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James Marsters

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009
A memorial will be held for James C. Marsters, a Pasadena orthodontist who co-developed a teletypewriter that opened up phone use for the deaf, at 1 p.m. Oct. 25 at St. Clement's Episcopal Church, 2837 Claremont Blvd., Berkeley. Marsters, 85, died July 28 in Oakland.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009
A memorial will be held for James C. Marsters, a Pasadena orthodontist who co-developed a teletypewriter that opened up phone use for the deaf, at 1 p.m. Oct. 25 at St. Clement's Episcopal Church, 2837 Claremont Blvd., Berkeley. Marsters, 85, died July 28 in Oakland.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
James C. Marsters, a Pasadena orthodontist who with two other deaf men co-developed a teletypewriter in the 1960s that opened up phone use -- and the wider world -- to the deaf, has died. He was 85. Marsters, who was the last survivor of the trio of innovators, died July 28 at his home in Oakland after a short illness, said his daughter, Jean. With a physicist and an engineer-businessman, Marsters helped create a modem in 1964 that linked a teletypewriter to traditional phone lines and converted audio tones into typed messages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
James C. Marsters, a Pasadena orthodontist who with two other deaf men co-developed a teletypewriter in the 1960s that opened up phone use -- and the wider world -- to the deaf, has died. He was 85. Marsters, who was the last survivor of the trio of innovators, died July 28 at his home in Oakland after a short illness, said his daughter, Jean. With a physicist and an engineer-businessman, Marsters helped create a modem in 1964 that linked a teletypewriter to traditional phone lines and converted audio tones into typed messages.
NEWS
July 26, 2007 | Michael Flaherty
The singing, dancing, acting Oklahoma native's resume is a study in sound judgment: "Superman Returns," "X-Men," "The Notebook," "Ally McBeal," "Saved by the Bell: The New Class." (You think we're kidding.) Marsden, 33, chatted with The Times about his new film, "Hairspray," mistaken identity and Internet myths. I was a huge fan of your work on "Buffy, the Vampire Slayer." I wasn't on "Buffy." You're thinking of James Marsters .... I'm just breaking your chops.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2000
* Art. "The Work of Charles and Ray Eames: A Legacy of Invention," an exhibit of furniture, art, film and other creations by the husband-and-wife designers, closes Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 857-6000. * Theater. The Fabulous Monsters' take on "Hedda Gabler," "Speed-Hedda," closes Sunday at Evidence Room, 2220 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. Today-Sunday, 8 p.m. $15-$20. (213) 381-7118. * Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2008 | Robert Lloyd
SEX and science fiction go together like dilithium crystals and warp drives. But "Torchwood," returning this week for a second season on BBC America, makes a point of it: The universe runs on desire. A sci-fi soap opera about talented outside-the-government investigators policing a space-time rift -- in Cardiff, Wales, as good a place as any -- it belongs to the same fictional universe as creator Russell T.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2003 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
It must be said that the singer of local band Ghost of the Robot is James Marsters, who plays peroxided vampire Spike on TV's cult hit "Buffy the Vampire Slayer." But the quintet proved more than a vanity vehicle during its Knitting Factory debut Saturday. "Buffy" has featured a wide array of musical acts, from L.A. indie-poppers Four Star Mary to singer-songwriter Aimee Mann.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
A reunion of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," a tribute to writer-producer Judd Apatow and salutes to several first-year series highlight the 25th annual William S. Paley Television Festival being announced today. Organized by the Paley Center for Media, the festival will be held for the first time this year at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood instead of the center's Beverly Hills facility. It runs March 14-27.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1999 | JAMES E. FOWLER
Ron Lawrence will be the featured poet at Barnes & Noble's monthly poetry reading Saturday in Encino. Open-mike readings start at 7:30 p.m., followed by Lawrence at 8 p.m. 16461 Ventura Blvd. (818) 380-1636. Exile Books and Music, 14925 Magnolia Blvd., Sherman Oaks, has Nelson Gary signing and reading excerpts from his book "A Wonderful Life in Our Lives." There will be poetry readings by Gary, Steve Abee and Lynda Lou Bouch starting at 8 p.m. Friday. $5 cover.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2000 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid endless debate over the proliferating horror of school shootings, one perspective in short supply is that of the most impacted demographic--teenagers. The Blank Theatre Company compensates for some of that neglect with an all-professional staging of 19-year-old Victor Kaufold's "The Why" at the Hudson Mainstage Theatre. A finalist in the Blank Theatre's Young Playwrights Festival, Kaufold's play articulately explores this urgent issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2003 | Virginia Tyson, Times Staff Writer
Last season was a dark time in the Buffyverse. First, over on UPN, "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" ended its seven-season run as Buffy and her pals in Sunnydale waged war -- and won -- against the First Evil and his minions. Meanwhile, on the WB's spinoff series, "Angel," Los Angeles was plunged into permanent midnight by the Beast, the servant of an emotionally needy demon with a big appetite.
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