveting theatrical performances of "Veni, Veni," is a percussionist who is also deaf.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1996 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed was recently named classical music critic of The Times
You've got to see it to believe it. Not Evelyn Glennie's performance of "Veni, Veni, Emmanuel," the percussion concerto by the young Scottish composer James MacMillan that the Los Angeles Philharmonic will present during its subscription concerts this week. That you won't believe even when you do see it--for Glennie, who has been delivering riveting theatrical performances of "Veni, Veni," is a percussionist who is also deaf.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2003 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Parthenogenesis is what happens when conception occurs without a sexual act. It's a mouthful of a word, and also the title of an occasionally baffling, always ear-tingling, 51-minute dramatic "scene" by the hugely gifted Scotsman James MacMillan, who fronted the Philharmonic New Music Group at Zipper Hall on Monday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2001 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Grant Gershon and the Los Angeles Master Chorale surmounted musical challenges far more easily than the metaphysical ones they posed Saturday at First United Methodist Church in Pasadena. In only the second concert--and the first off-campus--led by the new music director, the chorale sounded honed, fresh, blended and pitch-accurate throughout a difficult, brutally exposed six-part a cappella program. The singers and conductor are still getting to know each other, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2000 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The brave, high-minded Piano Spheres series in Pasadena's woodsy Neighborhood Church completed its sixth season Friday night--and judging from its plans to commission new works and to incorporate, it intends to continue. Like any series that focuses on new music, though, the journey of discovery is often hit and miss; you're grateful for the opportunity to hear new things, if not always satisfied by the results.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1996 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A conductor-in-training cannot retire to the practice room to perfect his instrument's technique. His or her exercise with what Bruno Walter called the "dragon with 100 heads" is therefore limited, and public. So one expected a little inexperience when assistant conductor Grant Gershon--a relatively novice baton-wielder though a seasoned pianist--took the reins of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Thursday night at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. No big deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1995 | JOSEF WOODARD
An increasingly important entity in the chamber music world, Britain's Hilliard Ensemble dares to stitch together threads of traditions from medieval, post-modern and post-minimalist sources, while avoiding trivialities. As heard in the program titled "Ars Sacra: Sacred Music From Five Centuries and Six Countries" at the Irvine Barclay Theatre on Sunday afternoon, its musical identity remains one of both technical refinement and, contextually, only slight irreverence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When last we spotted Kristjan Jarvi, heir to the family conducting business, he was leading standard repertoire in the Hollywood Bowl as a Los Angeles Philharmonic assistant conductor. We knew there was another, shall we say, looser side to Jarvi, but not until Saturday night, with the L.A. debut of his Absolute Ensemble in the Skirball Center's Magnin Auditorium, did we know just how far off the path he likes to stray.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1995 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An increasingly important entity in the chamber music world, Britain's Hilliard Ensemble dares to stitch together threads of traditions from medieval, postmodern and post-minimalist sources, while avoiding trivialities. As heard in the program titled "Ars Sacra: Sacred Music From Five Centuries and Six Countries," at the Irvine Barclay Theatre on Sunday afternoon, its musical identity remains one of both technical refinement and, contextually, only slight irreverence.
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