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James Mcbride

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2003 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Some melodies just dog you, harangue you even in your sleep. James McBride knows what that's all about. Consequently, he's had little rest in the last few weeks. Long traveling days. Even longer working nights. A host of gritty-eyed mornings. All the while he's chased by a theme or many pieces of them -- living the musician's life. Or sort of.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On Wednesday night, the National Book Awards were presented at a black-tie dinner at Cipriani Wall Street in Manhattan. “The Oscars of the Book World,” host Mika Brzezinski called it, although, as Fran Lebowitz once sniffed, “It's the Oscars without money.” Brzezinski and Lebowitz represent what we might call the two opposing poles of the National Book Awards: celebrity and literature. Over the last decade or so - since a celebrated dust-up over the 2004 fiction finalists, only one of which had sold more than 2,000 copies - the National Book Foundation, which administers the prizes, has made a concerted effort to make them more high profile, more accessible, more fun. Don't get me wrong: I'm not suggesting that this has dumbed down the National Book Awards; just the contrary, in fact.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
John Brown, the white abolitionist who sought to free black slaves with the barrel of a gun, is a recurring character in American literature. He's one of the ghosts that haunt Marilynne Robinson's "Gilead," and he's the messianic, brooding prophet at the heart of Russell Banks' epic "Cloudsplitter. " In the post-Civil War memoir of his contemporary, Frederick Douglass, Brown is a brave, principled man, with a plan to start a slave uprising that's plainly suicidal. In James McBride's new novel, "The Good Lord Bird," Brown is a comic figure, given to making religious speeches at strangely inappropriate moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
James McBride won the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction for “The Good Lord Bird,” a satirical account of pre-Civil War America that features a cross-dressing slave who gets caught up in John Brown's famous anti-slavery rebellion. The finalists in the fiction category included Rachel Kushner for “The Flamethrowers,” Jhumpa Lahiri for “The Lowland,” George Saunders for “Tenth of December," and the famously reclusive Thomas Pynchon, for the novel “Bleeding Edge.” As expected, Pynchon declined to attend the ceremony.
BOOKS
January 31, 1999
Brian Hayes, purchasing coordinator: "My Dark Places" by James Ellroy (Alfred A. Knopf). "Perhaps the only thing more brutal than his mother's murder is Ellroy's self-deprecating honesty. I was mesmerized by his narrative, a real gut-grinder that never lets go, leaving a permanent scar on your memory." **** Haimanot Habtu, attorney: "The Color of Water" by James McBride (Riverhead).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On Wednesday night, the National Book Awards were presented at a black-tie dinner at Cipriani Wall Street in Manhattan. “The Oscars of the Book World,” host Mika Brzezinski called it, although, as Fran Lebowitz once sniffed, “It's the Oscars without money.” Brzezinski and Lebowitz represent what we might call the two opposing poles of the National Book Awards: celebrity and literature. Over the last decade or so - since a celebrated dust-up over the 2004 fiction finalists, only one of which had sold more than 2,000 copies - the National Book Foundation, which administers the prizes, has made a concerted effort to make them more high profile, more accessible, more fun. Don't get me wrong: I'm not suggesting that this has dumbed down the National Book Awards; just the contrary, in fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I never got to one of the most anticipated panels at Sunday's eighth Brooklyn Book Festival : A conversation between legendary comics artists Art Spiegelman and Jules Feiffer. It wasn't for lack of interest; there was just too much to do. At the same time as Spiegelman and Feiffer were doing their thing, after all, I was moderating a conversation between novelists Meg Wolitzer (“The Interestings”), Audrey Niffenegger (“The Time Traveler's Wife”) and James McBride (“The Good Lord Bird”)
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By David L. Ulin
So what about that National Book Awards fiction longlist? It's a good one, and the last of the four longlists to be released by the National Book Foundation this week. The list includes one of my favorite novels of 2013, “The Flamethrowers” by Rachel Kushner, and Tom Drury's fifth novel, “Pacific,” which deals in part with a 14-year-old's experiences in Southern California. Also cited are George Saunders' elegant and heartbreaking short-story collection, “Tenth of December,” which came out at the beginning of the year, as well as two of the most anticipated novels of the fall: “The Lowland” by Jhumpa Lahiri and Thomas Pynchon's “Bleeding Edge.” Pynchon, of course, is a former National Book Award winner; he received the 1974 prize for his landmark novel “Gravity's Rainbow.” So too is Alice McDermott, who won a 1988 National Book Award for “Charming Billy.” Her new novel, “Someone,” also made the longlist this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
James McBride won the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction for “The Good Lord Bird,” a satirical account of pre-Civil War America that features a cross-dressing slave who gets caught up in John Brown's famous anti-slavery rebellion. The finalists in the fiction category included Rachel Kushner for “The Flamethrowers,” Jhumpa Lahiri for “The Lowland,” George Saunders for “Tenth of December," and the famously reclusive Thomas Pynchon, for the novel “Bleeding Edge.” As expected, Pynchon declined to attend the ceremony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1985
School Board Forum Slated: The five candidates running for two vacant seats on the Tustin Unified School District Board are scheduled to appear at a public forum at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30 in the City Council chambers, 300 Centennial Way. The forum, sponsored by the Tustin branch of the American Assn. of University Women, offers school board candidates the opportunity to present position statements and field questions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I never got to one of the most anticipated panels at Sunday's eighth Brooklyn Book Festival : A conversation between legendary comics artists Art Spiegelman and Jules Feiffer. It wasn't for lack of interest; there was just too much to do. At the same time as Spiegelman and Feiffer were doing their thing, after all, I was moderating a conversation between novelists Meg Wolitzer (“The Interestings”), Audrey Niffenegger (“The Time Traveler's Wife”) and James McBride (“The Good Lord Bird”)
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By David L. Ulin
So what about that National Book Awards fiction longlist? It's a good one, and the last of the four longlists to be released by the National Book Foundation this week. The list includes one of my favorite novels of 2013, “The Flamethrowers” by Rachel Kushner, and Tom Drury's fifth novel, “Pacific,” which deals in part with a 14-year-old's experiences in Southern California. Also cited are George Saunders' elegant and heartbreaking short-story collection, “Tenth of December,” which came out at the beginning of the year, as well as two of the most anticipated novels of the fall: “The Lowland” by Jhumpa Lahiri and Thomas Pynchon's “Bleeding Edge.” Pynchon, of course, is a former National Book Award winner; he received the 1974 prize for his landmark novel “Gravity's Rainbow.” So too is Alice McDermott, who won a 1988 National Book Award for “Charming Billy.” Her new novel, “Someone,” also made the longlist this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
John Brown, the white abolitionist who sought to free black slaves with the barrel of a gun, is a recurring character in American literature. He's one of the ghosts that haunt Marilynne Robinson's "Gilead," and he's the messianic, brooding prophet at the heart of Russell Banks' epic "Cloudsplitter. " In the post-Civil War memoir of his contemporary, Frederick Douglass, Brown is a brave, principled man, with a plan to start a slave uprising that's plainly suicidal. In James McBride's new novel, "The Good Lord Bird," Brown is a comic figure, given to making religious speeches at strangely inappropriate moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2003 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Some melodies just dog you, harangue you even in your sleep. James McBride knows what that's all about. Consequently, he's had little rest in the last few weeks. Long traveling days. Even longer working nights. A host of gritty-eyed mornings. All the while he's chased by a theme or many pieces of them -- living the musician's life. Or sort of.
BOOKS
January 31, 1999
Brian Hayes, purchasing coordinator: "My Dark Places" by James Ellroy (Alfred A. Knopf). "Perhaps the only thing more brutal than his mother's murder is Ellroy's self-deprecating honesty. I was mesmerized by his narrative, a real gut-grinder that never lets go, leaving a permanent scar on your memory." **** Haimanot Habtu, attorney: "The Color of Water" by James McBride (Riverhead).
BUSINESS
July 15, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Verizon Communications Inc. has failed to persuade a judge to dismiss most of a $4-billion lawsuit by NorthPoint Communications Group Inc. that accuses the largest U.S. local-telephone company of unfairly abandoning a takeover. A Santa Clara County Superior Court judge rejected Verizon's bid to throw out claims of fraud and punitive damages totaling as much as $3 billion.
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