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James Mcdaniel

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1997 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far from the mean streets of New York, James McDaniel, who plays Lt. Arthur Fancy, the no-nonsense head of detectives on "NYPD Blue," was footloose and apparently Fancy-free. Instead of the somber, edgy demeanor of Fancy, McDaniel was howling with laughter as he performed impressions of actors he had seen the night before in a movie. His infectious loud laugh could be heard a block away.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010
SERIES Barney & Friends: The purple dinosaur and his gang return for a new season (9:30 a.m. KLCS). 30 for 30: The new documentary "Four Days of October" documents the Boston Red Sox dramatic comeback against the New York Yankees which, they claim, brought the "Curse of the Bambino" to a glorious close (5 p.m. ESPN; 8 p.m. ESPN2). Making History: This new series follows three filmmakers as they bring people, places and things from the past back to life in film. In the opener, "Hitler," they restage key moments from the Nazi leader's life (6 and 9 p.m. National Geographic)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1990 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neighbors who knew Gregory Allan Sturm when he was growing up in the rocky hills of the De Anza area outside Riverside remember an energetic, playful youth who loved to swim and often baby-sat younger neighborhood children. But at some point, they say without quite being able to pinpoint it, that youthful energy became misdirected and was a source of friction among family and neighbors.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2000 | SUSAN KARLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While actors directing their cast mates is the rage in television these days, producer Steven Bochco has had a long-standing policy that actors on his series--from current shows "NYPD Blue" on ABC and CBS' "City of Angels" as well as his earlier shows such as "Hill Street Blues" and "L.A. Law"--could not direct episodes while still part of the casts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010
SERIES Barney & Friends: The purple dinosaur and his gang return for a new season (9:30 a.m. KLCS). 30 for 30: The new documentary "Four Days of October" documents the Boston Red Sox dramatic comeback against the New York Yankees which, they claim, brought the "Curse of the Bambino" to a glorious close (5 p.m. ESPN; 8 p.m. ESPN2). Making History: This new series follows three filmmakers as they bring people, places and things from the past back to life in film. In the opener, "Hitler," they restage key moments from the Nazi leader's life (6 and 9 p.m. National Geographic)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2000 | SUSAN KARLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While actors directing their cast mates is the rage in television these days, producer Steven Bochco has had a long-standing policy that actors on his series--from current shows "NYPD Blue" on ABC and CBS' "City of Angels" as well as his earlier shows such as "Hill Street Blues" and "L.A. Law"--could not direct episodes while still part of the casts.
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many African American actors, the goal has long been to get roles in which skin color has no bearing on casting, as well as to get parts that illustrate the diversity, richness and heritage of their race. But that has rarely been the case. Three actors--whose powerful performances in dramatic series are changing the landscape of TV--talk about what those roles mean to them as they return to three of the most popular and acclaimed ensemble shows on TV.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | PATRICK PACHECO
Anecdotes are the meat of any dinner party, and, in the fall of 1983, New Yorkers were feasting on a juicy story about a charming young black man who managed to win the confidence of certain prominent New Yorkers by posing as the son of Sidney Poitier. On successive nights, "David Poitier" duped two couples by claiming to be a college friend of their children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2001
I have read William Lobdell's article regarding the beautiful, kind, thoughtful work that the young Catholic Boy Scout from Brea, James McDaniel, has done for the graves of the Jewish veterans ("A Scout's Good Turn for Jewish Veterans," May 24). As a Navy vet of the Korean War era and also being Jewish, I found it very heartwarming. I may speak for the thousands of Jewish vets here in Southern California who also thank the young man for his sincere effort. Please have Lobdell call the McDaniel family in Brea and thank them for having raised a great kid. With such young men such as James, America's future is in good hands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001
Re "A Boy Scout's Deeds Draws Responses," Letters, June 3: Patricia A. Crowell's letter should make for a great Scouting project: digging up Jewish vets' graves and testing for homosexuality: Wouldn't want the Star of David to accidentally land on one of those. Of course, I don't mean this. Where do folks like Pat get these ideas? As a Scoutmaster, it fascinates me that Scouts go out of their way to "do a good turn" for so many less fortunate people in our society. James McDaniel, far from the exception in Scouting, is doing a gentle and kind thing for veterans who happen to be of Jewish descent.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1997 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far from the mean streets of New York, James McDaniel, who plays Lt. Arthur Fancy, the no-nonsense head of detectives on "NYPD Blue," was footloose and apparently Fancy-free. Instead of the somber, edgy demeanor of Fancy, McDaniel was howling with laughter as he performed impressions of actors he had seen the night before in a movie. His infectious loud laugh could be heard a block away.
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many African American actors, the goal has long been to get roles in which skin color has no bearing on casting, as well as to get parts that illustrate the diversity, richness and heritage of their race. But that has rarely been the case. Three actors--whose powerful performances in dramatic series are changing the landscape of TV--talk about what those roles mean to them as they return to three of the most popular and acclaimed ensemble shows on TV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1990 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neighbors who knew Gregory Allan Sturm when he was growing up in the rocky hills of the De Anza area outside Riverside remember an energetic, playful youth who loved to swim and often baby-sat younger neighborhood children. But at some point, they say without quite being able to pinpoint it, that youthful energy became misdirected and was a source of friction among family and neighbors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | PATRICK PACHECO
Anecdotes are the meat of any dinner party, and, in the fall of 1983, New Yorkers were feasting on a juicy story about a charming young black man who managed to win the confidence of certain prominent New Yorkers by posing as the son of Sidney Poitier. On successive nights, "David Poitier" duped two couples by claiming to be a college friend of their children.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
How broad is the 1st Amendment? Broad enough to protect expression that abets or leads to murder? That is at the heart of "Deliberate Intent," the kind of taut, smart, provocative, nonfiction legal story you'd expect from high-achieving HBO or Showtime instead of the Fox-owned FX network.
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