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James Mcmichael

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NEWS
April 20, 1997 | JANET WISCOMBE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James McMichael, one of the nation's preeminent poets, is seated at the kitchen table of his pinky-beige suburban condo talking about being a single parent raising a teenage son. McMichael is framed, not by volumes of Walt Whitman or William Blake, but by a wallpaper border of achingly cheerful sunflowers. The surroundings are more about decor than food. McMichael confesses sadly that he isn't much of a cook. He and his son never eat together. They never talk.
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NEWS
April 30, 1997 | JANET WISCOMBE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James McMichael, one of the nation's preeminent poets, is seated at the kitchen table of his pinky-beige suburban condo talking about being a single parent raising a teenage son. He is framed, not by volumes of Walt Whitman or William Blake, but by a wallpaper border of achingly cheerful sunflowers. The surroundings are more about decor than food. McMichael confesses sadly that he isn't much of a cook. He and his son never eat together. They never talk.
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NEWS
April 30, 1997 | JANET WISCOMBE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James McMichael, one of the nation's preeminent poets, is seated at the kitchen table of his pinky-beige suburban condo talking about being a single parent raising a teenage son. He is framed, not by volumes of Walt Whitman or William Blake, but by a wallpaper border of achingly cheerful sunflowers. The surroundings are more about decor than food. McMichael confesses sadly that he isn't much of a cook. He and his son never eat together. They never talk.
NEWS
April 20, 1997 | JANET WISCOMBE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James McMichael, one of the nation's preeminent poets, is seated at the kitchen table of his pinky-beige suburban condo talking about being a single parent raising a teenage son. McMichael is framed, not by volumes of Walt Whitman or William Blake, but by a wallpaper border of achingly cheerful sunflowers. The surroundings are more about decor than food. McMichael confesses sadly that he isn't much of a cook. He and his son never eat together. They never talk.
MAGAZINE
August 9, 1987 | SUSAN SQUIRE
WITHIN IRVINE'S poetry workshop, life is fairly serene. There is no anxiety about making connections to agents and editors and publishers, no debate over literary versus commercial work. The only thing anyone ever frets over here is how to keep writing and still have the occasional hot meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1997 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A show of hands indicated that among the hundreds of people who attended a recent publishing panel almost all were writing novels. It's mind-boggling. How does the novice writer get out of the crowd, out of the slush pile and onto the bookstore's shelves? Local novelist/book doctor Sherry Gottlieb provides some answers. She has written a chapter called "The Book Doctor Is In" for "The Portable Writers Conference," a collection of writings that focus on various aspects of the publishing world.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long search for a writer to fill the second faculty teaching position in UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate Program in Writing has ended. English-born novelist Judith Grossman has accepted the post and will begin teaching graduate and undergraduate creative writing in the 1993 winter quarter. Grossman, author of the critically acclaimed 1988 novel "Her Own Terms," has more than 25 years of experience teaching writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2006 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
Works set in the American West and Midwest won major prizes at the 2006 National Book Awards on Wednesday, in a year when the fiction and nonfiction categories included two nominees inspired by the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 or their aftermath. The nonfiction prize went to Timothy Egan for his look back at an earlier American crisis, "The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl," published by Houghton Mifflin. "We are a storytelling nation ...
BOOKS
November 27, 1994 | Robert Hass, Robert Hass is the author, most recently, of "The Essential Haiku" (Ecco Press)
David St. John, who teaches at the University of Southern California and whose new book was nominated for the National Book Award, is a gorgeous writer. This has been true of his work from the beginning, but I think even those who have followed him closely will be taken by surprise when they read "Study for the World's Body." It is a selection of poems, and gathers work from St. John's four previous collections, beginning with the stylish and much-praised "Hush" of 1976, adds to it the best of "The Shore" (1980)
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lengthy search for a writer to fill the second faculty teaching position in UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate Program in Writing has finally ended. English-born novelist Judith Grossman has accepted the post and will begin teaching graduate and undergraduate creative writing in the 1993 winter quarter. Grossman, author of the critically acclaimed 1988 novel "Her Own Terms," has more than 25 years of experience teaching writing.
BOOKS
February 23, 1997
FICTION WINNER: A Fine Balance. By Rohinton Mistry (Alfred A. Knopf) Every Man for Himself. By Beryl Bainbridge (Carroll & Graf) The Ghost Road. By Pat Barker (Dutton) Ship Fever and Other Stories. By Andrea Barrett (W.W. Norton & Co.) About Schmidt. By Louis Begley (Alfred A. Knopf) Tree of Heaven. By R.C. Binstock (Soho Press) Santa Evita. By Tomas Eloy Martinez (Alfred A. Knopf) Open Heart. By A.B.
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