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August 12, 2001 | HUGH HART, Hugh Hart is a regular contributor to Calendar
Like his hero Toulouse-Lautrec, New York illustrator James McMullan understands the power of a telling gesture, the charisma of the human figure and the peculiar magnetism of troubled characters. He is, in short, perfectly suited for designing theater posters.
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August 12, 2001 | HUGH HART, Hugh Hart is a regular contributor to Calendar
Like his hero Toulouse-Lautrec, New York illustrator James McMullan understands the power of a telling gesture, the charisma of the human figure and the peculiar magnetism of troubled characters. He is, in short, perfectly suited for designing theater posters.
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MAGAZINE
October 16, 1994
It was gratifying to read Jonathan Gold's commemorative essay about his mother ("A Good Teacher Passes," On the Town, Sept. 18). I knew Judy Gold when I taught at Dorsey High School. She was the best librarian I ever worked with in my 20-plus years of teaching English. It wasn't uncommon to visit Dorsey's library at any time during the school day, especially at lunch time, and see a cluster of her students, from all cultural groups, magnetized by her special talent for finding the right book, knowing the small details of a puzzling assignment or just being there to listen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2001
Through June 17: "From the Sun King to the Royal Twilight: Painting in Eighteenth-Century France From the Musee de Picardie, Amiens," Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Through June 24: "Private Passions: Outstanding Collections in Los Angeles," Craft and Folk Art Museum. Through July 1: "Telematic Connections: The Virtual Embrace," a traveling show at the Art Center College of Design, traces the history of artists' use of technological methods for their creative purposes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2002 | HUGH HART
By the end of September, people driving through Westwood will be greeted by banners bearing the image of a mysterious gentleman peering from behind a curtain, beckoning passersby to the Geffen Playhouse. The man is Joseph Cotten, and no, he's not being brought back from the dead for a stage adaptation of "The Third Man."
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