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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1993 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man admitted Wednesday that he committed a bank robbery that netted the largest single haul in Los Angeles history, but testified that he had been "commanded" to do so by God. "The Lord specifically commanded me to rob the banks so that's what I did," said James Ambrose McGrath, one of two men charged in a sophisticated string of nine armed robberies across the San Fernando Valley.
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BOOKS
July 4, 1999 | ANTHONY M. PLATT, Anthony M. Platt is the author of "The Child Savers: The Invention of Deliquency," among other works. He teaches at Cal State Sacramento and is on the editorial board of Social Justice. He is currently a Mayers fellow at The Huntington Library
Criminal justice used to be a public spectacle with ritualized executions in town centers and criminals on display in stocks. By the 19th century, when the first penitentiaries were built in the United States, punishment still had an important physical presence, and the lives of the free and unfree were intertwined on a daily basis. But as industrialization took hold and convict labor lost its value, American prisons increasingly became a world apart.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1994 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convicted bank robber who was sentenced to 30 years in prison on Monday told a federal judge that he stole nearly $1 million from nine San Fernando Valley banks to warn the public of a coming thermonuclear attack by the Japanese. Rejecting a defense that God told him to rob banks, a federal jury convicted James Ambrose McGrath in October on 18 counts of armed robbery and weapons violations in connection with a string of robberies that included the biggest bank heist in Los Angeles history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1994 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convicted bank robber who was sentenced to 30 years in prison on Monday told a federal judge that he stole nearly $1 million from nine San Fernando Valley banks to warn the public of a coming thermonuclear attack by the Japanese. Rejecting a defense that God told him to rob banks, a federal jury convicted James Ambrose McGrath in October on 18 counts of armed robbery and weapons violations in connection with a string of robberies that included the biggest bank heist in Los Angeles history.
NEWS
February 6, 1993
Earl James McGrath, 90, U.S. commissioner of education under President Harry S. Truman and President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Born in Buffalo, N.Y., McGrath earned degrees at the University of Buffalo and the University of Chicago. He was appointed to the top national education post by Truman in 1949 and resigned under Eisenhower in 1954 over cuts in the education budget.
BOOKS
July 4, 1999 | ANTHONY M. PLATT, Anthony M. Platt is the author of "The Child Savers: The Invention of Deliquency," among other works. He teaches at Cal State Sacramento and is on the editorial board of Social Justice. He is currently a Mayers fellow at The Huntington Library
Criminal justice used to be a public spectacle with ritualized executions in town centers and criminals on display in stocks. By the 19th century, when the first penitentiaries were built in the United States, punishment still had an important physical presence, and the lives of the free and unfree were intertwined on a daily basis. But as industrialization took hold and convict labor lost its value, American prisons increasingly became a world apart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1990
A 32-year-old Brea man was stabbed in the stomach Sunday morning, and police later arrested a suspect. The victim, James McGrath, 32, of Brea was in the 200 block of South Flower Street in Brea when he was stabbed, officers said. Police said he and another man were arguing about an earlier "traffic altercation in the area of the Orange and Riverside freeways." After getting a description of the man who stabbed McGrath, Brea police issued an alert.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2010 | By Jonah Raskin
James McGrath Morris sees parallels between Gilded Age media baron Joseph Pulitzer's time and ours, pointing out that when Pulitzer (1847-1911) began to shape "yellow journalism," newspapers were going out of business and readers were bemoaning the end of journalism as they knew it. Pulitzer charged ahead, boasting that the color pages of the New York World emerged from the state-of-the-art printing presses "like rainbow tints in the spray." Indeed, the World seemed like something entirely new in the staid universe of American newspapers, perhaps as revolutionary then as the Internet today and as provocative as the practitioners of advocacy journalism on Fox. Morris' magisterial new biography, "Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power" (Harper: 560 pp., $29.99)
NEWS
September 5, 1995 | Associated Press
George Bush, who was instrumental in ending 17 years of postwar estrangement between the United States and Vietnam, arrived Monday in Hanoi for a visit. Bush will become the first former U.S. President to meet with Vietnam's Communist leaders since the Vietnam War ended in 1975. No serving U.S. President has met with Vietnam's leaders. Bush arrived in Hanoi less than one month after the United States and Vietnam opened embassies in each other's capitals. U.S.
SPORTS
April 3, 1992 | MICHAEL ITAGAKI
Second-ranked Mater Dei rallied with two runs in the sixth inning and one in the seventh to post a 3-2 Angelus League baseball victory over Santa Margarita Thursday at Mater Dei High School. With two outs in the seventh and a runner on first, catcher Darren Troilo hit James McGrath's first pitch into the right-field corner for a double.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1993 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man admitted Wednesday that he committed a bank robbery that netted the largest single haul in Los Angeles history, but testified that he had been "commanded" to do so by God. "The Lord specifically commanded me to rob the banks so that's what I did," said James Ambrose McGrath, one of two men charged in a sophisticated string of nine armed robberies across the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
February 6, 1993
Earl James McGrath, 90, U.S. commissioner of education under President Harry S. Truman and President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Born in Buffalo, N.Y., McGrath earned degrees at the University of Buffalo and the University of Chicago. He was appointed to the top national education post by Truman in 1949 and resigned under Eisenhower in 1954 over cuts in the education budget.
SPORTS
May 23, 1992
Ten Orange County high schools were honored at Dodger Stadium recently in the Southern Section's "Shake for Sportsmanship" awards ceremony. The program honored schools for outstanding sportsmanlike conduct throughout the 1991-92 school year. Among the criteria for winning the award is participation, enthusiasm, behavior at home and away games and treatment of opponents and officials.
SPORTS
May 12, 1990
Orange Lutheran High School won its seventh consecutive game and gained a share of the Olympic League baseball title Friday with a 5-1 victory over Whittier Christian on the final day of the regular season. Kent Dowding pitched a three-hitter with nine strikeouts for the victory and has a single-season record 104 strikeouts for Orange Lutheran (18-6, 12-2 in league). Doug Senne had two hits and an RBI and Mic Buehler had an RBI single for Orange Lutheran.
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