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James Mcdougal

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NEWS
May 20, 1997 | Reuters
A federal judge on Monday denied a request by James B. McDougal, President Clinton's former Whitewater partner, to remain free while he appeals convictions on fraud and conspiracy charges. Whitewater prosecutors had agreed not to oppose McDougal's request, but U.S. District Judge George Howard turned it down, saying he was not convinced the appeal would result in a reversal of the convictions or a new trial. "The motion for bond pending appeal has been denied," Howard said in his ruling.
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NEWS
March 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
Repeatedly stating "I don't recall" and "I don't remember," Susan McDougal testified Thursday that she had forgotten what little she knew in the 1980s about the fraudulent land deals at the heart of the Whitewater investigation. In her second day under cross-examination by one of independent counsel Kenneth W.
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OPINION
March 15, 1998
Re "Whitewater Witness James McDougal Dies," March 9: In death, James McDougal has provided the American people with a greater service than he could ever perform in life. McDougal was a convicted thief; he swindled millions from the government and was an admitted liar (either he lied to protect the president, or more probably, he lied to get a reduced sentence after he was convicted). Now his death has prompted Kenneth Starr to describe McDougal as a "true Southern gentleman." Thank you, James McDougal, for showing us what Starr really thinks of us. Susan McDougal refused to lie for Starr and went to jail; the "gentleman" faced 85 years in jail for his crimes, but probably would have spent less time in jail than his ex-wife, for saying what Starr wanted to hear.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking her 2 1/2-year silence on Whitewater, an emotional Susan McDougal finally answered questions Tuesday about a series of Byzantine land deals here in the 1980s, telling a jury that President Clinton had been truthful about his involvement. As the 44-year-old McDougal took the witness stand in her own defense in the third week of her contempt trial, her lawyer wasted no time in asking her some of the questions posed to her by independent counsel Kenneth W.
NEWS
May 4, 1996 | From Associated Press
Prosecutors rested their case against Gov. Jim Guy Tucker and President Clinton's former business partners Friday without showing how Clinton benefited from a $300,000 loan, as another witness had claimed. David Hale, the Whitewater prosecutor's chief witness, testified a month ago that James B. McDougal and Clinton benefited from the loan, which was made in the name of an advertising business operated by McDougal's then-wife, Susan.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's investigators alleged for the first time Thursday that a fraudulent loan to Susan McDougal in the 1980s was used to retire a $27,600 debt in President Clinton's name that was taken out for their Whitewater land venture.
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | Associated Press
Investigators are trying to learn if a missing file on a former business associate of President Clinton was taken from the office of a White House aide after he committed suicide, it was reported today. The federal investigators have been told that Vincent Foster Jr. kept a file in his office on James McDougal and Whitewater Development Corp., McDougal's real estate investment firm, the New York Times reported. Foster committed suicide on July 20.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | SARA FRITZ and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
She is the mystery woman of the Whitewater saga--the one key witness who has as yet said nothing publicly about President Clinton's Ozark Mountain land investment. Susan McDougal, 38-year-old former wife of failed savings and loan owner James B. McDougal and former partner with the Clintons in the Whitewater Development Corp., is in a position to know about many unexplained aspects of the controversy now engulfing the White House.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While testimony in the Susan McDougal embezzlement trial focuses on the dry details of canceled checks and 6-year-old credit card receipts, a far more entertaining sideshow over matters of decorum continues between the scolding judge and the voluble defendant. As far as Superior Court Judge Leslie W. Light is concerned, he rules Department M in Santa Monica. "This courtroom is not being run by the defendant in any way, shape or form whatsoever," he said sternly on Monday.
NEWS
May 29, 1996 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sweeping verdict that will intensify the Whitewater controversy as the November election draws near, a jury on Tuesday convicted President Clinton's two investment partners, James B. McDougal, his former wife Susan McDougal and Arkansas Gov. Jim Guy Tucker, of participating in a $3-million conspiracy to defraud two federally backed financial institutions. The convictions provided a victory for embattled independent counsel Kenneth W.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's investigators alleged for the first time Thursday that a fraudulent loan to Susan McDougal in the 1980s was used to retire a $27,600 debt in President Clinton's name that was taken out for their Whitewater land venture.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors told jurors on Wednesday that Whitewater figure Susan McDougal has withheld key information that might help them determine whether President Clinton lied in court about his financial connections to a failed savings and loan in the 1980s. But the attorney for the 44-year-old McDougal, now facing a second stint in prison for contempt of court, said she would love to tell everything she knows about the complex financial dealings--so long as independent counsel Kenneth W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While testimony in the Susan McDougal embezzlement trial focuses on the dry details of canceled checks and 6-year-old credit card receipts, a far more entertaining sideshow over matters of decorum continues between the scolding judge and the voluble defendant. As far as Superior Court Judge Leslie W. Light is concerned, he rules Department M in Santa Monica. "This courtroom is not being run by the defendant in any way, shape or form whatsoever," he said sternly on Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Santa Monica Superior Court judge put off for two weeks the trial of Whitewater business partner Susan McDougal, who is accused of embezzling $150,000 from the wife of conductor Zubin Mehta, her former employer. Judge Steven C. Suzukawa granted a defense motion to delay the trial until July 24, even as he indicated his irritation with both the defense's failure to have McDougal brought from home detention in Arkansas and the bickering between the defense and prosecution.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
Alleged cash payoffs to Bill Clinton of $2,000 a month. A supposed presidential promise to pardon Susan McDougal. Convicted felon James B. McDougal, in a new book, fired off one last round of accusations before his death, all of them denied by the president's Whitewater lawyer. McDougal's first-person account, written with Boston Globe reporter Curtis Wilkie, quotes President Clinton as saying in 1996 "you can depend on that" when McDougal requested a pardon for his former wife.
OPINION
March 15, 1998
Re "Whitewater Witness James McDougal Dies," March 9: In death, James McDougal has provided the American people with a greater service than he could ever perform in life. McDougal was a convicted thief; he swindled millions from the government and was an admitted liar (either he lied to protect the president, or more probably, he lied to get a reduced sentence after he was convicted). Now his death has prompted Kenneth Starr to describe McDougal as a "true Southern gentleman." Thank you, James McDougal, for showing us what Starr really thinks of us. Susan McDougal refused to lie for Starr and went to jail; the "gentleman" faced 85 years in jail for his crimes, but probably would have spent less time in jail than his ex-wife, for saying what Starr wanted to hear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1994
Appointing Robert Fiske as special counsel for the Whitewater affair (Jan. 21) is an outrageous waste of the taxpayer's money and an egregious disservice to the American public. What will be accomplished by this investigation? How can this effort possibly help reduce our debt, pass a comprehensive health care program or in any way facilitate the solution of the very serious problems we have? We have a new, vigorous President who is working hard to bring about change in our country.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a turnabout that could affect the Whitewater investigation, President Clinton's friend and investment partner James B. McDougal is cooperating with independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, apparently seeking leniency in the sentencing for his conviction on fraud and conspiracy charges, sources close to the case said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 20, 1997 | Reuters
A federal judge on Monday denied a request by James B. McDougal, President Clinton's former Whitewater partner, to remain free while he appeals convictions on fraud and conspiracy charges. Whitewater prosecutors had agreed not to oppose McDougal's request, but U.S. District Judge George Howard turned it down, saying he was not convinced the appeal would result in a reversal of the convictions or a new trial. "The motion for bond pending appeal has been denied," Howard said in his ruling.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bid to avoid prison, President Clinton's former Whitewater business partner has changed his story and told prosecutors that Clinton attended a 1986 meeting in which an illegal loan was discussed, according to the New Yorker magazine. James B.
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