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James Martin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2013 | Times staff and wire reports
British futurist James Martin, who predicted the ubiquity of computers and foretold the rise of the Internet in "The Wired Society," a 1978 book that was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, has died near his private island in Bermuda. He was 79. Authorities in the British territory said Thursday that an autopsy is pending for Martin, whose body was found by a kayaker in waters near the author's home. Police have said they do not believe a crime is involved. While on sabbatical from IBM in 1977, Martin made his first million dollars traveling the world and lecturing business executives on the coming computer revolution.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2013 | Times staff and wire reports
British futurist James Martin, who predicted the ubiquity of computers and foretold the rise of the Internet in "The Wired Society," a 1978 book that was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, has died near his private island in Bermuda. He was 79. Authorities in the British territory said Thursday that an autopsy is pending for Martin, whose body was found by a kayaker in waters near the author's home. Police have said they do not believe a crime is involved. While on sabbatical from IBM in 1977, Martin made his first million dollars traveling the world and lecturing business executives on the coming computer revolution.
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BUSINESS
February 1, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Former Deputy Commissioner James Martin, the highest-ranking police officer convicted in the ongoing federal probe of police corruption in this city, has died of cancer. His death Jan. 25 at 54 came less than a week after a government-appointed doctor said Martin had cancer and would probably not survive the 18-month prison term to which he had been sentenced. Martin was among more than two dozen officers convicted in the wide-ranging federal probe.
OPINION
February 22, 2006 | On the Web For more letters see www.latimes.com/letters.
Re "Rescuers Hear Only Silence From Sea of Mud," Feb. 19 The reporting of the mudslide disaster in the Philippines fails to address the causes of this catastrophe and seems to treat it as an act of God, thus absolving people of any responsibility. Failure to recognize and correct the human involvement in this tragedy will just lead to thousands more deaths in the future. In 2001, a team of scientists from Humboldt University of Berlin reported that forest cover on Leyte Island had decreased markedly since the late 1980s because of illegal logging with the support of government officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1994 | JULIE FIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A jury in Santa Barbara has recommended that a former Ventura man should spend the rest of his life in prison without the possibility of parole for the execution-style murder of a Canadian tourist two years ago. Prosecutors had argued that James Lindsey Martin, 40, should receive the death penalty for the October, 1991, murder of Evelyn Marie Hendrix, 68, of Qualicum Beach, British Columbia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1993
While we're in the midst of hearing all sides of the issue on gays in the military, let's not forget us heterosexuals who find the military way of life disgusting and unnatural. For our sakes, don't allow open gays to be in the military. When the draft gets revived--and it eventually will be--claiming to be gay will be one of the few ways we have of being turned down by that dehumanizing organization. JAMES MARTIN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1996
Two tourists who were struck and killed by a car that careened onto a Marina del Rey sidewalk were identified Tuesday as a couple from Scotland who were only hours away from their flight back home. James Martin, 62, and his wife, Margaret Martin, 59, of Glasgow, were walking north on Via Marina near Washington Boulevard about 3:30 p.m. Monday when a car driven by 79-year-old Fred C. Alexander of Marina del Rey abruptly swerved onto the sidewalk, sheared off a fire hydrant and struck the couple.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987
Enough already on "Fatal Attraction." I saw it and liked it. But I had no idea it was to be the platform by which we would escalate the battle of the sexes. You feminists are really something. I suppose you would have been there to crucify Anne Bancroft's character in "The Graduate" (sleeping with her daughter's boyfriend, remember?). Alex in "Fatal Attraction" was one sick woman, and if that's the kind you rally around, then your cause is in critical shape. A bit of advice: Uncomplicate your lives and tone down your rhetoric.
OPINION
February 22, 2006 | On the Web For more letters see www.latimes.com/letters.
Re "Rescuers Hear Only Silence From Sea of Mud," Feb. 19 The reporting of the mudslide disaster in the Philippines fails to address the causes of this catastrophe and seems to treat it as an act of God, thus absolving people of any responsibility. Failure to recognize and correct the human involvement in this tragedy will just lead to thousands more deaths in the future. In 2001, a team of scientists from Humboldt University of Berlin reported that forest cover on Leyte Island had decreased markedly since the late 1980s because of illegal logging with the support of government officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1990
A Southeast San Diego man pleaded guilty Thursday to voluntary manslaughter in the death of James Otis Leggett, who was shot in the mouth but died of meningitis one month later. James Martin, 55, pleaded guilty at a readiness conference before Superior Court Judge William Mudd, who set sentencing for Sept. 20. Martin shot Leggett on Dec. 1 near his house on Hensley Street after Martin brought his gun outside after hearing gunshots. Leggett, 39, was shot in the back of his mouth.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
The brick-walled, high-ceilinged stage of the Ivy Substation is just a few steps from Culver City, which calls itself "the heart of screenland" -- "a delicious irony," notes Mitchell Gossett. Bottom's Dream, the theater company that is run by Gossett and James Martin, operates on an aesthetic that is far removed from that of "screenland."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2002 | From the Washington Post
James Martin Jr., a NASA engineer who in the 1970s was project manager of the unmanned space missions to Mars known as Viking 1 and 2, the first U.S. expeditions to land safely on another planet, has died. He was 81. Martin died April 14 of cancer at a son's home in Crofton, Md. Martin, an aerospace engineer, joined NASA's Langley Research Center in 1964 as assistant project manager for the Lunar Orbiter Project.
BOOKS
February 28, 1999 | JEFFERY PAINE, Jeffery Paine is a contributing editor of the Wilson Quarterly and a visiting fellow at the East-West Center. His book, "Father India," was published in November
There is a way for you to participate in the history described here. Read this review in your pajamas while sipping a cup of Indian tea, preferably on the veranda of a bungalow. Some random Indian words that strayed into the English language--for instance, bungalow, veranda, pajamas--are the last living vestiges of the once almighty British Raj. Language also tells us something about the fate of British India.
SPORTS
October 10, 1998
Further proof that sports is the toy department of life: The toy department: In a lifetime spent rooting against the Dodgers, few players have irritated me more than Darryl Strawberry. While I always admired his skills, his style of play is maddening if you're pulling for the other team. And off the field, his attitude has led him to take public positions that I find truly annoying. The life department: Within seconds after reading that Darryl has cancer, I found myself one of his biggest supporters in the game of life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1998
Simi Valley resident James Francis Martin died Wednesday after a lengthy illness. He was 55. Martin was born July 25, 1943, in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved with his family to Van Nuys in 1944. He attended Van Nuys High School and served in the U.S. Navy from 1962 to 1964. Martin met his wife, Carol, through a mutual friend and the couple were married June 20, 1967. They lived in the Van Nuys area for a year before moving to Canoga Park.
SPORTS
October 10, 1998
Further proof that sports is the toy department of life: The toy department: In a lifetime spent rooting against the Dodgers, few players have irritated me more than Darryl Strawberry. While I always admired his skills, his style of play is maddening if you're pulling for the other team. And off the field, his attitude has led him to take public positions that I find truly annoying. The life department: Within seconds after reading that Darryl has cancer, I found myself one of his biggest supporters in the game of life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1985 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
Cradling a bouquet of roses, a joyous Patti Frustaci left St. Joseph Hospital Wednesday, her five surviving septuplets remaining behind, to continue recuperating at her parents' home in Orange. "We You Mom and Dad, From Patti, James, Stephen, Bonnie and Richard," proclaimed a thin, vertical banner lowered from a fifth-floor window of adjacent Childrens Hospital of Orange County, where the five 9-day-old Frustaci infants are in critical but stable condition in the neonatal intensive care unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1996
Two tourists who were struck and killed by a car that careened onto a Marina del Rey sidewalk were identified Tuesday as a couple from Scotland who were only hours away from their flight back home. James Martin, 62, and his wife, Margaret Martin, 59, of Glasgow, were walking north on Via Marina near Washington Boulevard about 3:30 p.m. Monday when a car driven by 79-year-old Fred C. Alexander of Marina del Rey abruptly swerved onto the sidewalk, sheared off a fire hydrant and struck the couple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1994 | JULIE FIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A jury in Santa Barbara has recommended that a former Ventura man should spend the rest of his life in prison without the possibility of parole for the execution-style murder of a Canadian tourist two years ago. Prosecutors had argued that James Lindsey Martin, 40, should receive the death penalty for the October, 1991, murder of Evelyn Marie Hendrix, 68, of Qualicum Beach, British Columbia.
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