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May 21, 1995 | Stanley Meisler, Stanley Meisler is The Times' United Nations bureau chief
James McNeill Whistler, the 19th- Century American painter, would stroll about the great cities of Europe with a monocle, a walking stick, a top hat, an arching mustache and a shock of white hair sprouting from his enormous, wavy, dark mane. To the public, according to an artist friend, he seemed like "the fop, the cynic, the brilliant, flippant, vain and careless idler." In a sense, Whistler was the Andy Warhol of his time.
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May 21, 1995 | Stanley Meisler, Stanley Meisler is The Times' United Nations bureau chief
James McNeill Whistler, the 19th- Century American painter, would stroll about the great cities of Europe with a monocle, a walking stick, a top hat, an arching mustache and a shock of white hair sprouting from his enormous, wavy, dark mane. To the public, according to an artist friend, he seemed like "the fop, the cynic, the brilliant, flippant, vain and careless idler." In a sense, Whistler was the Andy Warhol of his time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1989 | KRISTINE MCKENNA
The voices of such great American poets as Carl Sandburg, Jack Kerouac and Walker Evans whisper through the galleries housing "From Whistler to Pollock: American Prints From the Collection." On view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art through Aug. 6, this selection of 90 works from the museum's permanent collection reveals a little about the evolution of printmaking--which doesn't appear to change that drastically from one decade to the next--and a whole lot about the American Dream.
BOOKS
November 24, 1991 | Carter Ratcliff, Ratcliff is a contributing editor of Art in America. He is currently at work on a book about postwar American painting
Admiring a gibe by James McNeill Whistler, Oscar Wilde admitted, "I wish that I had said that." Replied the painter, "You will, Oscar, you will." Frothy and brilliant, often at the edge of financial disaster, Whistler is a bit too good to be true, as if he designed his life to be irresistible to writers.
BOOKS
November 24, 1991 | Carter Ratcliff, Ratcliff is a contributing editor of Art in America. He is currently at work on a book about postwar American painting
Admiring a gibe by James McNeill Whistler, Oscar Wilde admitted, "I wish that I had said that." Replied the painter, "You will, Oscar, you will." Frothy and brilliant, often at the edge of financial disaster, Whistler is a bit too good to be true, as if he designed his life to be irresistible to writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2000
An exhibition of American art to be sold this spring in New York will appear at Christie's Beverly Hills showroom Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The most valuable of the 31 items to be displayed are James McNeill Whistler's oil painting "Harmony in Gray: Chelsea in Ice" and Andrew Wyeth's tempera-on-panel "Hay Lodge," each of which is expected to bring $2.5 million to $3.5 million at Christie's May 25 auction. Information: (310) 385-2600.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Variations in Violet and Green," a landscape by James McNeill Whistler, was sold at auction in New York for $2,585,000, the most ever paid for a Whistler. The previous Whistler record was set in 1983: $74,250 for his "Beach Near Marseilles." New York art dealers bought "Variations" and a portrait by Thomas Eakins, the latter for $2,420,000, easily breaking the previous record of $240,000 for a work by the Philadelphia portrait painter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A Japanese consortium has pledged $1.5 million toward renovation of the Freer Gallery of Art, a national museum of Asian art and the Smithsonian Institution's first art museum, gallery officials announced Monday. The gift is the largest received by the gallery since it opened in 1923 with a bequest from Detroit industrialist Charles Lang Freer, who gave the Smithsonian his art collection, a building fund and an endowment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2004 | From Associated Press
James McNeill Whistler's "Arrangement in Grey and Black, No. 1: Portrait of the Painter's Mother," better known as "Whistler's Mother," has only visited the United States a few times in the last half-century. But beginning Sunday, visitors can enjoy the 19th century image at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Its home is the Musee d'Orsay in Paris, where it will return in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2003 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
Visitors looking for certain works by John Singleton Copley, James McNeill Whistler, Mary Cassatt, Winslow Homer and Georgia O'Keeffe, among other artists, will need to go to a new address when Chicago's Terra Museum of American Art closes its doors on North Michigan Avenue in late October next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1989 | KRISTINE MCKENNA
The voices of such great American poets as Carl Sandburg, Jack Kerouac and Walker Evans whisper through the galleries housing "From Whistler to Pollock: American Prints From the Collection." On view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art through Aug. 6, this selection of 90 works from the museum's permanent collection reveals a little about the evolution of printmaking--which doesn't appear to change that drastically from one decade to the next--and a whole lot about the American Dream.
NEWS
April 11, 1988 | Associated Press
A respected scholar was convicted today of transporting stolen historic documents, including letters from Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill, that belonged to the National Archives and the Library of Congress. Charles Merrill Mount, 59, was charged with interstate transportation of stolen goods. He faces up to 10 years in prison and a $500,000 fine when sentenced May 23. The jury deliberated four hours Friday and met for about 2 1/2 hours more today before returning the verdict.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Setup: Louisa May Alcott's 1868 classic about the four chin-up March sisters, including aspiring writer Jo (Winona Ryder), and their proud, modern-thinking mother, Marmee (Susan Sarandon). * The Costume Designer: Colleen Atwood, whose credits include "Wyatt Earp," "Philadelphia," "Ed Wood," "Edward Scissorhands," "Silence of the Lambs" and "Married to the Mob."
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